Matching Items (59)

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Inclusive Band: Music Learning for Students with Special Needs

Description

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the start until Spring 2019 when there was a shift in membership. This caused the Peer Mentors to have to move to new groups. Some moved to a Music Student that played the same instrument while others were because a member graduated or left Inclusive Band and were replaced by new members. This transition was hard for both Peer Mentors and Music Students. The Music Students were used to their Peer Mentors and built a strong friendship with them. Losing them was hard and some still struggle with it several months later. The Peer Mentors also had difficulties adjusting to teaching a different Music Student. They did not know their strengths and weaknesses or the best way to teach them. This challenge led to the creation of the handbook, which is a guide for future members of Inclusive Band to aid with the transition from semester to semester.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Creating a Peer-Mediated Social Story for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to integrate social skills instruction in classroom settings.

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to integrate social skills instruction in classroom settings. Social stories are designed to help a child learn and respond to social cues for successful social interactions. Although, there is limited research on the effectiveness of social stories, research has demonstrated the effectiveness of peer-mediated learning and the effects of positive peer relationships in inclusive early childhood settings. This project draws on the evidence of peer- mediated learning through the medium of social stories to support students with ASD in school settings. This project is the creation of a double-sided social story picture book designed to teach prosocial peer interactions to students with ASD and to teach their peers to support them in learning the specific social skill. The target skill for this peer-mediated social story is learning how to interact with friends in the classroom by initiating and responding to requests to play. \r\nThe project is unique in that this social story includes a section for the student with ASD and a section to support the peer in their role within the social relationship.

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Created

Date Created
2016-12

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Systematic Literature Review Conceptualization of Inclusive Education within Arizona's Borderlands

Description

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family members. Although there is research that states along international borders

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family members. Although there is research that states along international borders are complex and diverse educational spaces, the information found regarding special education along the U.S-Mexico border mostly centers on the issue of over-representation of Mexican-American, Yaqui and Navajo students. There is validity and need to present these specific issues and groups of individuals, however there is little empirical data that involves the attitudes, perspectives and experiences of other stakeholders, such as parents, educators, and administrators who participate in special education processes, in a way that reflects education in borderlands as an asset-based setting and that engages in dialogue about across all of the disabilities categories protected under IDEA and 504 plans. Key Words: special education, parents, teachers, literature review, borderlands

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Date Created
2018-05

SpecialT’s In Special Education: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

Description

Here’s the latest from my blog- Tips for Struggling Writers, sharing my knowledge on<br/>how not only special educators, but anyone can help individuals who struggle with writing. I share my input as well as including immense research and peer reviewed

Here’s the latest from my blog- Tips for Struggling Writers, sharing my knowledge on<br/>how not only special educators, but anyone can help individuals who struggle with writing. I share my input as well as including immense research and peer reviewed articles to show my understanding of the value of education. Through my blog, one should be able to sit down and understand what makes up a special education world. My blog is the fast track version of a Special Education 101 class. As you travel through, I hope to share different tips, tricks, and techniques that you can apply in your own classroom.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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The Use of Music for the Inclusivity of Autistic Children

Description

One obstacle which children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) face when learning in a public-school environment is the lack of feeling included when learning. In this study, the term inclusion refers to time that children with ASDs spend in general

One obstacle which children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) face when learning in a public-school environment is the lack of feeling included when learning. In this study, the term inclusion refers to time that children with ASDs spend in general education settings, interacting and/or engaging with neurotypical students and teachers. Inclusion can help students with ASDs improve their social skills, as well as academic achievement, mental health, and future success (Camargo et al., 2014). Since children with ASDs often have difficulties with social interaction skills, this can prevent their successful inclusion in general education placements. Music is a type of behaviorally-based intervention, which has proven to be effective in helping students develop the skills necessary to be successfully included, and because it is a type of activity which can serve as a bit of a distraction from the social aspect of the interaction, it can help children practice social skills and interact in a comfortable way. This study examines how music is used in public school settings to help foster the skills necessary for autistic children to be involved in standard school curriculums in order to allow them to receive the full benefits from learning in a general education setting. This study was conducted by reviewing past literature on the benefits of inclusion in special education, the benefits of music for children with ASDs, and the difference in efficacy of music interventions when conducted in an inclusive setting. Interviews with special education teachers, music educators, and music therapists were also conducted to address examples of the impact of music in this research area. The study found that music is beneficial in allowing more students to be included in standard school curriculums, and data showed the trend that inclusion positively affected their social and academic development.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Expectations and the post transition of young adults with an autism spectrum disorder to post-secondary education

Description

Over the past two decades, substantial research has documented the increase of students with disabilities enrolling in post-secondary education. The purpose of the study was to examine factors identified as significant in preparing individuals who fall on the autism

Over the past two decades, substantial research has documented the increase of students with disabilities enrolling in post-secondary education. The purpose of the study was to examine factors identified as significant in preparing individuals who fall on the autism spectrum for post-secondary experiences. The study was exploratory in nature and designed to identify perceived critical program elements needed to design successful post-secondary transition programs for students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study used archival research and grounded theory to look at expectations of parents with young adults with an ASD and young adults with an ASD on post-secondary transition and to discern whether expectations impact the successful post transition of young adults. More than likely, due to an overall increase in the prevalence of ASDs, many more students with an ASD will be attending a post-secondary educational setting in the near future. Understanding expectations and particular challenges faced by students with an ASD will be necessary for colleges to meet the unique needs of this population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Evaluation of a biofeedback intervention in college students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders

Description

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n=10) and in a typical college population (n=37). The use

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n=10) and in a typical college population (n=37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future research in the areas of biofeedback and accommodations for college students with ASD. Comparing the first five weeks of the study with the second five weeks of the 10 week study, both groups showed improvement in their control of heart rate variability, a physiological marker for anxiety used in biofeedback. The ASD group showed greater gains, more consistent gains, and less variability in raw scores than the typical group. EDA also revealed a pattern between participant attrition and a participant's biofeedback progress. Implications are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Student perceptions of co-teaching: what do students think about co-teaching?

Description

Co-teaching is one of the most popular models for supporting students with disabilities in general education classrooms. In spite of this, there is a paucity of research on student perceptions of co-teaching. The purpose of this qualitative study was to

Co-teaching is one of the most popular models for supporting students with disabilities in general education classrooms. In spite of this, there is a paucity of research on student perceptions of co-teaching. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of co-teaching in a high school biology classroom. Over nine weeks, data was collected from students in a co-taught and traditional classroom through observations and focus groups. Qualitative content analysis identified three themes and eight categories which highlight student perceptions of co-teaching. Themes and categories that emerged were: 1) Environment which included the categories of availability of help, students feeling supported and normalcy of the classroom, 2) Instruction which included student engagement, lesson activity and teacher(s) role(s) and, 3) Relationships which included relationships between teacher(s) and student(s) and parity between teachers. Information from the study deepens researchers' and practitioners' understanding of how students perceive co-teaching and provide new avenues for future research and best practices.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Using funds of knowledge to build trust between a teacher and parents of language-delayed preschoolers

Description

Preschool children with language delays often struggle to learn new concepts. Proven strategies such as modeling, prompting, reinforcing responses, direct teaching, and hands-on experience matter to young children with language delays. Also important are social interactions and shared experiences with

Preschool children with language delays often struggle to learn new concepts. Proven strategies such as modeling, prompting, reinforcing responses, direct teaching, and hands-on experience matter to young children with language delays. Also important are social interactions and shared experiences with more knowledgeable persons. Within a cultural context Funds of Knowledge, that is the talents, traditions, and abilities families possess and pass down to their children may be a context for these. However, despite their importance the value Funds of Knowledge have has not been explored with parents of children with special needs. This action research study used a mixed-methods design to understand if Funds of Knowledge could be used as context to improve communication between parents and their children and build trust between parents and a teacher. Seven families participated in the study. Quantitative data were gathered with surveys and were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Qualitative data consisted of transcripts from home-visit interviews, parent presentations, and a focus group, and were analyzed with a grounded theory approach. Results indicate parents entered the study with trust in the teacher especially in terms of having competence in her abilities. Data also show that parents used the language strategies provided to improve communication with their children. Data also indicate that the use of a Funds of Knowledge activity allowed parents to share their knowledge and interests with their children and children in the classroom, feel empowered, and express emotions. From these findings, implication for practice and further research are provided.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Integration of traditional assessment and response to intervention in psychoeducational evaluations of culturally and linguistically diverse students

Description

The popularity of response-to-intervention (RTI) frameworks of service delivery has increased in recent years. Scholars have speculated that RTI may be particularly relevant to the special education assessment process for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students, due to its suspected

The popularity of response-to-intervention (RTI) frameworks of service delivery has increased in recent years. Scholars have speculated that RTI may be particularly relevant to the special education assessment process for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students, due to its suspected utility in ruling out linguistic proficiency as the primary factor in learning difficulties. The present study explored how RTI and traditional assessment methods were integrated into the psychoeducational evaluation process for students suspected of having specific learning disabilities (SLD). The content of psychoeducational evaluation reports completed on students who were found eligible for special education services under the SLD category from 2009-2013 was analyzed. Two main research questions were addressed: how RTI influenced the psychoeducational evaluation process, and how this process differed for CLD and non-CLD students. Findings indicated variability in the incorporation of RTI in evaluation reports, with an increase across time in the tendency to reference the prereferral intervention process. However, actual RTI data was present in a minority of reports, with the inclusion of such data more common for reading than other academic areas, as well as more likely for elementary students than secondary students. Contrary to expectations, RTI did not play a larger role in evaluation reports for CLD students than reports for non-CLD students. Evaluations of CLD students also did not demonstrate greater variability in the use of traditional assessments, and were more likely to rely on nonverbal cognitive measures than evaluations of non-CLD students. Methods by which practitioners addressed linguistic proficiency were variable, with parent input, educational history, and individually-administered proficiency test data commonly used. Assessment practices identified in this study are interpreted in the context of best practice recommendations.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014