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Optimizing Recombinant Protein Production for Domain Antibodies: Proof-of-Concept

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Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where therapeutics on the nanometer scale can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the parenchyma. Developing protein-based therapeutics is attractive for a number of reasons, yet, the production

Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where therapeutics on the nanometer scale can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the parenchyma. Developing protein-based therapeutics is attractive for a number of reasons, yet, the production pipeline for high yield and consistent bioactive recombinant proteins remains a major obstacle. Previous studies for recombinant protein production has utilized gram-negative hosts such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to its well-established genetics and fast growth for recombinant protein production. However, using gram-negative hosts require lysis that calls for additional optimization and also introduces endotoxins and proteases that contribute to protein degradation. This project directly addressed this issue and evaluated the potential to use a gram-positive host such as Brevibacillus choshinensis (Brevi) which does not require lysis as the proteins are expressed directly into the supernatant. This host was utilized to produce variants of Stock 11 (S11) protein as a proof-of-concept towards this methodology. Variants of S11 were synthesized using different restriction enzymes which will alter the location of protein tags that may affect production or purification. Factors such as incubation time, incubation temperature, and media were optimized for each variant of S11 using a robust design of experiments. All variants of S11 were grown using optimized parameters prior to purification via affinity chromatography. Results showed the efficiency of using Brevi as a potential host for domain antibody production in the Stabenfeldt lab. Future aims will focus on troubleshooting the purification process to optimize the protein production pipeline.

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Date Created
2019-05

Investigating the Role of the Perivascular Niche on Glioma Stem Cell Invasion in a Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Tumor Microenvironment Model

Description

Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most aggressive form of cancer that begins within the brain. The two-year average survival rate of GBM in the United States of America is 25%, and it has a higher

Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most aggressive form of cancer that begins within the brain. The two-year average survival rate of GBM in the United States of America is 25%, and it has a higher incidence in individuals within the ages of 45 - 60 years. GBM Tumor formation can either begin as normal brain cells or develop from an existing low-grade astrocytoma and are housed by the perivascular niche in the brain microenvironment. This niche allows for the persistence of a population of cells known as glioma stem cells (GSC) by supplying optimum growth conditions that build chemoresistance and cause recurrence of the tumor within two to five years of treatment. It has therefore become imperative to understand the role of the perivascular niche on GSCs through in vitro modelling in order to improve the efficiency of therapeutic treatment and increase the survival rate of patients with GBM.

In this study, a unique three dimensional (3D) microfluidic platform that permitted the study of intercellular interactions between three different cell types in the perivascular niche of the brain was developed and utilized for the first time. Specifically, human endothelial cells were embedded in a fibrin matrix and introduced into the vascular layer of the microfluidic platform.

After spontaneous formation of a vascular layer, Normal Human Astrocytes and Patient derived GSC were embedded in a Matrigel® matrix and incorporated in the stroma and tumor regions of the microfluidic device respectively.

Using the established platform, migration, proliferation and stemness of GSCs studies were conducted. The findings obtained indicate that astrocytes in the perivascular niche significantly increase the migratory and proliferative properties of GSCs in the tumor microenvironment, consistent with previous in vivo findings.

The novel GBM tumor microenvironment developed herein, could be utilized for further

in-depth cellular and molecular level studies to dissect the influence of individual factors within the tumor niche on GSCs biology, and could serve as a model for developing targeted therapies.

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Date Created
2020