Matching Items (6)

Physical Interference

Description

this project is about interrupting existing patterns of urban loneliness. the project explores three urban typologies of loneliness and potential interferences for each landscape. obstacles to unloneliness are investigated, such

this project is about interrupting existing patterns of urban loneliness. the project explores three urban typologies of loneliness and potential interferences for each landscape. obstacles to unloneliness are investigated, such as urban form and social media. each is evaluated for its effect on loneliness and how this effect can be used to influence urbanites to feel less lonely. the focus is on ideas and experimentation. physical interference seeks to challenge preconceptions of what a city is, how one experiences the urban environment, and the role social media plays in our daily lives. the goal is to determine a spatial representation of the effect urbanism and social media have on loneliness and to use that to suggest a new typology of public space to promote unloneliness within phoenix, san francisco, and new york city. physical interference is a manifestation of ideas surrounding the modern urban experience.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Bullying, loneliness, and future responses to stress

Description

Bully victimization has been associated with blunted cardiovascular responses to stress as well as elevated responses to stress. The difference between these altered physiological responses to stress is largely unknown.

Bully victimization has been associated with blunted cardiovascular responses to stress as well as elevated responses to stress. The difference between these altered physiological responses to stress is largely unknown. This study explored several possible moderators to the relationship between chronic stress and future cardiac output (an indicator of increased stress) in response to future stressors. These moderators include the difference between social and physical stressors and individual levels of loneliness. Participants were administered measures of loneliness and victimization history, and led to anticipate either a "social" (recorded speech) or "non-social" (pain tolerance test ) stressor, neither of which occurred. EKG and impedance cardiography were measured throughout the session. When anticipating both stressors, loneliness and victimization were associated with increased CO. A regression revealed a three-way interaction, with change in cardiac output depending on victimization history, loneliness, and condition in the physical stressor condition. Loneliness magnified the CO output levels of non-bullied individuals when facing a physical stressor. These results suggest that non- bullied participants high in loneliness are more stressed out when facing stressors, particularly stressors that are physically threatening in nature.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Does loneliness moderate the relations between interpersonal events and affect, stress, enjoyment, and bodily pain?

Description

Research has suggested that lonely people demonstrate distinct differences from nonlonely people in their behaviors, mood, and interpersonal experiences. Lonely people who are also enduring a chronic pain condition may

Research has suggested that lonely people demonstrate distinct differences from nonlonely people in their behaviors, mood, and interpersonal experiences. Lonely people who are also enduring a chronic pain condition may be at an especially high risk for negative outcomes because of simultaneous issues such as stigma, mood disturbances, and pain-related disability. The current study examined chronic and transitory loneliness in a sample of 123 chronic pain patients. Participants completed daily diaries assessing the occurrence of positive and negative interpersonal events, appraisals of interpersonal events, pain, and mood. Multilevel modeling was used to examine effects of being a lonely person as well as having a lonely episode on daily life. Results indicated that both chronic and transitory loneliness were associated with more frequent negative and less frequent positive interpersonal events, higher levels of pain, more negative and less positive affect, and more stress and less enjoyment from social interactions. Loneliness did not affect reactivity to negative interpersonal events, but did influence responsivity to positive interpersonal events such that lonely people had greater boosts in enjoyment when experiencing more positive interpersonal events than usual. These findings suggest that both lonely people and individuals experiencing a lonely episode experience more negative consequences in their daily lives than nonlonely people. However, they can benefit from engaging in more frequent positive interpersonal events, which can help to inform future clinical interventions for lonely, chronic pain patients.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Loneliness Experiences of Hmong Older Adults: A Constructivist Grounded Theory Study

Description

Approximately 89 million Americans will be age 65 and older by 2050 in the United States. This older adult population is especially vulnerable to loneliness as a result of numerous

Approximately 89 million Americans will be age 65 and older by 2050 in the United States. This older adult population is especially vulnerable to loneliness as a result of numerous age-related risk factors including loss of social support and declining health. In addition to these common risk factors, refugee older adults may face increased loneliness as a consequence of war-related trauma, loss, and marginalized cultural values in their host country. Despite their heightened vulnerabilities to loneliness, the experiences of refugee older adults remain understudied.

This is the first study aimed at understanding the loneliness experiences of community-dwelling Hmong older adults, an ethnic group resettled in the United States as refugees over 40 years ago. A constructivist grounded theory method guided by an intersectionality framework was used to address three aims: 1) to understand the concept of loneliness among community-dwelling Hmong older adults, 2) to explore the premigration, displacement, and postmigration experiences of loneliness among community-dwelling Hmong older adults, and 3) to examine how community-dwelling Hmong older adults cope with loneliness. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 17 Hmong older adults age 65 and older residing in Sacramento and Fresno, California. Analysis of the data was an iterative process between coding the data, generating focused codes, and connecting the categories to establish a conceptual pattern.

Participants conceptualized loneliness as a negative experience represented through physical and emotional expressions and intensity, which were influenced by an intersectional identity. Factors that influenced their experiences of loneliness in the premigration, displacement, and postmigration phase were discussed as trust, loss, aging-related issues, isolation, sense of community, access to cultural community, instability, violence, and cultural adjustments. Their narratives offered several coping mechanisms including religious and spiritual beliefs, social support, wandering, activity engagement, and control and avoidance. These findings informed a conceptual model of loneliness that incorporated an intersectional identity, influencing factors, and coping mechanisms. Overall, the results provide nuanced cultural meanings and insight into the loneliness experiences of Hmong older adults. Implications for social work research, practice, and policy suggests the need for greater culturally- and linguistically-competent services informed by Hmong older adults.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Alone in the Crowd: Loneliness, its Correlates and Association to Health Status among Omani Older Adults

Description

Advances in health care have resulted in an increase in life expectancy causing a rapid growth in the number of older adults at a global level. At the same time,

Advances in health care have resulted in an increase in life expectancy causing a rapid growth in the number of older adults at a global level. At the same time, socioeconomic development is transitioning family structures and social relationships. With reduced family engagement, many older adults are more at risk for physical and psychological health issues including loneliness, which is considered a public health issue affecting their quality of life and well-being. This descriptive, exploratory study aims to describe the significance of loneliness in three northern regions of the Sultanate of Oman. The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of loneliness and the relationship of loneliness to health statuses among older Omani adults aged 60 years and above. A demographic data questionnaire, the UCLA loneliness scale, and SF-12-v-1 health status instruments were used for data collection. The sample includes 113 Omani older adults, male (n = 36) and female (n = 77), who experienced a mixture from low to high and severe levels of loneliness. Among these older adults, 34.5% perceived low level, 34.5% moderate level, 22.1% high, and 8.8% were severely lonely. The main demographic factors that were associated with the older adults level of loneliness were female gender, older age 80 years and above, living with others who were not a family member, and being unemployed. When controlling for demographic and environmental factors loneliness was a significant predictor (p < .001) for lower mental health status but not for physical health status (p > .05).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Combating Loneliness Through Outreach and Wellness Programming During a Global Pandemic

Description

How does a university serve the needs of students in the face of a global pandemic? In truly unprecedented times, administrators were pushed to perform in new modalities and under

How does a university serve the needs of students in the face of a global pandemic? In truly unprecedented times, administrators were pushed to perform in new modalities and under very different circumstances. For many months, change was the only constant and student support needs were a whole new world to navigate. The purpose of this phenomenological action research study was to conduct outreach and implement wellness programming as an intervention to reduce loneliness in college students experiencing isolation or quarantine due to COVID-19. Four theoretical frameworks guided the study, including the work of Astin (1975, 1984, 1993, 2001), Kuh (2001), Hawkley and Cacioppo (2010), and Fullan (2001). In this qualitative study, data pertaining to student well-being, loneliness and motivation to persist were collected through the use of pre- and post-intervention semi-structured interviews as well as participant journal entries. Study participants were undergraduate students who had tested positive for COVID-19 or had been exposed to COVID-19 and were therefore in isolation or quarantine, respectively. The intervention extended the length of the semester and involved implementation of outreach and wellness programming initiatives for each participant.
Through the findings provided, one can see the impact of isolation or quarantine on college students as well as the influence of the intervention on student well-being, connection, and persistence to graduation. The discussion of this work will describe the implications of this study as well as the lessons learned.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021