Matching Items (19)

Encouraging Civic Engagement for Kids: Activity Booklet for Ages 8-12

Description

Civic education in America should be focused on empowering future generations to take full advantage of their rights as citizens and realize their potential to incite change. Even at a young age, it is important that we educate children on

Civic education in America should be focused on empowering future generations to take full advantage of their rights as citizens and realize their potential to incite change. Even at a young age, it is important that we educate children on what it means to be a United States citizen so that they can begin cultivating their personal political experience. As soon as the child is at the age where they can begin to understand basic political and governmental concepts, they should be encouraged to start thinking about their roles as citizens in a Democratic government. More often than not, young adults express that they wish they had been exposed to the political climate earlier on in life. When a lot of these adolescents reach voting age, they are woefully under-educated and apathetic towards their participation in the civic sphere. This activity booklet was designed to not only educate but also empower and inspire kids, and to really get them excited for their futures in the civic sphere.

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2018-05

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On Empathy Development in Young Children

Description

During the formative years, habits, outlooks, and attitudes develop which influence social interaction throughout life. Because empathy is crucial in social interaction, empathy development should be supported. Evidence of empathy is first observed around the age of two (Radke-Yarrow et

During the formative years, habits, outlooks, and attitudes develop which influence social interaction throughout life. Because empathy is crucial in social interaction, empathy development should be supported. Evidence of empathy is first observed around the age of two (Radke-Yarrow et al., 1983, 1984; Spinrad & Fabes, 2009). The purpose of this thesis is to examine empathy in children from multiple perspectives. The scientific literature reviews the discovery of the mirror neuron system (MNS). A study on nine- and ten-year-old children showed a correlation between MNS activity and empathic concern (Pfeifer et al. 2008). Another study with a mean age of 11 demonstrated that high emotional intelligence (EI) resulted in more nominations for "cooperation" and less for "aggression" (Petrides, Sangareau, Furnham & Frederickson, 2006). The three most common EI tests (MSCEIT, TEIQue, Bar-On) are modeled to measure empathy (Bar-On, 2006; Goleman 1998, 1995; Mayer & Caruso 1997; Petrides & Furnham 2001). Psychologists agree that low measures are linked to narcissistic and aggressive behavior. The Observational Study analyzed both evidence of empathy and a lack of empathy in interactions with three- and four-year-old children. Personal experiences were also shared on how empathy was understood and practiced. Lastly, the children's short story was written to support empathy development through fiction-reading.

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2018-12

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Promoting Diversity in Children's Literature Through Creative Writing

Description

In an effort to combat the lack of diversity in Children's Literature, this project displays a piece of literature titled Stories & Stages: A Tale of Two Sisters, in the form of a children's chapter book for a middle grade

In an effort to combat the lack of diversity in Children's Literature, this project displays a piece of literature titled Stories & Stages: A Tale of Two Sisters, in the form of a children's chapter book for a middle grade audience. Focusing on characters of a Hispanic background without relying on stereotypes or false characterizations, the novel works to inspire young minds and reflect a true representation of the world children are living in. This is done using research on different aspects of Children's Literature, including: the definition of children's literature, diversity, girlhood, and sibling relationships. This research provides the basis for the project, as does personal experience and background. Following the novel is a recording of the background research involved and a documentations of the creative process. Keywords: Children's Literature, Diversity

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2017-12

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Sofia & Isabella Share a Difficult Time: A Children's Book About Loss

Description

This thesis aims to explain how a child can deal with loss through a children's book that I have written and illustrated. The goal is to have a child, as young as the age of seven, be able to pick

This thesis aims to explain how a child can deal with loss through a children's book that I have written and illustrated. The goal is to have a child, as young as the age of seven, be able to pick up the book and come away with an initial understanding of how grief affects people. There are references to other works of literature similarly dealing with the above topic. The different stages of grief are examined, as well as the ways in which grief can be handled. Facial expressions and body language are crucial to understanding others' pain and grief, so this thesis delves into how to translate different expressions and actions, and how artwork and illustrations can portray these same ideas. The story from the book is interwoven throughout the thesis, so as to show my reasoning for each section of the text. Finally, there is a full analysis of the text as well as the illustrations that explains why the text is fitting for each section of the story.

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2015-05

The Butanding: A Narrative Illustration Book and Exhibition

Description

My work focuses on the themes of grief, closure, and celebration of life. Life is a catalyst both celebration and grief. Feeling joy when a life is introduced is as common as feeling pain when a life is lost. When

My work focuses on the themes of grief, closure, and celebration of life. Life is a catalyst both celebration and grief. Feeling joy when a life is introduced is as common as feeling pain when a life is lost. When I lost my maternal grandmother nearly a year ago, I felt grief accompanied with guilt. I never got a chance to say goodbye since we lived so far apart, her residing in the Philippines and me residing in the United States. In order to get rid of these negative emotions, I sought closure. I attended her funeral, and now I want to celebrate her life through my artwork.
My work comes in two parts: an illustration book titled The Butanding and an illustration exhibition. The book will be published through lulu.com and made available to the public. The exhibition component will be held from March 2nd to March 6th in Gallery 100 as part of my senior exhibition Post Pre-Production with six other colleagues in the School of Art. The illustration book is a narration of a little girl and her growing friendship with a whale shark. The overarching theme of the creative project is closure with the passing away of loved ones.
The Butanding is a narrative illustration book about a young girl befriending the local menace of her village, the whale shark. Similar to my own experience, the main subject—the young girl—of my narrative is shown suffering from grief and guilt over her grandmother’s death. My work illustrates a progression of the young girl’s emotional state as she goes on a journey with the whale shark or locally known in the Philippines as the “butanding”. It provides the scenario of a grieving individual who gets the chance to reconnect with a deceased loved one and rebuild relationships that were lost.

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2015-05

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Homonormativity in Children's Literature

Description

The front cover of Uncle What-Is-It is Coming to Visit, a 1993 children’s book by Michael-Willhoite, features two white children frightened by the hairy arm and upturned wrist of an unseen adult. The arm is clad in a frilly pink

The front cover of Uncle What-Is-It is Coming to Visit, a 1993 children’s book by Michael-Willhoite, features two white children frightened by the hairy arm and upturned wrist of an unseen adult. The arm is clad in a frilly pink and orange sleeve, and gaudy bracelets hang from the wrist. The plot hinges on the children’s uncertainty about an uncle they have yet to meet; they know he is gay but are unsure of what it means. Before their mother can explain, she is distracted by a kitchen mishap and the siblings turn to other neighborhood children for answers. They encounter a host of descriptions that terrify them: one neighbor describes gay people as “fags [and] queers [who] really want to be women.” He shows the children a newspaper clipping photo of “a large man dressed in a frilly dress [with] a turban piled high with fruit on his head,” an implicitly racialized caricature reminiscent of Latina style icon Carmen Miranda. Another neighbor describes gay people as “dressed up in black leather. Zippers and chains all over...Dark glasses [and] chaps” (Willhoite, 1993). After having nightmares of men with sinister expressions in tropical-themed drag and leather, the children are overjoyed to discover that their uncle seems “normal.” Relative to depictions of other gay people in the book, Uncle Brett is normal because he is nonthreatening—he is white with short, straight, brown hair; he wears a plain, blue, collared shirt and brown dress pants; he carries a brown briefcase; and he enjoys and excels at activities appropriate for his gender, like catch. Although the book seems to have an affirming message about accepting queer people, it sends a clear message about which queer people are to be feared by children and which are nonthreatening. Nonthreatening queers are those who seem most like people mainstream western society considers normal: people who conform to expected gender roles, who have a vested interest parenting, and who are white and middle-upper class. These nonthreatening queers are by far the most represented in queer-themed literature for children. Based on a survey of 68 children’s books with queer characters, this paper argues that the representation of queer identities in children’s literature upholds more than challenges heteronormativity. I will first address ways many of the books perpetuate gender normativity by problematizing young male characters’ gender-transgressing behavior, portraying queer adults with less threatening gender presentations, and upholding gender binarism; next, I will address how the majority of the books promote repro-narrativity by focusing on monogamous couples’ strong desires and concerted efforts to have/raise children; I will then address race and class and the way white and upper-middle class queer characters are overrepresented while non-white and lower-class queer characters are underrepresented or not represented at all.

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2012-12

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On Writing A Picture Book

Description

This paper details my journey into children's publishing (as a Supply Chain major fairly unfamiliar with the industry) and culminates with my attempt at writing a picture book.

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2013-05

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Korean parents' perspectives on Korean American children's literature

Description

There are few studies on parents' perspectives on multicultural literature. Most studies on Korean American children's literature have relied on the researchers' content analysis of the books, rather than readers' responses to them. To fill this gap, this study sought

There are few studies on parents' perspectives on multicultural literature. Most studies on Korean American children's literature have relied on the researchers' content analysis of the books, rather than readers' responses to them. To fill this gap, this study sought to understand the Korean/Korean American parents' perspectives on Korean American children's literature by examining their responses to seven picture books on Korean American children. Data were collected for this qualitative study by interviewing ten Koreans/Korean Americans, twice. The first interview focused on stories about their immigration to the U.S., involvement with their children's reading, and experiences reading books related to Korea or Koreans published in the U.S. The second interview focused on their responses to seven Korean American children's literature books. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed. The parents' responses, which were infused with their personal, social, and cultural marks, focused on five themes: (a) use of Korean names without specific cultural description, (b) misrepresentation of Korean/Korean American experiences, (c) undesirable illustrations, (d) criteria for good Korean American children's literature, and (e) use of Korean words in English books. The parents' stories about their involvement with their children's reading suggest that to promote multicultural literature, libraries or schools should offer lists of multicultural literature. The parents' responses showed concern about stereotypical images of Korea or Korean American in the U.S. media that often get transferred to stories about Korean Americans in Korean American children's literature. This study confirms the importance of editors and reviewers, who are knowledgeable about the Korean culture and Korean American experience. It also suggests that more books with varied images of Korean Americans, and more stories about Korean Americans children's authentic experiences are necessary in order to represent the complexity and divergence within Korean people and the Korean American culture.

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Date Created
2013

The Role of Children's Literature in Correcting Ocean Plastic Pollution

Description

In the last 100 years, humans have grown increasingly dependent on synthetic plastic products. Companies have taken advantage of the low cost and convenience that plastics provide. However, the rise in plastic consumption has had unforeseen consequences. Due to plastic’s

In the last 100 years, humans have grown increasingly dependent on synthetic plastic products. Companies have taken advantage of the low cost and convenience that plastics provide. However, the rise in plastic consumption has had unforeseen consequences. Due to plastic’s resistance to biodegradation the hazardous material has accumulated in the environment. While few plastics are recycled and placed in landfills, the majority of this waste will accumulate in the oceans where it threatens the health of marine wildlife. Ocean organisms often become entangled or consume plastic waste; in the majority of these cases death is inevitable. The consumption of plastics causes contamination throughout all marine trophic levels. Plastic toxins bio-accumulate in tissues. The toxins concentrate as they move up the trophic levels and harm life processes of marine organisms. A vital step in combating plastic pollution is educating the public. Children, in particular, need to understand the negative implications of plastic pollution because they will experience the consequences. The goal of this project is to spread awareness of plastic pollution to young children in an entertaining and emotional way. There are several approaches to publishing a successful children’s book; the story should be captivating, reliable, with a compelling story that the reader may relate too. For this project, three well-structured children’s books were examined for inspiration. A children’s book was then constructed to inform children of ocean plastic pollution.

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Date Created
2019-05

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What's an Engineer Anyways?

Description

This creative project is a children’s book designed to teach young readers about engineering through a fictional story about a group of children creating a robot for their school’s show-and-tell. The story aims to teach engineering principles to children in

This creative project is a children’s book designed to teach young readers about engineering through a fictional story about a group of children creating a robot for their school’s show-and-tell. The story aims to teach engineering principles to children in a lighthearted and entertaining form, narrating notions such as the design process, prototyping, specialty fields, and repurposing. Other principles such as learning patience, compromise and teamwork are also conveyed throughout the plot details. Small life lessons that transcend the realm of engineering are also embodied throughout. The plot of the story is a young girl who goes to visit her grandfather who is a garage tinkerer with a love of spare parts. He tells her about his job as a robotics engineer, and she loves it. She goes and tells her friends who decide they want to make a robot for show-and-tell at school. The grandfather agrees to help them build a robot and thus the group of kids are walked through the engineering design process, learning new things (and specialization) along the way. The story ends by revealing that the whole story was a flashback the main character was having as she is about to start her first day at an engineering firm.

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2019-05