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Optimizing Recombinant Protein Production for Domain Antibodies: Proof-of-Concept

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Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where therapeutics on the nanometer scale can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the parenchyma. Developing protein-based therapeutics is attractive for a number of reasons, yet, the production

Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where therapeutics on the nanometer scale can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the parenchyma. Developing protein-based therapeutics is attractive for a number of reasons, yet, the production pipeline for high yield and consistent bioactive recombinant proteins remains a major obstacle. Previous studies for recombinant protein production has utilized gram-negative hosts such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to its well-established genetics and fast growth for recombinant protein production. However, using gram-negative hosts require lysis that calls for additional optimization and also introduces endotoxins and proteases that contribute to protein degradation. This project directly addressed this issue and evaluated the potential to use a gram-positive host such as Brevibacillus choshinensis (Brevi) which does not require lysis as the proteins are expressed directly into the supernatant. This host was utilized to produce variants of Stock 11 (S11) protein as a proof-of-concept towards this methodology. Variants of S11 were synthesized using different restriction enzymes which will alter the location of protein tags that may affect production or purification. Factors such as incubation time, incubation temperature, and media were optimized for each variant of S11 using a robust design of experiments. All variants of S11 were grown using optimized parameters prior to purification via affinity chromatography. Results showed the efficiency of using Brevi as a potential host for domain antibody production in the Stabenfeldt lab. Future aims will focus on troubleshooting the purification process to optimize the protein production pipeline.

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2019-05

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Investigating the Mechanism of a Multi-State Model of WNT Signaling

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The WNT signaling pathway plays numerous roles in development and maintenance of adult homeostasis. In concordance with it’s numerous roles, dysfunction of WNT signaling leads to a variety of human diseases ranging from developmental disorders to cancer. WNT signaling is

The WNT signaling pathway plays numerous roles in development and maintenance of adult homeostasis. In concordance with it’s numerous roles, dysfunction of WNT signaling leads to a variety of human diseases ranging from developmental disorders to cancer. WNT signaling is composed of a family of 19 WNT soluble secreted glycoproteins, which are evolutionarily conserved across all phyla of the animal kingdom. WNT ligands interact most commonly with a family of receptors known as frizzled (FZ) receptors, composed of 10 independent genes. Specific interactions between WNT proteins and FZ receptors are not well characterized and are known to be promiscuous, Traditionally canonical WNT signaling is described as a binary system in which WNT signaling is either off or on. In the ‘off’ state, in the absence of a WNT ligand, cytoplasmic β-catenin is continuously degraded by the action of the APC/Axin/GSK-3β destruction complex. In the ‘on’ state, when WNT binds to its Frizzled (Fz) receptor and LRP coreceptor, this protein destruction complex is disrupted, allowing β-catenin to translocate into the nucleus where it interacts with the DNA-bound T cell factor/lymphoid factor (TCF/LEF) family of proteins to regulate target gene expression. However in a variety of systems in development and disease canonical WNT signaling acts in a gradient fashion, suggesting more complex regulation of β-catenin transcriptional activity. As such, the traditional ‘binary’ view of WNT signaling does not clearly explain how this graded signal is transmitted intracellularly to control concentration-dependent changes in gene expression and cell identity. I have developed an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based model that recapitulates the same in vivo developmental effects of the WNT signaling gradient on the anterior-posterior (A/P) patterning of the neural tube observed during early development. Using RNA-seq and ChIP-seq I have characterized β-catenin binding at different levels of WNT signaling and identified different classes of β-catenin peaks that bind cis-regulatory elements to influence neural cell fate. This work expands the traditional binary view of canonical WNT signaling and illuminates WNT/β-catenin activity in other developmental and diseased contexts.

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2019