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The Untold History of a World War II Bride

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The old adage that "history is written by the winners" ought to be expanded to "history is written by the male winners." The stories of women have long been denied legitimacy in the public sphere, and often live on only

The old adage that "history is written by the winners" ought to be expanded to "history is written by the male winners." The stories of women have long been denied legitimacy in the public sphere, and often live on only in the form of oral histories, lost with the last breath of the last listener. The histories of war brides are among those most easily overlooked and forgotten as the triumphs and failures of their men in battle take precedence over their own stories of bravery and grief. As the generation of women who survived the horror of World War II is dying off, it is imperative that their passions, sorrows, and life lessons do not die with them. These women were left at home as their husbands went off to an uncertain future at war, many assuming numerous new duties in an effort to keep everything on the home front functioning. War brides have been documented as a wartime phenomena in the chapters of history, but they are confined to a label that limits the roles they play in history. These women married the men of America's "Greatest Generation," but were not deemed fit to belong to it themselves. Through the oral history of Ingrid Hoitzerouth Adamson, accompanied by the real life accounts of women in similar situations, a new light can be shed on what it means to be a war bride.

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2015-05