Matching Items (7)

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Representation of the United Kingdom Pre- and Post- Referendum

Description

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study examines the United Kingdom's image, and determines whether the dissonance exist pre- and post- referendum in the internal imagery of the United Kingdom and imagery portrayed aboard. Leading newspapers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Europe are analyzed to determine the predominant themes. Semi-structured interviews are conducted with the U.S. tour operators and Arizona's travel agents. Tour brochures and user-generated content on TripAdvisor are analyzed to study tourists' responses to Brexit. Skift is analyzed to project future growth in tourism industry. Results show that the leadings newspapers projects similar concerns negatively and positively pre- and post- referendum. Uncertainty in policy changes leads to other themes that are identified such as investment, employment, trade, independence, market growth, etc. It projects the international trade, domestic market growth and global market growth will be significantly impact by Brexit due to higher tariff and regulations on migrants in the United Kingdom. In contrast, travel brochures are marketing UK from heritage, historical attractions, and special events, but they do not reflect the influence of Brexit on how tour operators market UK pre- and post- referendum. Further data is conducted on the semi-structured interviews with travel agents across Arizona, but travel agents responded with Brexit has no influences on US tourists. Additional content analysis on VisitBritain/VisitEngland shows the growth in tourism industry by an increasing provided data collection on tourism performance that reflect there is an increasing departure rate of US tourists in UK after the referendum. User-generated content on TripAdvisor and Skift align with the identified themes in leading newspapers from US, UK, and Europe such as uncertainty in policy change. The present study further outlines preferable method to advance future studies on the destination image of U.K. during and after the Brexit.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Economic Causes & Long-Term Effects of Great Britain's "Brexit" from the European Union

Description

Over the course of the next two years, the United Kingdom and the European Union will be participating in Brexit negotiations over the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union.

Over the course of the next two years, the United Kingdom and the European Union will be participating in Brexit negotiations over the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union. This paper discusses in-depth the expected economic effects of Brexit. To satisfy the desires of those who voted to leave the European Union, the United Kingdom will leave the European Single Market, creating barriers to trade. In exchange, the long-term effects for the United Kingdom and the European Union are expected to be negative. Despite this, it appears that negative effects on British direct foreign investment have been overstated and the European Union may be able to benefit from a well-handled relocation of financial services inside the European Union. The paper also makes a few suggestions regarding Brexit negotiations, advising the United Kingdom to make concessions to European Union in areas such as contributions to the European Union budget for increased goodwill and greater access to European markets.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Brexit and Beyond: The Future Implications on London's Commercial Real Estate Market

Description

This thesis takes the form of a market research report with the goal of analyzing the implications of the United Kingdom (UK) leaving the European Union (EU) (known as “Brexit”)

This thesis takes the form of a market research report with the goal of analyzing the implications of the United Kingdom (UK) leaving the European Union (EU) (known as “Brexit”) on London’s office commercial real estate market. The ultimate goal of this report is to make a prediction, firmly grounded in quantitative and qualitative research conducted over the past several months, as to the direction of London’s commercial real estate market going forward (post-Brexit). Within the commercial real estate sector, this paper narrows its focus to the office segment of the London market.

Understanding the political landscape is crucial to formulating a reasonable prediction as to the future of the London market. Aside from research reports and articles, our main insights into the political direction of Brexit come from our recordings from meetings in March of 2017 with two high-ranking members of Parliament and one member of the House of Lords—all of whom are members of the Tory Party (the meetings being held under the condition of anonymity). The below analysis will be followed by a discussion of the economics of Brexit, primarily focusing on the economic risks and uncertainties which have emerged after the vote, and which currently exist today. Such risks include the UK losing its financial passporting rights, weakening GDP and currency value, the potential for a reduction in foreign direct investment (FDI), and the potential loss of the service sector in the city of London due to not being able to access the European Single Market.

The report will shift focus to analyzing three competing viewpoints of the direction of the London market based on recordings from interviews of stakeholders in the London real estate market. One being an executive of one of the largest REITs in the UK, another being the Global Head of Real Estate at a top asset management firm, and another being a director at a large property consulting firm. The report includes these differing “sub-theses” in order to try to make sense of the vast market uncertainties post-Brexit as well as to contrast their viewpoints with where the market is currently and with the report’s investment recommendation.

The remainder of the report will consist of the methods used for analyzing market trends including how the data was modeled in order to make the investment recommendation. The report will analyze real estate and market metrics pre-Brexit, immediately after the vote, post-Brexit, and will conclude with future projections encapsulating the investment recommendation.

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Transatlantic Populism in 2016: Brexit and Trump

Description

In 2016, the Western world was shocked by the victory of the "Leave" campaign in the referendum on European Union membership in Great Britain and by the victory of Donald

In 2016, the Western world was shocked by the victory of the "Leave" campaign in the referendum on European Union membership in Great Britain and by the victory of Donald Trump in the United States' presidential election. These two electoral successes have been called "populist" campaigns in their respective countries. In this paper, I ask whether the widespread populist sentiment in the United States and Great Britain qualifies as "populist" and should be regarded as part of the same movement. I then explore whether Trump and Leave voters are motivated by a common issue or set of issues. Initially, I frame my argument by defining populism and showing how both campaigns meet the definition. Next, I compare the Leave campaign with the Trump campaign and explore the similarities and differences in the demographics and opinions of their supporters. I determine that while the Trump and Leave campaigns certainly have differences, they should ultimately be treated as two branches of the same movement. Finally, I conclude that both campaigns are more motivated by versions of cultural resentment than economic anxiety.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Brexit and the Resurgence of Nationalism in the United Kingdom

Description

Behind the United Kingdom's unexpected decision to leave the European Union was a resurgence in nationalism caused by a range of issues including economics, cultural change, and rising anti-EU sentiment.

Behind the United Kingdom's unexpected decision to leave the European Union was a resurgence in nationalism caused by a range of issues including economics, cultural change, and rising anti-EU sentiment. Economic factors include globalization and competition with foreign workers. The culture and immigration section discusses the backlash against post-materialist cosmopolitan values and demographic changes caused by immigration. The relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union is analyzed using concepts discussed in Michael Hechter's Alien Rule (2013). In addition to these factors, we theorize that rising global tension and the interconnectedness of European countries were exploited by nationalist forces to strengthen the backlash against both the European Union and liberal cosmopolitan values in general.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Brexit and the Irish Border: Media, Identity, and Rhetoric in the run up to the vote, June 16-23, 2016

Description

In June of 2016, the United Kingdom held a referendum for its citizens to decide whether to remain a part of the European Union or take their leave. The vote

In June of 2016, the United Kingdom held a referendum for its citizens to decide whether to remain a part of the European Union or take their leave. The vote was close but ultimately the U.K. decided to leave, triggering the two-year process of negotiations that would shape the U.K.’s departure (Brexit). The question of what will become of the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland is heavy with implications for the national identity of people living on either side of the border, and this makes it one of the more pressing concerns in Brexit discourse. This research analyzes how national identity is used as a rhetorical tactic in media to influence and persuade readers to vote in accordance with the author’s political goals. It does so by evaluating how borders shape national identity and analyzing newspaper articles from the two highest circulating Northern Irish daily newspapers (The Irish News and the Belfast Telegraph) during the week leading up to the June 23rd, 2016 referendum. In analyzing news articles relating to the Irish border issue of Brexit from The Irish News and the Belfast Telegraph during the time frame of June 16th-23rd, 2016, four analytical categories of how identity-related rhetoric was used were discovered: fear, self-interest, Irish Nationalism, and a negative association of the past. Further, it was hypothesized and confirmed the political leanings of the papers influenced which type of rhetorical tactic was used. In the broad realm of Brexit and media related discussion, this research could help strengthen understanding of how traditional media uses national identity to persuade readers to and influence voting behavior in the midst of such a divisive referendum.

Key Words: Brexit, Irish border, national identity, rhetoric, newspapers

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Hidden Fear: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Messages on Social Media

Description

The development of the internet provided new means for people to communicate effectively and share their ideas. There has been a decline in the consumption of newspapers and traditional broadcasting

The development of the internet provided new means for people to communicate effectively and share their ideas. There has been a decline in the consumption of newspapers and traditional broadcasting media toward online social mediums in recent years. Social media has been introduced as a new way of increasing democratic discussions on political and social matters. Among social media, Twitter is widely used by politicians, government officials, communities, and parties to make announcements and reach their voice to their followers. This greatly increases the acceptance domain of the medium.

The usage of social media during social and political campaigns has been the subject of a lot of social science studies including the Occupy Wall Street movement, The Arab Spring, the United States (US) election, more recently The Brexit campaign. The wide

spread usage of social media in this space and the active participation of people in the discussions on social media made this communication channel a suitable place for spreading propaganda to alter public opinion.

An interesting feature of twitter is the feasibility of which bots can be programmed to operate on this platform. Social media bots are automated agents engineered to emulate the activity of a human being by tweeting some specific content, replying to users, magnifying certain topics by retweeting them. Network on these bots is called botnets and describing the collaboration of connected computers with programs that communicates across multiple devices to perform some task.

In this thesis, I will study how bots can influence the opinion, finding which parameters are playing a role in shrinking or coalescing the communities, and finally logically proving the effectiveness of each of the hypotheses.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020