Matching Items (14)

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Design and Testing of a Low-Cost Force Sensor for a Small Robotic Manipulator

Description

This thesis details the process of developing a force feedback system for a small robotic manipulator in order to prevent damage to manipulators and the objects they are grasping, which

This thesis details the process of developing a force feedback system for a small robotic manipulator in order to prevent damage to manipulators and the objects they are grasping, which is a desired feature in many autonomous robots. This includes the research, design, fabrication, and testing of a custom force-sensing resistor and a custom set of jaws to implement the feedback system on. In order to complete this project, extensive research went to designing and building test beds for the commercial and custom force sensors to determine if force values could even be obtained. Then the sensors were implemented on a manipulator and were evaluated for ease of use during assembly and testing, accuracy, and repeatability of results using a test bed designed during the course of this research. Afterwards the custom jaws were designed and fabricated based on problems encountered during testing with the initial set of jaws. The new jaws were then tested on the test bed with the sensors and the force feedback system was implemented on it. The overall system was then evaluated for any current limitations and improvements that could be made in the future to further develop this research and assist with its implementation on other robots. The results of this experiment show that a low-cost force sensor that is easy to mass produce can be implemented on an autonomous robot to add force feedback capabilities to it. It is hopeful that the results from the experiments conducted are implemented on robotic manipulators so the area of force sensing technologies research can be expanded upon and improved.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Mathematical Modeling of the YAP/TAZ Pathways

Description

YAP/TAZ is the key effector in the Hippo pathway, but it is also involved in many other regulatory pathways to control tissue and organ size. To better understand its regulation

YAP/TAZ is the key effector in the Hippo pathway, but it is also involved in many other regulatory pathways to control tissue and organ size. To better understand its regulation and effects in tumorigenesis and degeneration, a preliminary feedback network was created with the species YAP/TAZ, phosphorylated YAP/TAZ, LATS, miR-130a, VGLL4, and β-catenin. From this network a set of ordinary differential equations were written and analyzed for parameter effects. A model showing the healthy, tumorigenic, and degenerative states was created and preliminary parameter analysis identified the effects of parameter modifications on the overall levels of YAP/TAZ. Further analysis is required and connections with the underlying biology should continue to be pursued to better understand how parameter modifications could improve disease treatments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Web-Based Programming Grading Assistant: An Investigation of the Role of Students Reviewing Behavior

Description

Paper assessment remains to be an essential formal assessment method in today's classes. However, it is difficult to track student learning behavior on physical papers. This thesis presents a new

Paper assessment remains to be an essential formal assessment method in today's classes. However, it is difficult to track student learning behavior on physical papers. This thesis presents a new educational technology—Web Programming Grading Assistant (WPGA). WPGA not only serves as a grading system but also a feedback delivery tool that connects paper-based assessments to digital space. I designed a classroom study and collected data from ASU computer science classes. I tracked and modeled students' reviewing and reflecting behaviors based on the use of WPGA. I analyzed students' reviewing efforts, in terms of frequency, timing, and the associations with their academic performances. Results showed that students put extra emphasis in reviewing prior to the exams and the efforts demonstrated the desire to review formal assessments regardless of if they were graded for academic performance or for attendance. In addition, all students paid more attention on reviewing quizzes and exams toward the end of semester.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Distinguishing emergent and sequential processes by learning emergent second-order features

Description

Emergent processes can roughly be defined as processes that self-arise from interactions without a centralized control. People have many robust misconceptions in explaining emergent process concepts such as natural selection

Emergent processes can roughly be defined as processes that self-arise from interactions without a centralized control. People have many robust misconceptions in explaining emergent process concepts such as natural selection and diffusion. This is because they lack a proper categorical representation of emergent processes and often misclassify these processes into the sequential processes category that they are more familiar with. The two kinds of processes can be distinguished by their second-order features that describe how one interaction relates to another interaction. This study investigated if teaching emergent second-order features can help people more correctly categorize new processes, it also compared different instructional methods in teaching emergent second-order features. The prediction was that learning emergent features should help more than learning sequential features because what most people lack is the representation of emergent processes. Results confirmed this by showing participants who generated emergent features and got correct features as feedback were better at distinguishing two kinds of processes compared to participants who rewrote second-order sequential features. Another finding was that participants who generated emergent features followed by reading correct features as feedback did better in distinguishing the processes than participants who only attempted to generate the emergent features without feedback. Finally, switching the order of instruction by teaching emergent features and then asking participants to explain the difference between emergent and sequential features resulted in equivalent learning gain as the experimental group that received feedback. These results proved teaching emergent second-order features helps people categorize processes and demonstrated the most efficient way to teach them.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Providing Intelligent and Adaptive Support in Concept Map-based Learning Environments

Description

Concept maps are commonly used knowledge visualization tools and have been shown to have a positive impact on learning. The main drawbacks of concept mapping are the requirement of training,

Concept maps are commonly used knowledge visualization tools and have been shown to have a positive impact on learning. The main drawbacks of concept mapping are the requirement of training, and lack of feedback support. Thus, prior research has attempted to provide support and feedback in concept mapping, such as by developing computer-based concept mapping tools, offering starting templates and navigational supports, as well as providing automated feedback. Although these approaches have achieved promising results, there are still challenges that remain to be solved. For example, there is a need to create a concept mapping system that reduces the extraneous effort of editing a concept map while encouraging more cognitively beneficial behaviors. Also, there is little understanding of the cognitive process during concept mapping. What’s more, current feedback mechanisms in concept mapping only focus on the outcome of the map, instead of the learning process.

This thesis work strives to solve the fundamental research question: How to leverage computer technologies to intelligently support concept mapping to promote meaningful learning? To approach this research question, I first present an intelligent concept mapping system, MindDot, that supports concept mapping via innovative integration of two features, hyperlink navigation, and expert template. The system reduces the effort of creating and modifying concept maps while encouraging beneficial activities such as comparing related concepts and establishing relationships among them. I then present the comparative strategy metric that modes student learning by evaluating behavioral patterns and learning strategies. Lastly, I develop an adaptive feedback system that provides immediate diagnostic feedback in response to both the key learning behaviors during concept mapping and the correctness and completeness of the created maps.

Empirical evaluations indicated that the integrated navigational and template support in MindDot fostered effective learning behaviors and facilitating learning achievements. The comparative strategy model was shown to be highly representative of learning characteristics such as motivation, engagement, misconceptions, and predicted learning results. The feedback tutor also demonstrated positive impacts on supporting learning and assisting the development of effective learning strategies that prepare learners for future learning. This dissertation contributes to the field of supporting concept mapping with designs of technological affordances, a process-based student model, an adaptive feedback tutor, empirical evaluations of these proposed innovations, and implications for future support in concept mapping.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Investigating Galaxy Evolution and Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

Description

Galaxy formation is a complex process with aspects that are still very uncertain or unknown. A mechanism that has been utilized in simulations to successfully resolve several of these outstanding

Galaxy formation is a complex process with aspects that are still very uncertain or unknown. A mechanism that has been utilized in simulations to successfully resolve several of these outstanding issues is active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. Recent work has shown that a promising method for directly measuring this energy is by looking at small increases in the energy of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons as they pass through ionized gas, known as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (tSZ) effect.

In this work, I present stacked CMB measurements of a large number of elliptical galaxies never before measured using this method. I split the galaxies into two redshift groups, "low-z" for z=0.5-1.0 and “high-z” for z=1.0-1.5. I make two independent sets of CMB measurements using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), respectively, and I use data from the Planck telescope to account for contamination from dust emission. With SPT I find average thermal energies of 7.6(+3.0/−2.3) × 10^60 erg for 937 low-z galaxies, and 6.0(+7.7/−6.3) × 10^60 erg for 240 high-z galaxies. With ACT I find average thermal energies of 5.6(+5.9/−5.6) × 10^60 erg for 227 low-z galaxies, and 7.0(+4.7/−4.4) × 10^60 erg for 529 high-z galaxies.

I then attempt to further interpret the physical meaning of my observational results by incorporating two large-scale cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, one with (Horizon-AGN) and one without (Horizon-NoAGN) AGN feedback. I extract simulated tSZ measurements around a population of galaxies equivalent to those used in my observational work, with matching mass distributions, and compare the results. I find that the SPT measurements are consistent with Horizon-AGN, falling within 0.4σ at low-z and 0.5σ at high-z, while the ACT measurements are very different from Horizon-AGN, off by 6.9σ at low-z and 14.6σ at high-z. Additionally, the SPT measurements are loosely inconsistent with Horizon-NoAGN, off by 1.8σ at low-z but within 0.6σ at high-z, while the ACT measurements are loosely consistent with Horizon-NoAGN (at least much more so than with Horizon-AGN), falling within 0.8σ at low-z but off by 1.9σ at high-z.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Real-time feedback to improve posture and gait in Parkinson's disease: a feasibility study

Description

Although tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia are cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), impairments of gait and balance significantly affect quality of life, especially as the disease progresses, and do not

Although tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia are cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), impairments of gait and balance significantly affect quality of life, especially as the disease progresses, and do not respond well to anti-parkinsonism medications. Many studies have shown that people with PD can walk better when appropriate cues are presented but, to the best of our knowledge, the effects of real-time feedback of step length and uprightness of posture on gait and posture have not been specifically investigated. If it can be demonstrated that real-time feedback can improve posture and gait, the resultant knowledge could be used to design effective rehabilitation strategies to improve quality of life in this population.

In this feasibility study, we have developed a treadmill-based experimental paradigm to provide feedback of step length and upright posture in real-time. Ten subjects (mean age 65.9 ± 7.6 years) with mild to moderate PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage III or below) were evaluated in their ability to successfully utilize real-time feedback presented during quiet standing and treadmill walking tasks during a single data collection session in their medication-on state. During quiet standing tasks in which back angle feedback was provided, subjects were asked to utilize the feedback to maintain upright posture. During treadmill walking tasks, subjects walked at their self-selected speed for five minutes without feedback, with feedback of back angle, or with feedback of step length. During walking tasks with back angle feedback, subjects were asked to utilize the feedback to maintain upright posture. During walking tasks with step length feedback, subjects were asked to utilize the feedback to walk with increased step length. During quiet standing tasks, measurements of back angle were obtained; during walking tasks, measurements of back angle, step length, and step time were obtained.

Subjects stood and walked with significantly increased upright posture during the tasks with real-time back angle feedback compared to tasks without feedback. Similarly, subjects walked with significantly increased step length during tasks with real-time step length feedback compared to tasks without feedback. These results demonstrate that people with PD can utilize real-time feedback to improve upright posture and gait.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Increasing external teacher evaluators' self-efficacy during teacher evaluation conferences

Description

This mixed methods action research project focused on improving external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. More specifically, this project explored how and to

This mixed methods action research project focused on improving external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. More specifically, this project explored how and to what extent an intervention of a professional development model influenced external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences and how the intervention influenced external evaluators’ perception of effectiveness when providing feedback during pre- and post- evaluation conferences.

Self-efficacy theory, sociocultural theory, and the community of practice framework informed the intervention. Six external teacher evaluators participated in the study from July through December of 2017. The professional development model consisted of cycles of community of practice meetings, buddy shadowing experiences, post-buddy shadowing reflective conversations, and personal reflection. Data were collected in the form of pre- and post-intervention surveys, pre- and post-intervention interviews, reflective journal entries, and Wordles.

The results from this study indicated an increase in the evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing feedback during teacher evaluation conferences and an increase in perceived effectiveness. Successful experiences of providing feedback during teacher evaluation conferences, experiences of observing and listening to other evaluators, and engagement in reflective conversations influenced external evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. The external evaluators expressed value in the professional development experience. During the intervention, evaluators gained ideas and strategies to apply in their practice and engaged in high levels of reflection. Outcomes from the research project suggest two main implications for practice: professional development in the form of social learning and reflection as a process for growth.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

Applied interdisciplinary concepts for designing visual media within interactive neurorehabilitation systems

Description

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently more complex to design. In response to this need an emerging area of interactive system design, referred to as experiential media systems, applies hybrid knowledge synthesized across multiple disciplines to address challenges relevant to daily experience. Interactive neurorehabilitation (INR) aims to enhance functional movement therapy by integrating detailed motion capture with interactive feedback in a manner that facilitates engagement and sensorimotor learning for those who have suffered neurologic injury. While INR shows great promise to advance the current state of therapies, a cohesive media design methodology for INR is missing due to the present lack of substantial evidence within the field. Using an experiential media based approach to draw knowledge from external disciplines, this dissertation proposes a compositional framework for authoring visual media for INR systems across contexts and applications within upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The compositional framework is applied across systems for supervised training, unsupervised training, and assisted reflection, which reflect the collective work of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) Team at Arizona State University, of which the author is a member. Formal structures and a methodology for applying them are described in detail for the visual media environments designed by the author. Data collected from studies conducted by the AMRR team to evaluate these systems in both supervised and unsupervised training contexts is also discussed in terms of the extent to which the application of the compositional framework is supported and which aspects require further investigation. The potential broader implications of the proposed compositional framework and methodology are the dissemination of interdisciplinary information to accelerate the informed development of INR applications and to demonstrate the potential benefit of generalizing integrative approaches, merging arts and science based knowledge, for other complex problems related to embodied learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Factors affecting behavioral change through the use of computer-mediated technology

Description

This study explores the impact of feedback and feedforward and personality on computer-mediated behavior change. The impact of the effects were studied using subjects who entered information relevant to their

This study explores the impact of feedback and feedforward and personality on computer-mediated behavior change. The impact of the effects were studied using subjects who entered information relevant to their diet and exercise into an online tool. Subjects were divided into four experimental groups: those receiving only feedback, those receiving only feedforward, those receiving both, and those receiving none. Results were analyzed using regression analysis. Results indicate that both feedforward and feedback impact behavior change and that individuals with individuals ranking low in conscientiousness experienced behavior change equivalent to that of individuals with high conscientiousness in the presence of feedforward and/or feedback.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012