Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

157900-Thumbnail Image.png

A Low Cost, High Dynamic Range, Versatile Digital Readout Integrated Circuit Unit Cell Prototype for Infrared Imaging Applications

Description

Readout Integrated Circuits(ROICs) are important components of infrared(IR) imag

ing systems. Performance of ROICs affect the quality of images obtained from IR

imaging systems. Contemporary infrared imaging applications demand ROICs that

can support large dynamic range, high frame rate, high output data rate,

Readout Integrated Circuits(ROICs) are important components of infrared(IR) imag

ing systems. Performance of ROICs affect the quality of images obtained from IR

imaging systems. Contemporary infrared imaging applications demand ROICs that

can support large dynamic range, high frame rate, high output data rate, at low

cost, size and power. Some of these applications are military surveillance, remote

sensing in space and earth science missions and medical diagnosis. This work focuses

on developing a ROIC unit cell prototype for National Aeronautics and Space Ad

ministration(NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s(JPL’s) space applications. These

space applications also demand high sensitivity, longer integration times(large well

capacity), wide operating temperature range, wide input current range and immunity

to radiation events such as Single Event Latchup(SEL).

This work proposes a digital ROIC(DROIC) unit cell prototype of 30ux30u size,

to be used mainly with NASA JPL’s High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared

Detectors(HOT BIRDs). Current state of the art DROICs achieve a dynamic range

of 16 bits using advanced 65-90nm CMOS processes which adds a lot of cost overhead.

The DROIC pixel proposed in this work uses a low cost 180nm CMOS process and

supports a dynamic range of 20 bits operating at a low frame rate of 100 frames per

second(fps), and a dynamic range of 12 bits operating at a high frame rate of 5kfps.

The total electron well capacity of this DROIC pixel is 1.27 billion electrons, enabling

integration times as long as 10ms, to achieve better dynamic range. The DROIC unit

cell uses an in-pixel 12-bit coarse ADC and an external 8-bit DAC based fine ADC.

The proposed DROIC uses layout techniques that make it immune to radiation up to

300krad(Si) of total ionizing dose(TID) and single event latch-up(SEL). It also has a

wide input current range from 10pA to 1uA and supports detectors operating from

Short-wave infrared (SWIR) to longwave infrared (LWIR) regions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

161721-Thumbnail Image.png

Imaging and Targeting with Optics and Acoustics

Description

This thesis describes the development, characterization, and application of new biomedical technologies developed around the photoacoustic effect. The photoacoustic effect is defined as optical absorption-based generation of ultrasound and provides the foundation for a unique method of imaging and molecular

This thesis describes the development, characterization, and application of new biomedical technologies developed around the photoacoustic effect. The photoacoustic effect is defined as optical absorption-based generation of ultrasound and provides the foundation for a unique method of imaging and molecular detection. The range of applications of the photoacoustic effect have not yet been fully explored. Photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) has emerged as a minimally invasive tool for imaging internal organs and tissues. One of the main themes of this dissertation involves the first reported dual-intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound deep-tissue imaging endoscope. This device was designed to enable physicians at the point-of-care to better elucidate overall gynecological health, by imaging the lining of the human uterus. Intrauterine photoacoustic endoscopy is made possible due to the small diameter of the endoscope (3mm), which allows for complete, 360-degree organ analysis from within the uterine cavity. In certain biomedical applications, however, further minimization is necessary. Sufficiently small diameter endoscopes may allow for the possibility of applying PAE in new areas. To further miniaturize the diameter of our endoscopes, alternative imaging probe designs were investigated. The proposed PAE architecture utilizes a hollow optical waveguide to allow for concentric guiding of both light and sound. This enables imaging depths of up to several millimeters into animal tissue while maintaining an outer diameter of roughly 1mm. In the final focus of this dissertation, these waveguides are further investigated for use in micropipette electrodes, common in the field of single cell electrophysiology. Pulsed light is coupled with these electrodes providing real-time photoacoustic feedback, useful in navigation towards intended targets. Lastly, fluorescence can be generated and collected at the micropipette aperture by utilizing an intra-electrode tapered optical fiber. This allows for a targeted robotic approach to labeled neurons that is independent of microscopy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021