Matching Items (6)

MELT: An Experimental Short Film About Time

Description

Time is an important issue for most of us, and as we grow older, we become increasingly aware of it. We save it, waste it, spend it, value it, and somehow never have enough of it. It’s something we are

Time is an important issue for most of us, and as we grow older, we become increasingly aware of it. We save it, waste it, spend it, value it, and somehow never have enough of it. It’s something we are all familiar with and pay attention to, yet is difficult to define and understand. It simultaneously acts as our limitation and our opportunity, and serves as the invisible but all powerful dimension that limits our reality to happening only one event at a given time and place. The limitations of time force us to make active choices on how we spend it. This simple fact causes time to have a very influential and significant role in our lives. Due to this, each one of us begins to form a unique relationship with time that has an enormous impact on how we live our lives. As we grow mindful of our consciousness and the timelessness of the present, our psychological time seemingly disappears. We can begin to see time not only as something we cannot control, but also as a tool that helps us live our lives to the fullest. Time’s three main domains of past, present, and future all provide their own set of opportunities and obstacles. These domains act as types of lenses through which we see the world, ultimately forming our time perspective. During my junior year, I became increasingly aware of my relationship with these domains of time, and realized that the majority of my stress, anxiety, and fear stemmed from either dwelling on the past or worrying about the future. Moreover, that kind of time perspective had a negative impact on my life and wellbeing. I was inspired to make a change in my life by living more in the present, appreciating every little moment and acknowledging who and where I am today. For this thesis creative project, I created an experimental short film that represents the essence of time and its presence in our lives. The overall goal was to inspire others to reflect on their own perception of time, and inspire them to be more present and appreciate every moment in their lives. Writing, directing, producing, and filming this film on my own required an extensive pre-production process of writing, drafting, securing locations and coordinating schedules. Setting deadlines, being open to surprises, and learning quickly is what made this production successful. The entire process from forming the idea to pre-production, production, and post-production allowed me to grow and develop immensely as a filmmaker and creative storyteller.

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Date Created
2019-05

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House of Leaves: The Evolution of the Experimental Narrative

Description

Experimentation is as vital to literature as it is to the sciences. Experimentation through narrative is an evolutionary process that develops the art of storytelling through changing mediums, formats and forms of linearity. Challenging conceptual norms of narrative has resulted

Experimentation is as vital to literature as it is to the sciences. Experimentation through narrative is an evolutionary process that develops the art of storytelling through changing mediums, formats and forms of linearity. Challenging conceptual norms of narrative has resulted in a new genre characterized by interactive nonconventional structures, and the necessity of reading with nontrivial effort. The term ergodic was applied to literature first in Espen J. Aarseths 1997 study Cybertext: Perspectives on Ergodic Literature. In its simplest terms, ergodic literature requires nontrivial effort to transverse the text, as opposed to nonergodic literature, which would be the majority of traditionally formatted and conventionally read literature that requires no extraneous responsibilities of the reader (Aarseth, 1997). The qualities that necessitate a heightened requirement of nontrivial effort vary widely. Literary works like Doug Dorst’s Ship of Theseus (2013) integrates supplemental materials, and notes transcribed in the margins connected to the multiple narratives within the actual pages of the book. Some books such as Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves (2000) utilize coded messages and hidden information that contribute to the atmosphere of the narrative. These intricacies enclose information that constructs a veritable labyrinth, containing details and material not easily found but ultimately pivotal to the comprehension of the text. And while completion may be a goal of the standard text, it may never even be intended for works such as these. Throughout this discussion I intend to contest that House of Leaves is an apex of literature and experimental narrative. Furthermore, I will highlight the importance of experimentation in narratives and its role in the development of various modes and mediums while analyzing prominent works and themes that fall under the category of experimental narrative or ergodic literature.

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2019-05

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Real-time composer-performer collaboration as explored in Wilderness, a dance and audio installation

Description

From fall 2010 to spring 2011, the author was the pianist in twenty public performances of Wilderness, a site-adaptable dance and audio installation by choreographer Yanira Castro and composer Stephan Moore. Wilderness's music was generated as the result of an

From fall 2010 to spring 2011, the author was the pianist in twenty public performances of Wilderness, a site-adaptable dance and audio installation by choreographer Yanira Castro and composer Stephan Moore. Wilderness's music was generated as the result of an algorithmic treatment of data collected from the movements of both dancers and audience members within the performance space. The immediacy of using movement to instantaneously generate sounds resulted in the need for a real-time notational environment inhabited by a sight-reading musician. Wilderness provided the author the opportunity to extensively explore an extreme sight-reading environment, as well as the experience of playing guided improvisations over existing materials while incorporating lateral thinking strategies, resulting from a real-time collaboration between composer and performer during the course of a live performance. This paper describes Wilderness in detail with particular attention focused on aspects of the work that most directly affect the pianist: the work's real-time notational system, live interaction between composer and performer, and the freedoms and limitations of guided improvisation. There is a significant amount of multi-media documentation of Wilderness available online, and the reader is directed toward this online content in the paper's appendix.

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Date Created
2012

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A "",field_main_title:"reasonable reader of poetry's" briefed introduction: a Sam Harris application on the lack of authorship in poetry and poems

Description

The following thesis document entitled, "A 'Reasonable Reader of Poetry's' Briefed Introduction: A Sam Harris Application on the Lack of Authorship in Poetry and Poems" explores the concept of writing itself applied to the world of poetry. This document uses

The following thesis document entitled, "A 'Reasonable Reader of Poetry's' Briefed Introduction: A Sam Harris Application on the Lack of Authorship in Poetry and Poems" explores the concept of writing itself applied to the world of poetry. This document uses Sam Harris' critique and redefinition of free will as an illusion applied to authorship and the concept of self within poetry. This thesis upholds Sam Harris' application of the illusion of free will against and within conventions of experimental poetry to do with the persona poem, deviated syntax, memory, Confessionalist poetry, and so on. The document pulls in examples from Modernist poetry, Confessionalist poetry, prose poetry, contemporary poetry, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetry, and experimental poetry. This thesis ends with the conclusion that further research needs to be done with regard to how this lack of authorship applies to copyright law within the poetry field.

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Date Created
2015

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Experimental study of the role of grain size in erosion of bedrock channels by abrasion

Description

The morphology of mountainous areas is strongly influenced by stream bed incision rates, but most studies of landscape evolution consider erosion at basin scales or larger. The research here attempts to understand the smaller-scale mechanics of erosion on exposed bedrock

The morphology of mountainous areas is strongly influenced by stream bed incision rates, but most studies of landscape evolution consider erosion at basin scales or larger. The research here attempts to understand the smaller-scale mechanics of erosion on exposed bedrock channels in the conceptual framework of an established saltation-abrasion model by Sklar and Dietrich [2004]. The recirculating flume used in this experiment allows independent control of bed slope, water discharge rate, sediment flux, and sediment grain size – all factors often bundled together in simple models of river incision and typically cross-correlated in natural settings. This study investigates the mechanics of erosion on exposed bedrock channels caused by abrasion of transported particles. Of particular interest are saltating particles, as well as sediment near the threshold between saltation and suspension - sediment vigorously transported but with significant interaction with the bed. The size of these erosive tools are varied over an order of magnitude in mean grain diameter, including a sand of D¬50 = 0.56 mm, and three gravel sizes of 3.39, 4.63, and 5.88 mm. Special consideration was taken to prevent any flow conditions that created a persistent alluvial cover. The erodible concrete substrate is fully exposed at all times during experiments reported here. Rates of erosion into the concrete substrate (a bedrock proxy) were measured by comparing topographic data before and after each experimental run, made possible by a precision laser mounted on a high speed computer-controlled cart. The experimental flume was able to produce flow discharge as high as 75 liters per second, sediment fluxes (of many varieties) up to 215 grams per second, and bed slopes up to 10%. I find a general positive correlation is found between erosion rate and bed slope, shear stress, grain size, and sediment flux.

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Date Created
2016

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The Possible Photochemical Origins of Banded Iron Formations

Description

Banded iron formations (BIFs) are among the earliest possible indicators for oxidation of the Archean biosphere. However, the origin of BIFs remains debated. Proposed formation mechanisms include oxidation of Fe(II) by O2 (Cloud, 1973), photoferrotrophy (Konhauser et al., 2002), and

Banded iron formations (BIFs) are among the earliest possible indicators for oxidation of the Archean biosphere. However, the origin of BIFs remains debated. Proposed formation mechanisms include oxidation of Fe(II) by O2 (Cloud, 1973), photoferrotrophy (Konhauser et al., 2002), and abiotic UV photooxidation (Braterman et al., 1983; Konhauser et al., 2007). Resolving this debate could help determine whether BIFs are really indicators of O2, biological activity, or neither.

To examine the viability of abiotic UV photooxidation of Fe, laboratory experiments were conducted in which Fe-bearing solutions were irradiated with different regions of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and Fe oxidation and precipitation were measured. The goal was to revisit previous experiments that obtained conflicting results, and extend these experiments by using a realistic bicarbonate buffered solution and a xenon (Xe) lamp to better match the solar spectrum and light intensity.

In experiments reexamining previous work, Fe photooxidation and precipitation was observed. Using a series of wavelength cut-off filters, the reaction was determined not to be caused by light > 345 nm. Experiments using a bicarbonate buffered solution, simulating natural waters, and using unbuffered solutions, as in prior work showed the same wavelength sensitivity. In an experiment with a Xe lamp and realistic concentrations of Archean [Fe(II)], Fe precipitation was observed in hours, demonstrating the ability for photooxidation to occur significantly in a simulated natural setting.

These results lead to modeled Fe photooxidation rates of 25 mg Fe cm-2 yr-1—near the low end of published BIF deposition rates, which range from 9 mg Fe cm-2 yr-1 to as high as 254 mg Fe cm-2 yr-1 (Konhauser et al., 2002; Trendall and Blockley, 1970). Because the rates are on the edge and the model has unquantified, favorable assumptions, these results suggest that photooxidation could contribute to, but might not be completely responsible for, large rapidly deposited BIFs such those in the Hamersley Basin. Further work is needed to improve the model and test photooxidation with other solution components. Though possibly unable to fully explain BIFs, UV light has significant oxidizing power, so the importance of photooxidation in the Archean as an environmental process and its impact on paleoredox proxies need to be determined.

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Date Created
2017