Matching Items (5)

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A 15-Minute Walk: The Short Term Effect of Low Intensity Physical Activity on the Hunger Levels of Pre-diabetic, Obese Adults

Description

Physical activity as a health or nutrition related intervention might stimulate appetite and increase hunger due to increased energy expenditure. This study analyzed the effect of a postprandial 15-minute walk

Physical activity as a health or nutrition related intervention might stimulate appetite and increase hunger due to increased energy expenditure. This study analyzed the effect of a postprandial 15-minute walk on the hunger and energy intake of 10 obese, pre-diabetic adults. Subjects participated in three 4-hour trials: a walk treatment (consume highly glycemic meal, walk for 15 minutes at a moderate pace, and rest for 4 hours), a fiber treatment (consume highly glycemic meal enriched with soluble fiber and rest for 4 hours), and a control treatment (consume highly glycemic meal without fiber and rest for 4 hours). The effects of each treatment on hunger and energy intake were measured using a Likert scale analysis (ranging from "completely satisfied" to "extremely hungry") at 4 hours post-treatment and pre/ post 24-hour dietary logs. The results showed no significant increase or decrease on hunger or energy intake for both the walk and the fiber treatment compared to the control treatment. This denies the idea that physical activity might increase short-term hunger, and supports the use of physical activity as a viable nutrition related intervention tool.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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ASU4Food

Description

ASU4Food's objective is to increase the visibility of the statewide hunger crisis among Arizona State University's campuses, and to raise monetary and food donations to alleviate this issue. By collaborating

ASU4Food's objective is to increase the visibility of the statewide hunger crisis among Arizona State University's campuses, and to raise monetary and food donations to alleviate this issue. By collaborating with a multitude of organizations both on and off-campus, we aim to become a well-known, powerful, and stable student organization. This thesis will cover the endeavors of Elana Niren, Theresa Reckamp, and Sidath Wijetunga regarding the maintenance, growth, and expansion of ASU4Food. ASu4Food has been striving to gain connections and the reputation that would allow it to become an "umbrella organization" with the ability to coordinate all of the food-raising endeavors at ASU. The effects of our actions can be seen in the club's stability. We are now being sought out by organizations such as the Salvation Army, Sunflower Farmers Market, and Shutterfly. However, there is still more work to be done, and we hope that this thesis will act as a guide for future generation of club members and officers, and that ASU4Food will continue improving in activity and efficiency for many years to come.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The M&G Drive

Description

The M&G Drive is a proposed venture project lead by Barrett seniors, Elijah Smith and Jenna Fitzgerald. This project aims to educate Arizona State University (ASU) students on the issues

The M&G Drive is a proposed venture project lead by Barrett seniors, Elijah Smith and Jenna Fitzgerald. This project aims to educate Arizona State University (ASU) students on the issues of food insecurity around the Phoenix valley and facilitate their involvement in helping alleviate this pressing social matter. Scientific research has shown significant inverse relationships between food insecurity and the following: mental and physical health, social skills, and academic achievement. As the largest public university in the nation, Arizona State holds a self-ascribed responsibility for the health of its communities. In order to address this issue on behalf of Arizona State and from the standpoint of college students, this proposed venture will encourage the ASU student population to reallocate their unused M&G Dollars (ASU’s on-campus currency) to go toward this cause. Rather than being absorbed back by the university system, unused M&G Dollars can instead be used to purchase non-perishables that will then be donated to the local Phoenix community in order to help fight against food insecurity.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The relationship between food insecurity and weight status, eating behaviors, the home food environment, meal planning and preparation, and perceived stress in parents living in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

Description

Objectives Through a cross-sectional observational study, this thesis evaluates the relationship between food insecurity and weight status, eating behaviors, the home food environment, meal planning and preparation, and perceived stress

Objectives Through a cross-sectional observational study, this thesis evaluates the relationship between food insecurity and weight status, eating behaviors, the home food environment, meal planning and preparation, and perceived stress as it relates to predominantly Hispanic/Latino parents in Phoenix, Arizona. The purpose of this study was to address gaps in the literature by examining differences in "healthy" and "unhealthy" eating behaviors, foods available in the home, how time and low energy impact meal preparation, and the level of stress between food security groups. Methods Parents, 18 years or older, were recruited during two pre-scheduled health fairs, from English as a second language classes, or from the Women, Infants, and Children's clinic at a local community center, Golden Gate Community Center, in Phoenix, Arizona. An interview, electronic, or paper survey were offered in either Spanish or English to collect data on the variables described above. In addition to the survey, height and weight were collected for all participants to determine BMI and weight status. One hundred and sixty participants were recruited. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models, adjusting for weight status, education, race/ethnicity, income level, and years residing in the U.S., were used to assess the relationship between food security status and weight status, eating behaviors, the home food environment, meal planning and preparation, and perceived stress. Results Results concluded that food insecurity was more prevalent among parents reporting lower income levels compared to higher income levels (p=0.017). In adjusted models, higher perceived cost of fruits (p=0.004) and higher perceived level of stress (p=0.001) were associated with food insecurity. Given that the sample population was predominately women, a post-hoc analysis was completed on women only. In addition to the two significant results noted in the adjusted analyses, the women-only analysis revealed that food insecure mothers reported lower amounts of vegetables served with meals (p=0.019) and higher use of fast-food when tired or running late (p=0.043), compared to food secure mothers. Conclusion Additional studies are needed to further assess differences in stress levels between food insecure parents and food insecure parents, with special consideration for directionality and its relationship to weight status.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Don't go to the grocery store hungry?: the effect of hunger on food attractiveness and consumption

Description

Although it is commonly assumed that consumers eat more and find food to be more attractive when hungry, surprisingly little research has looked at how robust this effect might be

Although it is commonly assumed that consumers eat more and find food to be more attractive when hungry, surprisingly little research has looked at how robust this effect might be and what could moderate it. Building on theories of hunger and self-control, this research examines which types of foods (hedonic or utilitarian) are more attractive and likely to be consumed by hungry consumers. Across a series of six experiments I find that when hungry and under reduced cognitive capacity, consumers find hedonic foods more attractive and consume them in larger quantities. However, when hungry and with high cognitive capacity, consumers have the ability to engage in counteractive self-control, thus limiting both the attractiveness and consumption of hedonic food items. Furthermore, I find that hunger is not likely to influence the attractiveness of utilitarian foods, but is likely to increase the consumption of these foods, regardless of cognitive capacity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012