Matching Items (18)

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Remote Presence in Nature through Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study on the Mental Well-Being of Older Adults

Description

By 2030, the number of people above the age of 65 is projected to outnumber those under the age of 18 for the first time in United States history. With

By 2030, the number of people above the age of 65 is projected to outnumber those under the age of 18 for the first time in United States history. With a growing older population, it is predicted that the amount of people moving into nursing homes and care facilities will also increase. However, a pressing problem is the high prevalence of depression and anxiety among elderly people residing in institutionalized living arrangements. With drugs and antidepressants less effective at treating patients with both dementia and depression, there is a need for more non-pharmacological interventions geared toward improving older adults’ mental well-being. In response, the potential therapeutic effect of exploring virtual nature through EcoRift—which provides dynamic and realistic 360-degree audio and visual environments—on older adults’ mental well-being was examined in this study. Ten individuals (3 men and 7 women) aged 50 and above were recruited and each participant experienced the virtual nature sojourns for 15 minutes once a week, for a total of three weeks. Pre- and post- virtual reality (VR) survey questionnaires were implemented to gauge the participants’ emotional response, including overall well-being and level of relaxation. Physiological measures such as heart rate and blood pressure were also taken before and after the VR experience. Findings show that immersion in nature through virtual reality improves older adults’ mental well-being by eliciting a transient sense of relaxation, peacefulness, and happiness. Further studies need to be performed in order to validate EcoRift’s effect on physiology; however, preliminary data suggests that immersive virtual nature also acts to decrease blood pressure. Overall, EcoRift shows to be a promising tool for bridging access to remote natural environments and may be a mentally beneficial activity for patients isolated in hospitals, hospices, and nursing homes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Does Nature Nurture?: The Positive Impact of Outdoor Immersion on Physical and Mental Health, and the Creation of an Arizona Outdoor Adventure Guide

Description

Spending time outdoors can have a positive impact on the physical and mental health of individuals. These physiological and psychological benefits were comprehensively reviewed, accompanied by a brief history of

Spending time outdoors can have a positive impact on the physical and mental health of individuals. These physiological and psychological benefits were comprehensively reviewed, accompanied by a brief history of these views in American society and how modern programs are promoting outdoor activity. Some of the populations targeted in this research include children, veterans, the elderly, and the clinically ill. A guidebook for Arizona outdoor adventures \u2014 containing original landscape photography \u2014 was created to encourage ASU students to explore local hikes, campsites, and other outdoor opportunities near the city of Phoenix. Each entry contained a brief description of the area or trail, along with the distance from the ASU Tempe campus and information on the length and difficulty of the hike, if applicable. A section at the end of the book was aimed at education readers on basic outdoor survival protocol, as many people venture into the wild with very little understanding of the dangers associated with their activities. A website was made that mirrors the guidebook, but was intended to be a more accessible method of sharing our information. The final component of the project involved maintaining a social media account over the course of the year, allowing us to expand our reach to people beyond ASU and this community. Over the course of the project, the account gained a large following, and several posted photos went on to be featured on prominent regional accounts. By combining the four components described previously, several resources were created for people, particularly students attending ASU, to gain a better understanding of the outdoor adventures available to them, and the benefits that spending time surrounded by nature can have.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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We Are Nature

Description

Humans are undeniably a part of nature. Without Earth's and her resources, we cease to exist. However, in recent years society has lacked the foresight or possibly care to understand

Humans are undeniably a part of nature. Without Earth's and her resources, we cease to exist. However, in recent years society has lacked the foresight or possibly care to understand the impact of our actions both on the planet and ourselves. Resources that industrialized societies are based on are dwindling in reserves and the impact of our actions in getting such resources has been largely harmful. In order to change cycles of overexertion both in our selves and the planet, we must change the ways we think. I propose that humans, very much like the Earth, have limited resources and need to be more mindful in our choices. Wellness and sustainability are two branches of sustaining a larger system and our collective future. On an individual scale, wellness is sustaining our individual resources (i.e. time, energy, thoughts), and can be aided through simple practices to encourage healthy patterns and processes. Sustainability in terms of the planet is sustaining our common resources. This requires a change in our individual selves as well as cooperation to change the larger systems that we are parts of. I separated wellness into three components, core values, positivity, and time management. Sustainability is separated into lifestyle, systems thinking, and learning from life. For each of the six components, I briefly describe their importance and benefits.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Flora Vita: Embark in Nature with Those Who Matter Most

Description

Flora Vita is a digital platform that connects families to outdoor excursions, programmed activities and local events, encouraging the familial ecosystem to flourish within Arizona's vast environment. We curate unique

Flora Vita is a digital platform that connects families to outdoor excursions, programmed activities and local events, encouraging the familial ecosystem to flourish within Arizona's vast environment. We curate unique opportunities that allow families to cultivate internal relationships with one another and form relationships with local like-minded families in pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Emotion and learning in children attending summer science camp

Description

With the overall health of the environment rapidly declining \u2014 mostly due to human behaviors, solving the problem of nature deficit disorder and getting more children interested and aware of

With the overall health of the environment rapidly declining \u2014 mostly due to human behaviors, solving the problem of nature deficit disorder and getting more children interested and aware of nature could be paramount to improving the environmental health of our planet. In this study, the relationship between children's learning and emotion is explored. Pre- and post-tests were given to children attending a week-long summer freshwater ecology camp; their knowledge of and emotional connection to different ecological concepts were measured. Two separate ecosystems were tested \u2014 a freshwater ecosystem that was taught over the course of the week, and a marine ecosystem for comparison. Increases in knowledge and emotion were seen in every freshwater ecosystem concept. Additionally, the knowledge and emotion scores were correlated, suggesting a positive relationship between them. The marine ecosystem did not show improvements in concrete knowledge, but showed increases in abstract learning, indicating that the abstract concepts learned about the freshwater ecosystem were able to transfer to the marine. Overall results show the ability of a hands-on learning experience to foster an emotional connection between a child and the subject matter. However, long-term studies are needed to track the relationship between children and their knowledge of and emotional connection to the subject matter.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The Nature of Cinema: Feminism, Film, and the Nature/Culture Dualism

Description

In this paper, I analyze representations of nature in popular film, using the feminist / deconstructionist concept of a dualism to structure my critique. Using Val Plumwood’s analysis of the

In this paper, I analyze representations of nature in popular film, using the feminist / deconstructionist concept of a dualism to structure my critique. Using Val Plumwood’s analysis of the logical structure of dualism and the 5 ‘features of a dualism’ that she identifies, I critique 5 popular movies – Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Brave, Grizzly Man, and Planet Earth – by locating within each of them one of the 5 features and explaining how the movie functions to reinforce the Nature/Culture dualism . By showing how the Nature/Culture dualism shapes and is shaped by popular cinema, I show how “Nature” is a social construct, created as part of this very dualism, and reified through popular culture. I conclude with the introduction of a number of ‘subversive’ pieces of visual art that undermine and actively deconstruct the Nature/Culture dualism and show to the viewer a more honest presentation of the non-human world.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Deconstructing the ideology of nature and childhood in Korean child narratives

Description

ABSTRACT

In this study, I analyze the construction of childhood and nature in a number of Korean Theatre For Young Audience (TFY) works and family movies produced since 2000. Studying The

ABSTRACT

In this study, I analyze the construction of childhood and nature in a number of Korean Theatre For Young Audience (TFY) works and family movies produced since 2000. Studying The Tale of Haruk, Gamoonjang Baby, Oseam and The Way Home, I explore the childhood memes that surface in the analysis and how they relate to dominant cultural understandings of Korean childhood. Both nature and childhood are metaphorical spaces reflecting the specificity of the cultural context in which they are situated. And in the works I explore, the two are paired in interesting and complex ways and for ideological reasons, the study of which produces a deeper understanding of the construction of Korean childhood. The “child" in Korean TFY has not been thoroughly explored in earlier scholarly work, nor do many preceding studies explore the performance texts of Korean TFY from an analytic stance. This is a serious gap in the literature, considering the significance of the discourse on childhood as a major conceptual framework bolstering TFY and the centrality of the performative aspect of the field. Thus, this study is meaningful as one of the first doctoral works to analyze the performance texts of Korean TFY and the first work to explore Korean TFY from a childhood studies framework. The findings of this interdisciplinary work will be of interest to the field of childhood studies and TFY, broadly defined. In studying the works, my main methodology has been detailed performance analysis. Through the analysis, interesting tropes of Korean childhood emerge, some of which have not been addressed explicitly before. My work reveals Korean childhood as a hybrid cultural assemblage reflecting the complexity of the Korean cultural context, where historical, current, native and foreign ideas about childhood mingle.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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The consequences of human land-use strategies during the PPNB-LN transition: a simulation modeling approach

Description

This dissertation investigates the long-term consequences of human land-use practices in general, and in early agricultural villages in specific. This pioneering case study investigates the "collapse" of the Early (Pre-Pottery)

This dissertation investigates the long-term consequences of human land-use practices in general, and in early agricultural villages in specific. This pioneering case study investigates the "collapse" of the Early (Pre-Pottery) Neolithic lifeway, which was a major transformational event marked by significant changes in settlement patterns, material culture, and social markers. To move beyond traditional narratives of cultural collapse, I employ a Complex Adaptive Systems approach to this research, and combine agent-based computer simulations of Neolithic land-use with dynamic and spatially-explicit GIS-based environmental models to conduct experiments into long-term trajectories of different potential Neolithic socio-environmental systems. My analysis outlines how the Early Neolithic "collapse" was likely instigated by a non-linear sequence of events, and that it would have been impossible for Neolithic peoples to recognize the long-term outcome of their actions. The experiment-based simulation approach shows that, starting from the same initial conditions, complex combinations of feedback amplification, stochasticity, responses to internal and external stimuli, and the accumulation of incremental changes to the socio-natural landscape, can lead to widely divergent outcomes over time. Thus, rather than being an inevitable consequence of specific Neolithic land-use choices, the "catastrophic" transformation at the end of the Early Neolithic was an emergent property of the Early Neolithic socio-natural system itself, and thus likely not an easily predictable event. In this way, my work uses the technique of simulation modeling to connect CAS theory with the archaeological and geoarchaeological record to help better understand the causes and consequences of socio-ecological transformation at a regional scale. The research is broadly applicable to other archaeological cases of resilience and collapse, and is truly interdisciplinary in that it draws on fields such as geomorphology, computer science, and agronomy in addition to archaeology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Managing land, water, and vulnerability on Ocracoke Island, North Carolina

Description

The manner in which land and water are used and managed is a major influencing factor of global environmental change. Globally, modifications to the landscape have drastically transformed social and

The manner in which land and water are used and managed is a major influencing factor of global environmental change. Globally, modifications to the landscape have drastically transformed social and ecological communities. Land and water management practices also influences people's vulnerability to hazards. Other interrelated factors are compounding problems of environmental change as a result of land and water use changes. Such factors include climate change, sea level rise, the frequency and severity of hurricanes, and increased populations in coastal regions. The implication of global climate change for small islands and small island communities is especially troublesome. Socially, small islands have a limited resource base, deal with varying degrees of insularity, generally have little political power, and have limited economic opportunities. The physical attributes of small islands also increase their vulnerability to global climate change, including limited land area, limited fresh water supplies, and greater distances to resources. The focus of this research project is to document place-specific - and in this case island-specific - human-environmental interactions from a political ecology perspective as a means to address local concerns and possible consequences of global environmental change. The place in which these interactions are examined is the barrier island and village of Ocracoke, North Carolina. I focus on the specific historical-geography of land and water management on Ocracoke as a means to examine relationships between local human-environmental interactions and environmental change.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014