Matching Items (3)

Traditional Gujarati Recipes from my Grandmother's Home Kitchen

Description

The goal of this creative project is to document my grandmother’s traditional Gujarati recipes with the hopes of preserving her life and passion for cooking. This process included library research

The goal of this creative project is to document my grandmother’s traditional Gujarati recipes with the hopes of preserving her life and passion for cooking. This process included library research to investigate the history of Indian and Gujarati cuisine, spending time in the kitchen documenting the recipes in their entirety, practicing them on my own, writing the cookbook and including passages that weave in the history, my grandmother’s stories, and techniques and tools. After completing this process, the significant findings related to my grandmother’s life and her journey from birth to now. Her marriage to my grandfather at a young age, her journey and those who influenced her ability to cook, and her impact on my family were all effects that I had understood and known during my experiences with my grandmother. In this journey, I learned more about her thoughts and experiences that I never knew before. Our relationship has deepened ten-fold and while she may not be with me forever, I now have a tangible part of her that I can keep with me for the rest of my life.

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  • 2019-05

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Food as a Vehicle to Break Down Racial Barriers

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This thesis explores the power of food to transcend cultural and racial borders and to act as a common ground, bringing people of all different backgrounds together. Through globalization, there

This thesis explores the power of food to transcend cultural and racial borders and to act as a common ground, bringing people of all different backgrounds together. Through globalization, there is an increased movement of people from their homeland to different regions around the world and with this migration comes the spread of their culture and cuisine to new areas. This spreading of culture often creates friction and tension amongst other cultures, however as this thesis argues, with increased diversity, there is the great potential for greater interaction with other cultures and therefore greater appreciation. The key aspect of this thesis is the ways in which food can be used as a tool to overcome racial barriers and serve as a means of positive expression of a culture. I hope to show that by engaging with a culture through its cuisine, one can arguably build a greater appreciation for that culture and therefore lower their preconceived notions and stereotypes.

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  • 2019-05

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Cibola breadstuff: foodways and social transformation in the Cibola region A.D. 1150-1400

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Foodways in societies at every social scale are linked in complex ways to processes of social change. This dissertation explores the interrelationship between foodways and processes of rapid social transformation.

Foodways in societies at every social scale are linked in complex ways to processes of social change. This dissertation explores the interrelationship between foodways and processes of rapid social transformation. Drawing on a wide range of archaeological and ethnographic data from the Cibola region, I examine the role of foodways in processes of population aggregation and community formation and address how changes in the scale and diversity of social life interacted with the scale and organization of food production and consumption practices. To address the interrelationships between foodways and social transformations, I employ a conceptual framework focused on two social dimensions of food: cuisine and commensality. This study comparatively examines cuisine and commensality through time by investigating a range of interrelated food activities including: food production, storage, preparation, cooking, consumption and discard.

While settlement patterns and other more obvious manifestations of aggregation have been studied frequently, by examining foodways during periods of aggregation and social reorganization this study provides new insights into the micro-scalar processes of social transformation, cuisine change, and economic intensification associated with increases in settlement size, density, and social diversity. I document how food production and preparation intensified in conjunction with increases in the size of settlements and the scale of communal commensal events. I argue that foodways were a critical aspect of the social work of establishing and maintaining large, dense communities in the 13th and 14th centuries. At the same time, widespread changes in commensal practices placed a larger burden on household surplus and labor and women were likely the most affected as maize flatbreads and other foods made with finely ground flour were adopted and became central to cuisine. As such, this study provides insights into how rapid social transformations in the late 13th and 14th centuries were experienced differently by individuals, particularly along gendered lines. Studies of foodways, and specifically the social dimensions of food, offer a promising and often underutilized source of information about past processes of population aggregation, social integration, and transformations in the political economies of small-scale societies the past.

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  • 2019