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3D Printing Sensor-Stents

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This paper summarizes the [1] ideas behind, [2] needs, [3] development, and [4] testing of 3D-printed sensor-stents known as Stentzors. This sensor was successfully developed entirely from scratch, tested, and was found to have an output of 3.2*10-6 volts per

This paper summarizes the [1] ideas behind, [2] needs, [3] development, and [4] testing of 3D-printed sensor-stents known as Stentzors. This sensor was successfully developed entirely from scratch, tested, and was found to have an output of 3.2*10-6 volts per RMS pressure in pascals. This paper also recommends further work to render the Stentzor deployable in live subjects, including [1] further design optimization, [2] electrical isolation, [3] wireless data transmission, and [4] testing for aneurysm prevention.

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2014-05

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MEMS harsh environment sensors for earth and space exploration

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Harsh environments have conditions that make collecting scientific data difficult with existing commercial-off-the-shelf technology. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is ideally suited for harsh environment characterization and operation due to the wide range of materials available and an incredible

Harsh environments have conditions that make collecting scientific data difficult with existing commercial-off-the-shelf technology. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is ideally suited for harsh environment characterization and operation due to the wide range of materials available and an incredible array of different sensing techniques while providing small device size, low power consumption, and robustness. There were two main objectives of the research conducted. The first objective was to design, fabricate, and test novel sensors that measure the amount of exposure to ionizing radiation for a wide range of applications including characterization of harsh environments. Two types of MEMS ionizing radiation dosimeters were developed. The first sensor was a passive radiation-sensitive capacitor-antenna design. The antenna's emitted frequency of peak-intensity changed as exposure time to radiation increased. The second sensor was a film bulk acoustic-wave resonator, whose resonant frequency decreased with increasing ionizing radiation exposure time. The second objective was to develop MEMS sensor systems that could be deployed to gather scientific data and to use that data to address the following research question: do temperature and/or conductivity predict the appearance of photosynthetic organisms in hot springs. To this end, temperature and electrical conductivity sensor arrays were designed and fabricated based on mature MEMS technology. Electronic circuits and the software interface to the electronics were developed for field data collection. The sensor arrays utilized in the hot springs yielded results that support the hypothesis that temperature plays a key role in determining where the photosynthetic organisms occur. Additionally, a cold-film fluidic flow sensor was developed, which is suitable for near-boiling temperature measurement. Future research should focus on (1) developing a MEMS pH sensor array with integrated temperature, conductivity, and flow sensors to provide multi-dimensional data for scientific study and (2) finding solutions to biofouling and self-calibration, which affects sensor performance over long-term deployment.

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2013