Matching Items (11)

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Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi

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“Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi” analyzes archival research, publications, and oral histories to ma

“Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi” analyzes archival research, publications, and oral histories to map the generational progression of Japanese and Okinawan Americans in Hawaiʻi toward the American dream. The American dream and its meaning are questioned, particularly with regards to first generation experiences and the cultural shedding required for acceptance into American society. “Okage Sama De” is a saying that refers to the generational succession and accumulated wealth of Japanese and Okinawan Americans in Hawaiʻi, which these groups attribute their privileged position in society to. Although the strong emphasis placed on the hardships their ancestors overcame and on values like hard work allow members of this group to justify their privilege, the true origin of this privilege lies in the upward mobility afforded to them after World War II.

This work also explores how Japanese and Okinawans have maintained aspects of their culture and recreated their own distinct histories, particularly in Hawaiʻi. It analyzes how the Japanese and Okinawan communities have worked to preserve aspects of culture in Hawaiʻi and how their efforts have been received. Emphasis is placed on the third and fourth generations and how they have recreated their histories, particularly since many of them are largely Americanized. Furthermore, a critical lens is placed on the relationship between Japanese and Okinawans, who are often lumped together by larger society, to extract a better understanding of their historical and cultural differences. There is also analysis on how Japanese discrimination against Okinawans manifested in Hawaiʻi and what effect this had on each generation.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Japanese & American Popular Culture: Heroism and Morality

Description

In the current age, with media influence spreading through the entire world, formerly isolated regions and gated cultures became interconnected. With this globalization of culture came the communion between Japanese

In the current age, with media influence spreading through the entire world, formerly isolated regions and gated cultures became interconnected. With this globalization of culture came the communion between Japanese and Western media, especially animation and comics. Morality is often exemplified by heroes within a particular culture as figures for audiences to admire and draw values from, which can be a useful representation of that society's particular standards. The cultures' portrayal of heroism and morality through characterization and plot structure are emblematic not only of their original culture, but the new age of globalization as concepts previously considered unique to one region soon blended together through the world. From the Western "Hero's Journey" style mythos to the Japanese anime and manga heroes of the modern decades, we can see the growth and impact of globalization which caused new blends of portrayals and themes in revolutionary ways. The roots of the differences were found through research of popular culture and history of Japanese animation and Western comic books. Iconic Western comic book heroes such as Superman, Batman, and Wolverine are analyzed, followed by analysis and comparison to the Japanese parallel of the Japanese hero, specifically within Hirohiko Araki's acclaimed Jojo's Bizarre Adventure anime and manga franchise. Finally, the popular animated Western cartoon Avatar: The Last Airbender, known for its vast Eastern influence, meet the two worlds in the middle and epitomize the globalization of this concept of a hero's narrative. The purpose of this analysis is to understand the dynamics of cultural influence and cultural specificity, elucidating some stereotypes in contemporary culture brought by misconceptions and traditions in order to promote cross-cultural understanding.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

Deconstructing and Recreating Japanese Variety Television

Description

While studying in Japan, I became fascinated by the variety shows my roommates would watch. These shows featured a flexible format with comedians and other entertainers participating in a wide

While studying in Japan, I became fascinated by the variety shows my roommates would watch. These shows featured a flexible format with comedians and other entertainers participating in a wide variety of activities. For my senior creative project, I decided to determine what features were essential to Japanese variety shows, and to then use these features to create my own program.
In order to determine the essential features of Japanese variety television, I watched a total of 22 episodes of three popular Japanese variety shows: Gaki no tsukai ya arahende (ダウンタウンのガキの使いやあらへんで! Usually abbreviated as ガキの使い), London Hearts (ロンドンハーツ), and Utaban (うたばん). I chose these three shows because of their differing styles, popular comedic hosts, and impressive longevity, with a combined 58 years of runtime. Through my research, I was able to assemble the analyses of basic and technical features found in the next section of this document in addition to several pages of my own notes used to design my original program.
My own program, American Joke (アメリカンジョーク), is meant to be filmed in America featuring an entirely Japanese cast. The main idea of the show is to capitalize on the comedic potential of cultural differences by having Japanese comedians interact with American people and traditions.
In order to showcase the show, I filmed a short “sizzle reel” video featuring Japanese exchange students as the cast. Segments filmed included our “comedians” learning the high jump from ASU track athletes, bringing Japanese fermented soybeans to campus for American students to taste, and participating in an American-themed quiz show.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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On Effective Instruction of the Japanese Relative Clause

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This study was designed to test a new method of instruction for Japanese language students' re-acquisition of the Japanese relative clause structure. 10 Japanese language students who had already been

This study was designed to test a new method of instruction for Japanese language students' re-acquisition of the Japanese relative clause structure. 10 Japanese language students who had already been exposed to the Japanese relative clause in their previous semester were asked to take a pretest that assessed their (a) knowledge of basic grammar concepts such as a "subject" and "predicate," (b) their ability to apply those basic grammar concepts to the Japanese language, and (c) their grasp of the rules applying to the formation of the Japanese relative clause. Students were then placed into a control group containing 6 students and an experimental group containing four students. The experimental group received additional lessons consisting of explicit instruction of basic grammar in both Japanese and English, as well as basic noun relativization rules in each language. The study found that the explicit instruction helped student comprehension of the relative clause structure, although some difficulties remain in identifying the relative clause and in constructing it on their own.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane"

Description

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane" will introduce the reader to scenes from my study abroad at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. The reader will experience the whirlwind nature

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane" will introduce the reader to scenes from my study abroad at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. The reader will experience the whirlwind nature of study abroad, the complexity of Japanese culture, and vicarious nostalgia for a place, time, and group of people now far removed from my daily life. I invite you to join me on this journey into my time in a different world. (Please note: turn on "comments" in the pdf file.)

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Once Upon a Midnight Dreary: A Study of Cross-Cultural Gothic Fairytales

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In my thesis paper, I examine the gothic elements found in classical gothic fairy tales from European and Japanese tradition, particularly those works by the Brothers Grimm and Yei Theodora

In my thesis paper, I examine the gothic elements found in classical gothic fairy tales from European and Japanese tradition, particularly those works by the Brothers Grimm and Yei Theodora Ozaki. By examining the principle gothic elements that are unique to both stories, and further analyzing the commonalities of story, plot, and other major tropes, a better understanding of the message meant to be imparted and other cultural nuances can be ascertained. Gothic literature creates an atmosphere of gloom and suspense, toying with concepts of dread and darkness by employing Gothic elements such as shadows, the supernatural, sinister buildings, and strong-willed villains, all of which affect the rational mind in an irrational way. Fairytales freely use such tropes to their advantage, playing with the many fears of children, while simultaneously painting an idealistic fantasy world. The degree of usage and the application of gothic elements is closely examined in the Grimm works, "Hansel and Gretel," and "The Robber Bridegroom," as well as the Japanese tales, "The Goblin of Adachigahra,""Kintaro the Golden Boy" and "The Monkey and the Crab." These stories have been chosen due for their usage of animal tricksters, themes of control, and aspects of isolation, supernatural entities, and substantial gothic imagery. The gothic elements of death, sinister older women, the supernatural, fears of abandonment, and cunning animals are akin to both Western and Eastern tales, while the concept of gothic setting and the type of monsters prepared to feast on men is significantly different for both cultures, similar lessons are intended to be gleaned by children from these tales, with the intention of generally producing positive results \u2014 while the means differ, the message is strikingly similar, yet there remain cultural differences in terms of central themes and character traits.The effect of re-introducing the darker, gothic elements of traditional fairy tales into modern literature and retellings of the original narratives has been profound.Today, whether it has been at the bequest of the public or simply a new-age movement by modern cinema audience for the "gritty and realistic," fairy tales are returning to their former gothic forms. "Snow White and The Huntsman" is one example of a film which has gone this route, opting for a more gothic, classic telling rather than the chip, cheery, rosy cheeked Disney versions. There is a tendency for most media nowadays to be far less censored and fantastical, aiming for a more realistic, grittier approach \u2014 this bleeds into film and literature likewise, and thus children are impacted by this shift as well. Children seem to be able to handle more, perhaps desensitized at younger and younger ages by the products of our widely consumerist society, or perhaps due to parents raising their children in such a way so that the darkness that tinges these tales doesn't disturb and derail but rather, emphasizes their meaning of teaching certain lessons. Tales such as these are still valuable, and will continue to be so long as we seek a reality greater than our own, where the evil of the world is wiped away, and we all live happily ever after.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Kokuji: Script and Identity in Japan

Description

Kokuji are a specific type of character, or Sinograph, present in Japanese script. Kokuji are differentiated from “normal” Sinographs in Japanese, kanji, by the origin. Kokuji are Sinographs of Japanese

Kokuji are a specific type of character, or Sinograph, present in Japanese script. Kokuji are differentiated from “normal” Sinographs in Japanese, kanji, by the origin. Kokuji are Sinographs of Japanese origin while other kanji in Japanese are of Chinese origin. The purpose of this paper was to explore how this kind of character has changed since it was first identified and the implications these changes have on Japanese identity. This essay is split into three chapters past the introduction. The first chapter explains the terminology used in the rest of the paper, how Sinographs work, and explores similar phenomena in other scripts. The second chapter focuses on the status of kokuji during two periods of Japanese history, the Edo period (1603-1868) and the Meiji period (1868-1912). The Edo period is relevant because during this period kokuji were first recognized as entities separate from normal kanji. The Meiji period is important because it marks the shift into modern Japan, and it started the linguistic and orthographic reforms that would continue until the late twentieth century. The last chapter takes a closer look at the linguistic reforms that took place during the Taishō period and the Shōwa periods. The Taishō period has Japan still trying to become a “modern” nation and continues some of the language reform from the Meiji period. The Shōwa period post-World War II enacts many of the language reforms that shape modern Japanese language. Through these linguistic reforms we can figure out why kokuji have fallen out of use and why the remaining ones are somewhat common.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The four-woman concert in Genji monogatari: a window into Heian musical performance and teaching

Description

Japanese literature of the Heian Era (794-1185) abounds with references to musical instruments and episodes of performance. This thesis provides some insight into that music by translating sections of the

Japanese literature of the Heian Era (794-1185) abounds with references to musical instruments and episodes of performance. This thesis provides some insight into that music by translating sections of the "Wakana II" (Spring Shoots II) chapter of the early 11th-century novel Genji monogatari (The Tale of Genji). It explains the musical references and shows how, in the context of the novel, musical performance, musical teaching, and interpersonal relationships were inextricably intertwined. Detailed appendices provide background on traditional Japanese musical instruments, musical theory, and related subjects.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Explaining Fukushima to children: a cross-cultural study of bodily functions as metaphor in Japanese

Description

This research proposes that a cross-cultural disconnect exists between Japanese and American English in the realm of bodily functions used as metaphor. Perhaps nowhere is this notion illustrated more clearly

This research proposes that a cross-cultural disconnect exists between Japanese and American English in the realm of bodily functions used as metaphor. Perhaps nowhere is this notion illustrated more clearly than by a cartoon that was inspired by recent tragic events in Japan. In the afternoon of Friday, March 11, 2011, the northeast coast of Japan was struck by a massive earthquake and tsunami that caused immeasurable loss of life and property and catastrophic damage to the nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture. In the immediate wake of these events, Japanese artist Hachiya Kazuhiko, determined to make the situation comprehensible to children, created a cartoon in which he anthropomorphized the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor and likened the dangers associated with it to illness and bodily functions. This cartoon garnered considerable notoriety, both in Japan and abroad. The reactions of English speakers appeared to differ from those of Japanese speakers, suggesting the existence of a possible cross-cultural disconnect. This research into the reactions to the cartoon and other relevant literature (both in English and Japanese), viewed against federal regulations regarding the broadcast of "obscenity" in the United States, commentary on American society, and how the use of similar language in American cartoons is seen, clearly indicates that negative attitudes toward the use of bodily functions as metaphor exist in the United States, while the same usage is seen differently in Japan.

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Date Created
  • 2012