Matching Items (8)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133342-Thumbnail Image.png

On the Way to Fraud: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of the Japanese Culture and How It Contributes to the Commitment of Fraud

Description

An ethical dilemma is not a matter of “right” versus “wrong,” but rather it is a situation of conflicting values. A common ethical dilemma is that of honesty versus loyalty—is it better to tell the truth, or remain loyal

An ethical dilemma is not a matter of “right” versus “wrong,” but rather it is a situation of conflicting values. A common ethical dilemma is that of honesty versus loyalty—is it better to tell the truth, or remain loyal to the company? In the Japanese culture, truth is circumstantial and can vary with different situations. In a way, the Japanese idea of honesty reflects how highly they value loyalty. This overlap of values results in the lack of an ethical dilemma for the Japanese, which creates a new risk for fraud. Without this struggle, a Japanese employee does not have strong justification against committing fraud if it aligns with his values of honesty and loyalty.
This paper looks at the Japanese values relating to honesty and loyalty to show how much these ideas overlap. The lack of a conflict of values creates a risk for fraud, which will be shown through an analysis of the scandals of two Japanese companies, Toshiba and Olympus. These scandals shine light on the complexity of the ethical dilemma for the Japanese employees; since their sense of circumstantial honesty encourages them to lie if it maintains the harmony of the group, there is little stopping them from committing the fraud that their superiors asked them to commit.
In a global economy, understanding the ways that values impact business and decisions is important for both interacting with others and anticipating potential conflicts, including those that may result in or indicate potential red flags for fraud.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

132767-Thumbnail Image.png

An Examination into the Effects of Age and Pressure on Ethical Behavior

Description

Age plays a major role in human behavior, yet little research examines how age shapes ethical behavior. We examine the effects of age on ethical behavior when people face three different ethical pressures: time pressure, financial pressure, and social pressure.

Age plays a major role in human behavior, yet little research examines how age shapes ethical behavior. We examine the effects of age on ethical behavior when people face three different ethical pressures: time pressure, financial pressure, and social pressure. We predict that younger people are more likely than older people to engage in unethical behavior. We also predict that younger people are more influenced by ethical pressures than older people. Results from an experiment provide evidence that younger people are more likely than older people to engage in unethical behavior. In addition, both older and younger people are influenced by the ethical pressures we examine in this study. However, the results do not provide evidence that younger people are more influenced by those ethical pressures than older people. Our study contributes to research examining ethical behavior and age differences in the workplace while providing managers and auditors with a larger perception of unethical drivers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

135603-Thumbnail Image.png

Measures against Accounting Fraud and their Efficacy

Description

The competitive nature of business requires managers to consistently work towards eliminating unnecessary costs and improving financial management. Worldwide, fraud remains a pervasive and expensive problem for businesses. Fraud involving misappropriation of assets (commonly referred to as embezzlement) and fraudulent

The competitive nature of business requires managers to consistently work towards eliminating unnecessary costs and improving financial management. Worldwide, fraud remains a pervasive and expensive problem for businesses. Fraud involving misappropriation of assets (commonly referred to as embezzlement) and fraudulent financial reporting cost organizations trillions of dollars worldwide. To better understand the most effective ways of combating misappropriation and to a lesser extent, fraudulent financial reporting, this paper evaluates research and reports the results of expert interviews with accountants, forensic experts, and security specialists.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

137207-Thumbnail Image.png

A Study on Occupational Fraud within Small Businesses

Description

The main goal of this study was to understand the awareness of small business owners regarding occupational fraud, meaning fraud committed from within an organization. A survey/questionnaire was used to gather insight into the knowledge and perceptions of small business

The main goal of this study was to understand the awareness of small business owners regarding occupational fraud, meaning fraud committed from within an organization. A survey/questionnaire was used to gather insight into the knowledge and perceptions of small business owners, while also obtaining information about the history of fraud and the internal controls within their business. Twenty-four owners of businesses with less than 100 employees participated in the study. The results suggest that small business owners overestimate their knowledge regarding internal controls and occupational fraud, while also underestimating the risk of fraud within their own business. In fact, 92% of participants were not at all familiar with the popular Internal Control \u2014 Integrated Framework published by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The results also show that small business owners tend to overestimate the protection provided by their currently implemented controls in regard to their risk of fraud. Overall, through continued knowledge of internal controls and occupational fraud, business owners can better protect their businesses from the risk of occupational fraud by increasing their awareness of fraud.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

147766-Thumbnail Image.png

Accounting Fraud in the Workplace Today and How To Prevent It

Description

This thesis discusses accounting fraud in the workplace today, using the recent Wirecard scandal as a jumping off point. The thesis goes into the common causes of accounting fraud (organized by the three components of the fraud triangle), effective methods

This thesis discusses accounting fraud in the workplace today, using the recent Wirecard scandal as a jumping off point. The thesis goes into the common causes of accounting fraud (organized by the three components of the fraud triangle), effective methods for countering fraud, and lessons that can be learned from the 2020 Wirecard scandal

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

132866-Thumbnail Image.png

Internal Controls at a Startup Yoga Studio: No Flexible Matter

Description

Within this paper I summarize the key features, and results, of research conducted to support the development, design, and implementation of an internal control system at a startup small business. These efforts were conducted for an Honors Thesis/Creative Project for

Within this paper I summarize the key features, and results, of research conducted to support the development, design, and implementation of an internal control system at a startup small business. These efforts were conducted for an Honors Thesis/Creative Project for Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. The research revolved around deciding which financial policies, procedures, and safeguards could be useful in creating an internal control system for small businesses. In addition to academic research, I developed an “Internal Control Questionnaire” for use as a ‘jumping off point’ in conversations about a business’ existing accounting system. This questionnaire is applicable across many industries, covering the major topics which every small business/startup should consider.

The questionnaire was then used in conjunction with two interviews of small business owners. The interviews covered both the overall financial status of their business and their business’ pre-existing accounting system. The feedback received during these interviews was subsequently used to provide the business owners with eleven recommendations ranging from the implementation of new policies to verification of existing internal controls.

Finally, I summarize my findings, both academic and real-world, conveying that many small business owners do not implement formal internal control systems. I also discuss why the business owners, in this specific circumstance, did not yet implement the aforementioned eleven suggestions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

135068-Thumbnail Image.png

The Olympus Scandal (Accounting Fraud)

Description

The Olympus case gives students an opportunity to analyze the factors and unique cultural environment that led to the accounting fraud in whistle blower Michael Woodford's perspective. It also provides students insights into a traditionally- structured Japanese company to identify

The Olympus case gives students an opportunity to analyze the factors and unique cultural environment that led to the accounting fraud in whistle blower Michael Woodford's perspective. It also provides students insights into a traditionally- structured Japanese company to identify the operation style and leadership distinctions from a U.S. structured company. The case is presented from the comprehensive public record and the book How I Went from CEO to Whistleblower, written by Michael Woodford, all surrounding the Olympus fraud and insider whistleblowing. A primary question that arose when the news of the fraud emerged in the media was: Did the accounting fraud solely result from the failure of Japanese executives' leadership style? Some people think that the Olympus president Tsuyoshi Kikukawa who owned ultimate power over the company is supposed to bear the most responsibility for this issue. However, this case argues that the answer to the previous question is no. What's more important than the corrupt executives is Olympus' operational system that indulged those executives' ambition. Therefore, the case focuses on an analysis of the operating system in regard to leadership, culture, internal controls, external controls and the board of directors. This analysis addresses the failure of Olympus comprehensively rather than placing blame on a single individual. It is an opportunity for students to understand and discuss the multiple aspects of a corporate system that should have the practicable controls and functions to prevent the abuse of decision-making power as well as the illegal activity from occurring.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

134787-Thumbnail Image.png

Is Fraud Cultural?

Description

This study examined if Hofstede's cultural dimensions are able to predict the scheme used to commit fraud and the frequency of the scheme. All six of Hofstede's cultural dimensions were applied to 9 different countries across the world. These countries

This study examined if Hofstede's cultural dimensions are able to predict the scheme used to commit fraud and the frequency of the scheme. All six of Hofstede's cultural dimensions were applied to 9 different countries across the world. These countries were selected based on the number of fraud cases that were reported in the 2016 Report to the Nations published by the Association for Certified Fraud Examiners. The theory was that Hofstede's Cultural dimensions would be able to predict the scheme that would be used to commit fraud. The results however do not support this hypothesis. There were some significant relationships between some of the schemes and Hofstede's cultural dimensions. However there were some of the schemes that had no significant relationships which could be due to the limitations of this study.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12