Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

137474-Thumbnail Image.png

A Review of Consulting Activities with the Havasupai Tribe

Description

For the past two years, New Venture Group (nVg) and the Havasupai Tribe have worked together on a variety of community development projects. The purpose of this paper is to provide descriptions and documentation for these projects and how they

For the past two years, New Venture Group (nVg) and the Havasupai Tribe have worked together on a variety of community development projects. The purpose of this paper is to provide descriptions and documentation for these projects and how they are related to the economic development of the community. The partnership with the Havasupai Tribe has allowed nVg to learn the history and culture of one of Arizona's oldest communities. It has been necessary to understand the traditional values of the Havasupai to design projects that will benefit the tribe and gain support from its members. The products that nVg has worked on under the direction of the Havasupai include: - Computer training sessions - A tribal website - Financial analyses of Supai enterprises - Data management resources These and additional activities will be explained in the following pages. They were created following several meetings with tribal members and Enterprise Managers in Tempe and Supai, Arizona over the last two years. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the economic development of Supai and the Havasupai people more generally. Economic development means combining the existing strengths of the Havasupai community with nVg's business management experience, creating a stronger and more productive economy that contributes to the overall quality of life for the Havasupai.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

134950-Thumbnail Image.png

From College Student to CEO

Description

The beginnings of this paper developed from the initial question of: how can tribal nations create private economies on their reservations? Written and researched from an undergraduate student perspective, this paper begins to answer the question by analyzing the historical

The beginnings of this paper developed from the initial question of: how can tribal nations create private economies on their reservations? Written and researched from an undergraduate student perspective, this paper begins to answer the question by analyzing the historical and current states of Indian Country's diverse tribal economies. Additionally, this paper will identify various tribal economic development challenges with a specific emphasis on education attainment as a key factor. Then, a solution will be presented in the form of a tribal business program modeled within the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University located in Tempe, Arizona. The solution is grounded in the idea that a highly qualified workforce is the best resource for economic development.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

151661-Thumbnail Image.png

Colonization and madness: involuntary psychiatric commitment law and policy frameworks as applied to American Indians

Description

This dissertation project is a legal and policy analysis of California's involuntary psychiatric commitment laws and policy as applied to American Indians (AI). Mental health-based civil commitment and conservatorships constitute some of the most severe intrusions into personal liberties and

This dissertation project is a legal and policy analysis of California's involuntary psychiatric commitment laws and policy as applied to American Indians (AI). Mental health-based civil commitment and conservatorships constitute some of the most severe intrusions into personal liberties and freedom outside of the criminal justice system. In the context of AI peoples and tribal Nations, however, these intrusions implicate not only individual freedoms and well-being but also larger notions of tribal sovereignty, self-determination, culture, and the dialectic relationship between individual identity and community knowledge related to definitions of health, illness and the social meaning of difference. Yet, in the context of involuntary psychiatric commitments, the law reflects a failure to understand this relationship, alternating between strategic use of the sovereignty doctrine to deny access to services or, alternatively, wholly absenting issues of sovereignty and Indigenous worldviews from legal discourse. This project explores the nuanced ways in which these issues are weaved into the fabric of mental health law and policy and how they function to codify, enact and maintain colonization for AI peoples and Nations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013