Matching Items (10)

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Latina Women in STEM: How Race and Class Shape the Experiences of Undergraduate Women in STEM Majors at Arizona State University

Description

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the barriers that undergraduate Hispanic women, as well as other women of color, face while pursuing an education in a STEM-related major at Arizona State University (ASU). In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 adult participants to dig deeper into the experiences of each woman and analyze how race and class overlap in each of the women's experiences. The concept of intersectionality was used to highlight various barriers such as perceptions of working versus middle-class students, the experience of being a first-generation college student, diversity campus-wide and in the classroom, effects of stereotyping, and impacts of mentorships. All women, no matter their gender, race, or socioeconomic status, faced struggles with stereotyping, marginalization, and isolation. Women in STEM majors at ASU performed better when provided with positive mentorships and grew aspirations to become a professional in the STEM field when encouraged and guided by someone who helped them build their scientific identities. Working-class women suffered from severe stress related to finances, family support, employment, and stereotyping. Reforming the culture of STEM fields in higher education will allow women to achieve success, further build their scientific identities, and increase the rate of women graduating with STEM degrees.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Unauthorized Immigrant Net Economic Contribution in State-Wide Sanctuary Jurisdictions

Description

Sanctuary jurisdictions are jurisdictions that do not enforce one or more aspects of federal immigration policy in regards to unauthorized immigrants. Some states maintain state-wide sanctuary policies while others are

Sanctuary jurisdictions are jurisdictions that do not enforce one or more aspects of federal immigration policy in regards to unauthorized immigrants. Some states maintain state-wide sanctuary policies while others are adamantly against them. Estimates of taxes that unauthorized immigrants pay and estimates of the amount of state funding that unauthorized immigrants can access (education, financial aid, corrections, and welfare) reveal that regardless of sanctuary status, unauthorized immigrants may “pay in” more than they “take out” from the system. The status of “sanctuary jurisdiction” does not appear to have much if any effect on the net state budget. However, unauthorized immigrants are able to access more welfare programs in sanctuary states.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Conquest of Citizenship: The Calderón Experience

Description

On December 28th 2012, immigration authorities arrested my father and mother while grocery shopping. As soon as they stepped outside, immigration officers stopped them to be questioned. Jeopardizing my university

On December 28th 2012, immigration authorities arrested my father and mother while grocery shopping. As soon as they stepped outside, immigration officers stopped them to be questioned. Jeopardizing my university graduation, I took on the challenge to fight court and petition my parents to not be deported. As a first generation born American, I have the power and the right to petition for the freedom of my parents. I was fortunate to be born in this country as a citizen and take advantage of all the opportunities given to me. Up until today, my family and I have done nothing but participate as good citizens. What I failed to realize is that one day our family would become deportation victims of the broken immigration system. There are currently between 11 to12 million undocumented people living in the United States with no pathway to citizenship. My father and mother were humiliated in jail, separated from the family for three months and suffered from emotional distress. It is imperative for me to share our family experience so others know the reality about illegal immigration. In this paper I aspire to leave the reader with knowledge and understanding about illegal immigration. The main purpose of my thesis is to retell my family's experience and the struggle we are still currently facing. The fate of my family was decided on March 25th 2013, and my family has been forever changed. We learned the valuable lesson that as Latinos in the community, we need to fight for freedom and speak on those that are undocumented and afraid.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

Maria's Interview

Description

Maria is a United States citizen whose parents just recently obtained legal status in the US due to Maria having turned 21. Maria has been around the undocumented population her

Maria is a United States citizen whose parents just recently obtained legal status in the US due to Maria having turned 21. Maria has been around the undocumented population her entire life due to a large part of her family being undocumented. She became very involved with the undocumented movement back in 2010 with the passing of SB1070 in Arizona. She states that the reason she became so involved at this time was because she realized how these anti-immigrant laws were affecting her family and her community. She has worked on many campaigns at the local level such as the recall of Russell Pierce, the Adios Arpaio Campaign among other things. She is set to graduate from ASU this May 2015 with a degree in Political Science and Transborder Studies, and hopes to study law one day. She currently works with Unite Here a labor union and continues to be involved with varies campaigns some being DACA/DAPA information sessions among other things

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-30

Monica's Interview

Description

In her interview, Monica discusses her association with the Grassroots Leadership Organization and her involvement with DreamZone. She talks about why DreamZone is important and why she is politically inclined.

In her interview, Monica discusses her association with the Grassroots Leadership Organization and her involvement with DreamZone. She talks about why DreamZone is important and why she is politically inclined. She talks about DreamZone’s Clinton Global Initiative campaign and her involvement at the White House breakout sessions after DACA was signed. She has been involved in sit-ins and letter writing campaigns

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-28

Jonathan's Interview

Description

Jonathan was born in a small farming town in Maryland. He talks about racism, segregation and the homophobic climate that prevailed in his hometown, and how that informed his activism

Jonathan was born in a small farming town in Maryland. He talks about racism, segregation and the homophobic climate that prevailed in his hometown, and how that informed his activism and that of his parents. During middle school, he got involved in activism around queer youth of color. In the beginning, he was mostly involved in LGBT issues. Later, he also organized around economic injustice in peasant and working class communities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-03

Dulce's Interview

Description

Dulce attended school in Mexico up until junior high before coming to the United States on a visa. While in high school she became involved with the robotics team at

Dulce attended school in Mexico up until junior high before coming to the United States on a visa. While in high school she became involved with the robotics team at Carl Hayden and thanks to the encouragement by her two teacher she decided to pursue a STEM education at ASU. She was enrolled at ASU already when the law passed and was unaware of any other undocumented student at the ASU campus at the time. It was through the scholarship(s) that were made available to these undocumented student who were already enrolled at ASU that these undocumented students connected. What originally started off as students discussing various topics through blackboard, then google drive, led to the founding of the Arizona Dream Act Coalition (ADAC). She is co-founder for the ADAC and was the acting president for 2 years, now she just volunteers whenever she can, currently running for a position in the upcoming Executive board. She graduated from ASU with a degree in mechanical engineering, but is currently has her own business as a real estate agent for the past 10 years. She is in the process of applying for citizenship.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05-15

Seth's Interview

Description

In his interview, Seth discusses his hometown as well as his study abroad experiences. He describes how he has come to learn about the undocumented youth movement and his role

In his interview, Seth discusses his hometown as well as his study abroad experiences. He describes how he has come to learn about the undocumented youth movement and his role in the DreamZone workshop. He talks about current political reform and his involvement in political discussion in person and on social media. He describes his experience with AZ Quip and how he feels it is included.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-07

Jesus' Interview

Description

Jesus went to Gadsden High School in Anthony, New Mexico. He studied engineering at Texas A&M University, but ended up changing his major to journalism and mass communication with an

Jesus went to Gadsden High School in Anthony, New Mexico. He studied engineering at Texas A&M University, but ended up changing his major to journalism and mass communication with an emphasis in pubic relations. He worked in housing residential education for about a year in Florida, but later moved to Arizona State University to pursue a PHD in education policy and evaluation. Through his work with students and the community, he became aware of the political and social issues in Arizona. This awareness eventually led him and a friend to create DREAMzone.

Jesus is involved with DREAMzone, the Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project (Q.U.I.P.), Arcoíris Liberation Team, and Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement (California). He was president of the Latino Graduate Student Alliance and is currently the vice-president of the Graduate & Professional Student Association.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-23

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HISPANIC BARRIERS IN THE HEALTH FIELD IN THE PHOENIX METROPOLITAN AREA

Description

This study identifies and examines healthcare barriers experienced by the Hispanic1 population in Phoenix, Arizona. A cross-sectional survey was used to explore these barriers for 123 members of the community,

This study identifies and examines healthcare barriers experienced by the Hispanic1 population in Phoenix, Arizona. A cross-sectional survey was used to explore these barriers for 123 members of the community, and the findings reveal that the main impediments to healthcare faced by the Hispanic population are structured by their language, immigration status, education level, and access to health insurance. The results of the survey were then analyzed to explore possible mechanisms of the origin or intensification of the barriers, as well as potential solutions such as educating future providers to be culturally competent, usage of integrated medical settings, and the advertisement and extension of Promotoras to the community.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05