Matching Items (14)

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Business Opportunity Analysis: Cannabis Sharecropping Garden

Description

The Medical Cannabis industry is booming currently as 28 states and the District of Columbia now allow medical cannabis operations to proceed. However the current layout of medical cannabis operations

The Medical Cannabis industry is booming currently as 28 states and the District of Columbia now allow medical cannabis operations to proceed. However the current layout of medical cannabis operations is extremely limited, leaving room for innovations to occur. This Thesis will explore the opportunity surrounding the concept of a cannabis sharecropping garden. The goal is to portray any potential value the business concept presents as well as analyzing the processes and opportunity that lie within. A survey was utilized within this study in order to accurately gain information from the intended demographic of the business. Value proposition of the patient as well as the gap within the market are discussed accordingly. Topics that define the opportunity are analyzed, including market analysis, go to market strategy, as well as the financial return of the opportunity. Additionally, based upon the results of the study, a potentially feasible and investable business opportunity is presented.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

Attention and Memory Problems in Everyday Life Among Young Adult Cannabis Users

Description

The need to fully understand the possible consequences of young-adult cannabis use has become increasingly critical as a result of major cannabis policy changes. The purpose of this study was

The need to fully understand the possible consequences of young-adult cannabis use has become increasingly critical as a result of major cannabis policy changes. The purpose of this study was to determine if young-adult users exhibit cognitive deficits on laboratory-based tests and memory and attention deficits in everyday life. Participants were 152 students from a large U.S. university enrolled in introductory psychology courses and the top and bottom 10% of the 12-item Yale University PRIME Screening Test for psychotic-like experiences. Participants were asked about their cannabis use and were given six cognitive tests spanning executive function and memory. To test functional impairment in memory and attention, participants were asked to nominate informants (people who knew them well) and these rated the participants on an attention problems scale of four items and a memory problems scale of three items. Results showed that individuals who used cannabis more frequently were rated as having more attention and memory problems and that, consistent with prior research, more frequent cannabis use was associated with worse memory test performance, though the association was not present between frequency of use and executive function test performance. Additionally, it was found that informant-reported attention problems were associated with poorer performance on two of the executive function cognitive tests. The present findings suggest that individuals who use cannabis more frequently experience noticeable memory and attention problems in everyday life, despite the lack of significant correlation between this functional impairment and cognitive test performance. Informant reports, therefore, may be useful in future research for understanding or predicting cognitive impairment in young adults.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Comparative Analysis of Indoor and Greenhouse Cannabis Cultivation Systems

Description

In A Comparative Analysis of Indoor and Greenhouse Cannabis Cultivation Systems, the two most common systems for commercial cannabis cultivation are compared using an operational and capital expenditure model combined

In A Comparative Analysis of Indoor and Greenhouse Cannabis Cultivation Systems, the two most common systems for commercial cannabis cultivation are compared using an operational and capital expenditure model combined with a collection of relevant industry sources to ascertain conclusions about the two systems' relative competitiveness. The cannabis industry is one of the fastest growing nascent industries in the United States, and, as it evolves into a mature market, it will require more sophisticated considerations of resource deployment in order to maximize efficiency and maintain competitive advantage. Through drawing on leading assumptions by industry experts, we constructed a model of each system to demonstrate the dynamics of typical capital deployment and cost flow in each system. The systems are remarkably similar in many respects, with notable reductions in construction costs, electrical costs, and debt servicing for greenhouses. Although the differences are somewhat particular, they make up a large portion of the total costs and capital expenditures, causing a marked separation between the two systems in their attractiveness to operators. Besides financial efficiency, we examined quality control, security, and historical norms as relevant considerations for cannabis decision makers, using industry sources to reach conclusions about the validity of each of these concerns as a reason for resistance to implementation of greenhouse systems. In our opinion, these points of contention will become less pertinent with the technological and legislative changes surrounding market maturation. When taking into account the total mix of information, we conclude that the greenhouse system is positioned to become the preeminent method of production for future commercial cannabis cultivators.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Adolescent Predictors of Marijuana Cessation and Motivations for Quitting Marijuana in a Racially Balanced Adult Non-Treatment Sample

Description

Marijuana is currently the mostly widely used illicit drug in the U.S., and has been for multiple decades (Johnston et. al., 2016). Despite a growing belief that marijuana use is

Marijuana is currently the mostly widely used illicit drug in the U.S., and has been for multiple decades (Johnston et. al., 2016). Despite a growing belief that marijuana use is not harmful, over 4 million Americans have met criteria for marijuana use disorders in the past year alone (CBHSQ, 2015). According to marijuana trajectory studies, about a third of marijuana users will end up quitting later in life, but some \u2014 such as those who meet criteria for dependence \u2014 have a much greater difficultly quitting. Therefore, by looking at marijuana users who were successful in quitting, and comparing them to ongoing adult marijuana users, factors that may assist in helping an individual quit \u2014 such as certain motivations for quitting \u2014 may be identified. To study these issues, data was collected from 507 participants from the Pittsburgh Youth Study. It was found that adolescents who used marijuana weekly for at least one year were likely to be ongoing marijuana users in adulthood and that adolescents who had a warm relationship with their primary caretaker were likely to have quit marijuana by adulthood. It was also found that Black participants were more likely to have legal, monetary, and religious reasons for quitting than were White participants. Furthermore, participants who used regularly in adolescence were likely to list legal reasons, as well as a concern that marijuana use was needed to feel normal. Finally, it was found that not a single motivation for quitting marijuana was associated with a shorter period of abstinence. The implications of these findings for motivations to quit marijuana are the focus of the discussion.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Importance of Language in Cannabis Research

Description

This study was designed to learn what students call various forms of cannabis. A survey was created with questions designed to understand students' knowledge of types of cannabis, methods of

This study was designed to learn what students call various forms of cannabis. A survey was created with questions designed to understand students' knowledge of types of cannabis, methods of use, and potency. An introduction and methods section of the research paper is included.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The United States of Cannabis: A Socioeconomic and Legal Analysis of the Cannabis Industry

Description

This paper analyzes the economic, legal, and social aspects of the legal cannabis industry in the United States. These analyses include the history, current status, and future of all three

This paper analyzes the economic, legal, and social aspects of the legal cannabis industry in the United States. These analyses include the history, current status, and future of all three components, all with an emphasis on reforming the existing systems in place in order to achieve the most beneficial cannabis industry possible. Many reformative legal implications are made, stressing the importance of decriminalizing cannabis, releasing nonviolent and cannabis-related criminals from prison, and expunging their criminal records. The paper places a heavy emphasis on the importance of designing the legal system to be fair and equal across all racial and ethnic groups, given that people of color have been hit the hardest in terms of cannabis-related issues. Economic components such as tax design and access to proper financial institutions are also included, as well as the social implications that have both gone into and are a product of the long-standing war on drugs. While there is no comprehensive solution for how to fix every aspect of the industry, this paper highlights key aspects to be aware of in the design stages of potential federal legalization.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Importance of Diversity Within the Cannabis Industry and Expanding Minority-Owned Businesses as a Social Justice Imperative

Description

Change within the cannabis industry could lead to drastic improvements in social justice. Ever since marijuana was first regulated in the United States in the early 1900s, it has been

Change within the cannabis industry could lead to drastic improvements in social justice. Ever since marijuana was first regulated in the United States in the early 1900s, it has been used as the justification for the excessive incarceration and disenfranchisement of targeted groups, specifically, Black and Latino populations. Now, the growing popularity of marijuana, from both the recreational and entrepreneurial perspective, has led to the legalization of recreational cannabis in 15 states. <br/>Although this enterprise is highly profitable and alluring for consumers and business owners, the problem of underrepresentation of minority owned businesses within the industry still remains. This underrepresentation symbolizes the unjust ability for this enterprise to capitalize on those victimized by past drug regulations and on a larger scale, how it perpetuates institutionalized racism. The criminalization of marijuana not only allows for certain groups to remain successful in this booming billion-dollar operation, but also ensures that others remain unseen and left behind. <br/>This thesis aims to show the ways in which the legal cannabis industry can expand and encourage minority-owned businesses to venture into the sector. In this paper, I will attempt to outline the history of cannabis regulation and anti-drug campaigns, and illustrate the lack of diversity within the cannabis industry. I will also touch upon the remedies and reparations for racial inequality and how public policy can address entrepreneur’s demands in future policy considerations and industry practices.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Should Marijuana Be?

Description

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States with over two million pounds seized annually and with a usage rate estimated at 19.8 million people in

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States with over two million pounds seized annually and with a usage rate estimated at 19.8 million people in 2013 (SAMSHA, 2014). Currently there is a nationwide movement for the legalization of recreational marijuana via referendum at the state level. Three states and the District of Columbia have already adopted amendments legalizing marijuana and over a dozen more currently have pending ballots. This report explores what would be the impact of legalizing marijuana in Arizona through the examination of data from Colorado and other governmental sources. Using a benefit/cost analysis the data is used to determine what the effect the legalization of marijuana would have in Arizona. I next examined the moral arguments for legalization. Finally I propose a recommendation for how the issue of the legalization of recreational marijuana should be approached in Arizona.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Cannabis: Cannabinoids, Physiology, and Receptor Evolution

Description

The Cannabis plant has historical roots with human beings. The plant produces compounds called cannabinoids, which are responsible for the physiological affects of Cannabis and make it a research candidate

The Cannabis plant has historical roots with human beings. The plant produces compounds called cannabinoids, which are responsible for the physiological affects of Cannabis and make it a research candidate for medicinal use. Analysis of the plant and its components will help build a better database that could be used to develop a complete roster of medicinal benefits. Research regarding the cellular protein receptors that bind the cannabinoids may not only help provide reasons explaining why the Cannabis plant could be medicinally relevant, but will also help explain how the receptors originated. The receptors may have been present in organisms before the present day Cannabis plant. So why would there be receptors that bind to cannabinoids? Searching for an endocannabinoid system could help explain the purpose of the cannabinoid receptors and their current structures in humans. Using genetic technologies we are able to take a closer look into the evolutionary history of cannabinoids and the receptors that bind them.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Associations between Butane Hash Oil Use, Sensation Seeking, and Delay Discounting

Description

High-potency cannabis concentrates, such as Butane Hash Oil (BHO), are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. It is important to identify risk factors that might distinguish BHO and marijuana

High-potency cannabis concentrates, such as Butane Hash Oil (BHO), are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. It is important to identify risk factors that might distinguish BHO and marijuana (buds and flower of the cannabis plant) use of cannabis because there are consequences associated with BHO use that may not associated with marijuana use, due to the higher THC content of BHO as compared to marijuana. The goal of this study was to gain a better understanding of how two risk factors, sensation seeking and delay discounting, relate to young adult BHO use in order to guide the development of targeted prevention and intervention strategies. A sample of 1,086 college students were recruited to complete a survey about their health and behavior for course credit or extra credit. Participants who had used cannabis in the past year (33%, n=363) completed questions about their cannabis use, including their use of BHO and cannabis-related risk factors, as well as measures of sensation seeking and delay discounting. Of the past-year cannabis users with useable data (n=339), 45% (n=152) had used BHO in the past year. Sensation seeking was found to be associated with past-year BHO use after controlling for demographics, age of first cannabis use, and other substance use including binge drinking and illicit drug use other than cannabis (OR=1.55, p=0.040), however delay discounting was not (OR=0.92, p=0.334). There was no evidence of an interaction between sensation seeking and delay discounting. Longitudinal research is necessary to determine if cannabis users with high sensation seeking tend to seek out BHO and/or if BHO use increases risk for sensation seeking.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05