Matching Items (53)

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Giftedness and EBD: How Do We Accommodate For High School and University Students Who Have Both?

Description

Disability Resource and Counseling centers were interviewed across universities and high schools regarding how they accommodate twice exceptional students in giftedness and emotional behavioral disorders. This study highlights the services

Disability Resource and Counseling centers were interviewed across universities and high schools regarding how they accommodate twice exceptional students in giftedness and emotional behavioral disorders. This study highlights the services available to 2e students and provides effective accommodations and support solutions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Creating a Peer-Mediated Social Story for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to integrate social skills instruction in classroom settings. Social stories are designed to help a child learn and respond to social cues for successful social interactions. Although, there is limited research on the effectiveness of social stories, research has demonstrated the effectiveness of peer-mediated learning and the effects of positive peer relationships in inclusive early childhood settings. This project draws on the evidence of peer- mediated learning through the medium of social stories to support students with ASD in school settings. This project is the creation of a double-sided social story picture book designed to teach prosocial peer interactions to students with ASD and to teach their peers to support them in learning the specific social skill. The target skill for this peer-mediated social story is learning how to interact with friends in the classroom by initiating and responding to requests to play. \r\nThe project is unique in that this social story includes a section for the student with ASD and a section to support the peer in their role within the social relationship.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Systematic Literature Review Conceptualization of Inclusive Education within Arizona's Borderlands

Description

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family members. Although there is research that states along international borders are complex and diverse educational spaces, the information found regarding special education along the U.S-Mexico border mostly centers on the issue of over-representation of Mexican-American, Yaqui and Navajo students. There is validity and need to present these specific issues and groups of individuals, however there is little empirical data that involves the attitudes, perspectives and experiences of other stakeholders, such as parents, educators, and administrators who participate in special education processes, in a way that reflects education in borderlands as an asset-based setting and that engages in dialogue about across all of the disabilities categories protected under IDEA and 504 plans. Key Words: special education, parents, teachers, literature review, borderlands

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

SpecialT’s In Special Education: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

Description

Here’s the latest from my blog- Tips for Struggling Writers, sharing my knowledge on<br/>how not only special educators, but anyone can help individuals who struggle with writing. I share my

Here’s the latest from my blog- Tips for Struggling Writers, sharing my knowledge on<br/>how not only special educators, but anyone can help individuals who struggle with writing. I share my input as well as including immense research and peer reviewed articles to show my understanding of the value of education. Through my blog, one should be able to sit down and understand what makes up a special education world. My blog is the fast track version of a Special Education 101 class. As you travel through, I hope to share different tips, tricks, and techniques that you can apply in your own classroom.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Is An Enviable Life An Achievable Option for Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the United States: A Review of Literature

Description

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States can achieve an enviable life as defined. This literature review synthesizes current and historic research through an analysis of various studies on outcomes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), their families, and the resources offered within community platforms to help create such a life for young adults with IDD. This review also aims to help change society’s views on young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and challenges the community to address this issue further in order to create a more accessible, enviable, and inclusive lifestyle for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Use of Music for the Inclusivity of Autistic Children

Description

One obstacle which children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) face when learning in a public-school environment is the lack of feeling included when learning. In this study, the term inclusion

One obstacle which children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) face when learning in a public-school environment is the lack of feeling included when learning. In this study, the term inclusion refers to time that children with ASDs spend in general education settings, interacting and/or engaging with neurotypical students and teachers. Inclusion can help students with ASDs improve their social skills, as well as academic achievement, mental health, and future success (Camargo et al., 2014). Since children with ASDs often have difficulties with social interaction skills, this can prevent their successful inclusion in general education placements. Music is a type of behaviorally-based intervention, which has proven to be effective in helping students develop the skills necessary to be successfully included, and because it is a type of activity which can serve as a bit of a distraction from the social aspect of the interaction, it can help children practice social skills and interact in a comfortable way. This study examines how music is used in public school settings to help foster the skills necessary for autistic children to be involved in standard school curriculums in order to allow them to receive the full benefits from learning in a general education setting. This study was conducted by reviewing past literature on the benefits of inclusion in special education, the benefits of music for children with ASDs, and the difference in efficacy of music interventions when conducted in an inclusive setting. Interviews with special education teachers, music educators, and music therapists were also conducted to address examples of the impact of music in this research area. The study found that music is beneficial in allowing more students to be included in standard school curriculums, and data showed the trend that inclusion positively affected their social and academic development.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Inclusive Band: Music Learning for Students with Special Needs

Description

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the start until Spring 2019 when there was a shift in membership. This caused the Peer Mentors to have to move to new groups. Some moved to a Music Student that played the same instrument while others were because a member graduated or left Inclusive Band and were replaced by new members. This transition was hard for both Peer Mentors and Music Students. The Music Students were used to their Peer Mentors and built a strong friendship with them. Losing them was hard and some still struggle with it several months later. The Peer Mentors also had difficulties adjusting to teaching a different Music Student. They did not know their strengths and weaknesses or the best way to teach them. This challenge led to the creation of the handbook, which is a guide for future members of Inclusive Band to aid with the transition from semester to semester.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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A college entrance essay exam intervention for students with disabilities and struggling writers: a randomized control trial

Description

High school students with high-incidence disabilities and struggling writers face considerable challenges when taking high-stakes writing assessments designed to examine their suitability for entrance to college. I examined the effectiveness

High school students with high-incidence disabilities and struggling writers face considerable challenges when taking high-stakes writing assessments designed to examine their suitability for entrance to college. I examined the effectiveness of a writing intervention for improving these students’ performance on a popular college entrance exam, the writing assessment for the ACT. Students were taught a planning and composing strategy for successfully taking this test using the Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model. A randomized control trial was conducted where 20 high school students were randomly assigned to a treatment (N = 10) or control (N = 10) condition. Control students received ACT math preparation. SRSD instruction statistically enhanced students’ planning, the quality of their written text (including ideas and analysis, development and support, organization, and language use), the inclusion of argumentative elements in their compositions, and the use of transition words in written text. Limitations of the study, future research, and implications for practice are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Body-Chair: The Entangled Relationship between a Girl and Her Wheelchair

Description

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between an adolescent girl with an orthopedic impairment and her wheelchair. The study looked at the relationship of a high

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between an adolescent girl with an orthopedic impairment and her wheelchair. The study looked at the relationship of a high school female and how she views her wheelchair as a separate entity and not an extension of her body. This study also looked at how the relationship with her wheelchair had a profound influence on how she self-identified, as a “normal girl” and refuted the disability identity that was assigned her. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) states that there are about 6.7 million children in the U.S. with some type of a disability (NCES, 2019). Out of that number in the year 2015-16, there was a relatively small number of children with orthopedic impairments (i.e. 1% or 67,000). Approximately 16,640 of that number are females (NCES, 2019, OSEP, 2018, U.S. Department of Education, 2019). The NCES concludes that there are 0.8 percent of females between the ages of 3-22 that participate in some type of special education program at a public school in the Unites States.

This study moved away from the traditional humanist lens (human v nature) and instead employed new materialist and post humanist theoretical frameworks to explore the entangled material reality of the body-chair relationship. Exploring the body-chair relationship through a material discursive approach allowed for data to be read and re-read exploring the relationality between self and matter. The participant of the study refuted the notion to claim disability due to her ability to perform acts typical of a high school female (e.g. engage in social media, ride public transportation independently).

The results of the study suggest that a disability identity is multifaceted and diverse in similar ways, as are the people with impairments and disabilities. This dissertation provides the opening for further research to explore the disability identity and is not the final word. The relationality between self and matter is entangled with social discourse on what it means to be disabled. Questions not easily answered: Who gets to claim disability? Who does not? The implications for educations are numerous and profound.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Learning Disabilities or Language Proficiency? Mapping a School’s Understanding of English Learners’ (In)competence

Description

Special education identification processes related to English language learners (ELs) in the United States have puzzled the field for decades. The phenomenon of referrals, the first step toward identification, is

Special education identification processes related to English language learners (ELs) in the United States have puzzled the field for decades. The phenomenon of referrals, the first step toward identification, is complex since it requires deciphering the root cause of students’ learning struggles—e.g., second language (L2) factors, the possibility of a learning disability (LD), or the combination of multiple other influences. To investigate the various influences contributing to learning difficulties, I centered this study on three potential sources, individual, institutional, and interpersonal. I aimed to answer, how did sociocultural influences mediate a teacher’s understanding of ELs’ competence? How did sociocultural influences mediate whether a teacher referred ELs to special education services? Using a cultural-historical theoretical approach, I sought deeper theoretical and empirical understandings into how institutional factors (e.g., tiered intervention contexts, policies), combined with other influences, mediated ELs’ referral decisions. I used a multiple parallel case study design following two fifth-grade ELs who faced the possibility of a referral. Interested in the interpersonal domain (e.g., interactions and communication among people), I zoomed in to a local process, student-teacher conferences to examine how classroom processes shaped teachers’ thoughts of students’ competence, and ultimately, referral decisions. I video-recorded teacher-student conference sessions over 14 weeks, and audio-recorded viewing sessions of the recorded conferences to understand teacher and student interpretations of learning competence. To understand how other dimensions (individual and institutional) contributed to teachers’ overall views about the student competence, I interviewed parents and school personnel, wrote observational field notes, and examined archival documents related to student learning over the entire fifth-grade year. I used inductive and iterative qualitative analytical approaches to craft the findings. My findings reaffirmed the complexity involved in finalizing ELs’ referral decisions. I found cultural factors intertwined with structural forces, driving students’ special education candidacies in divergent directions: one evaluated (LD); the other, retained. I also found the referral decisions were based on narrow understandings of learning and behaviors, lack of attention to students’ L2 needs, and faulty and overpowering structural forces which undermined teacher’s professional opinions about the referrals. These findings have implications for research, practice, and policy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020