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Architectural Insertions Balancing Social Inequities in Underprivileged Communities

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The purpose of this text is to research and specify inequities present within three South American cities; Medellin, Columbia, Mexico City, Mexico, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This research then considers specific neighborhoods within these cities that have become underprivileged

The purpose of this text is to research and specify inequities present within three South American cities; Medellin, Columbia, Mexico City, Mexico, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This research then considers specific neighborhoods within these cities that have become underprivileged as a result of the inequities, and analyzes architectural insertions that have been placed in these communities in hopes of balancing the inequities secluding the communities from the rest of the city. With the information gathered from the three case study cities, another city, Tijuana, Mexico, is examined and ascertained as to what type of inequities are present. Using the methodology implemented in the case studies, a specific architectural insertion is proposed in relation to the problems at hand, with the intent of balancing the inequalities present in an underprivilege neighborhood in Tijuana. Ultimately, the text strives to demonstrate the power of architectural insertions within a community, while highlighting the importance of the effects upon the daily lives of the inhabitants, as well as the dynamics within the community and greater city.

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2018-05

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SOCIAL CONFLICT AND WATER ACCESS IN MEXICO CITY'S URBAN WATER NETWORK

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Protest has been both a practice of citizenship rights as well as a means of social pressure for change in the context of Mexico City's water system. This paper explores the role that citizen protest plays in the city's response

Protest has been both a practice of citizenship rights as well as a means of social pressure for change in the context of Mexico City's water system. This paper explores the role that citizen protest plays in the city's response to its water challenges. We use media reports of water protests to examine where protests happen and the causes associated with them. We analyze this information to illuminate socio-political issues associated with the city's water problems, such as political corruption, gentrification, as well as general power dynamics and lack of transparency between citizens, governments, and the private businesses which interact with them. We use text analysis of newspaper reports to analyze protest events in terms of the primary stimuli of water conflict, the areas within the city more prone to conflict, and the ways in which conflict and protest are used to initiate improved water management and to influence decision making to address water inequities. We found that water scarcity is the primary source of conflict, and that water scarcity is tied to new housing and commercial construction. These new constructions often disrupt water supplies and displace of minority or marginalized groups, which we denote as gentrification. The project demonstrates the intimate ties between inequities in housing and water in urban development. Key words: Conflict, protest, Mexico City, scarcity, new construction

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2017-05