Matching Items (25)

Nutrition Education Video Series for the Improvement of Arizona State University Student Health

Description

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which information is true and which advice they will follow. During this time of growth and learning, it is essential that students have access to accurate information that will help them to be healthier individuals for years to come. The goal of this project was to provide students with an easily accessible and reliable resource for nutrition information that was presented in a simple and relatable way. The following videos and attached materials were created in response to ASU student needs and will be available for students on the ASU wellness website. Eating Healthy on a Budget: https://youtu.be/H-IUArD0phY Healthy Choices at Fast Food Restaurants: https://youtu.be/ZxcjBblpRtM Quick Healthy Meals: https://youtu.be/7uIDFe15-dM

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

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The Effect of an Upstander Intervention on Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Bullying and Promoting Upstander Behavior

Description

Research shows that an effective method for decreasing bullying is for bystanders to intervene when they see bullying occur. If students are going to intervene they need to be able

Research shows that an effective method for decreasing bullying is for bystanders to intervene when they see bullying occur. If students are going to intervene they need to be able to not only recognize bullying, but also have strategies to combat it. Students should be able to get this information from their teachers. However, preservice teachers who will one day have their own classroom do not have knowledge of bullying and upstander behavior. We created an online training for preservice teachers to increase their knowledge of bullying and upstander behavior so they could share these practices with their future students and in turn their students could become upstanders and decrease bullying incidents. Implications for future research and policy include repeating the study over a longer period of time, and the inclusion of upstander behavior training into existing preservice teacher training programs.

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Effects of Lifestyle Intervention on Cardiorespiratory Fitness Among Latino Youth with Obesity and Prediabetes

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Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention on cardiorespiratory fitness in Latino youth with obesity and prediabetes. <br/>Methods: Participants (n=50) in this

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention on cardiorespiratory fitness in Latino youth with obesity and prediabetes. <br/>Methods: Participants (n=50) in this study were taken from a larger randomized controlled trial (n=180, BMI ≥ 95th percentile). Youth participated in a 6-month lifestyle intervention that included physical activity (60 minutes, 3x/week) and nutrition and wellness classes (60 minutes, 1x/week) delivered to families at the Lincoln Family YMCA in Downtown Phoenix. The primary outcome was cardiorespiratory fitness measured at baseline and post-intervention.<br/>Results: The mean BMI for the sample was 33.17 ± 4.54 kg/m2, which put the participants in the 98.4th percentile. At baseline, the mean VO2max was 2737.02 ± 488.89 mL/min. The mean relative VO2max was 30.65 ± 3.87 mL/kg/min. VO2max values significantly increased from baseline to post-intervention (2737.022 ± 483.977 mL/min vs 2932.654 ± 96.062 mL/min, p<0.001). <br/>Conclusion: Culturally-grounded, family-focused lifestyle interventions are a promising approach for improving cardiorespiratory fitness in high-risk youth at risk for diabetes.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Atrocity, Trauma, and the Implementation of Psychological Aid

Description

This thesis examines the current state of intervention in developing countries that are suffering from human rights abuses, mass killings, and/or politicide. The first part of this thesis will be

This thesis examines the current state of intervention in developing countries that are suffering from human rights abuses, mass killings, and/or politicide. The first part of this thesis will be a brief examination of present-day United States intervention efforts in order to understand the decision making and reconstruction process within the status quo. This will also be done by looking at the global community´s preferred form of intervention and how the United States aligns with these standards such as those represented in the Responsibility to Protect. Secondly, this thesis aims to remodel the reconstruction process in order to conceptualize the addition of mental health first aid. This will be presented by first analyzing the importance of mental health aid and then looking at the specific diagnoses that concatenate with trauma. This thesis argues that current reconstruction efforts are insufficient without the implementation of psychological aid. Without adding psychological aid, countries are more likely to return to cycles of violence that were present pre-intervention. Public policy should change to include aiding civilians, not only physically, economically, or militarily, but also by including psychological aid. Implementing behavior health specific aid in developing countries may potentially be the missing component to lasting change that countries need in order to sustain political sovereignty and support community efforts to rebuild. This research, therefore, aims to bridge important gaps between United States intervention efforts, public policy and mental health.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Police and Persons with Mental Illness

Description

Mental illness creates a unique challenge for police. Changes in medical infrastructure have left many mentally ill without adequate access to resources or treatment. They often face additional challenges of

Mental illness creates a unique challenge for police. Changes in medical infrastructure have left many mentally ill without adequate access to resources or treatment. They often face additional challenges of substance abuse and homelessness. This has led to increasingly frequent contact with police and a shift from mental illness being treated as a health problem to being treated as a police problem. Police are unable to provide treatment, and are frustrated by the amount of their time consumed by persons with mental illness (PMI) and by the amount of time and effort it takes to connect them with treatment. Due to the unpredictable behavior often caused by mental illness and the way police are trained to deal with uncooperative behavior, persons suffering from mental illness are subject to the use of force by police at a disproportionate rate. Police are trying to combat these problems with the implementation of advanced training and the development of Crisis Intervention Teams and Mobile Response Units, as well as increasing connections with local medical facilities to promote treatment over arrest. Other strategies have been experimented with, both in the United States and across the globe, but there is currently a limited amount of research on how effective these programs are. Anecdotally, the most successful programs seem to be those that take a comprehensive approach to mental illness, creating solutions that include police, medical facilities, courts, dispatchers, first responders, and the community. Due to the limits of programs confined to one institution, it is recommended that treatment be expanded and police receive advanced training in dealing with mentally ill people, as well as involving others in the criminal justice and medical communities so that they provide a coordinated response to PMI.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Culturally sensitive diabetes treatment interventions for Hispanic populations: a systematic review

Description

Background.
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a leading cause of health disparities, among Hispanic populations, which are disproportionately afflicted by T2DM. The growing research strongly argues that diabetes

Background.
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a leading cause of health disparities, among Hispanic populations, which are disproportionately afflicted by T2DM. The growing research strongly argues that diabetes treatment interventions should be culturally sensitive to address the needs of their target populations. Nonetheless, there is little consensus regarding the necessary components of a culturally sensitive intervention. This review will examine the intervention contents and activities, and the strategies that have been implemented into culturally sensitive diabetes treatment interventions. This review will also to observe how interventions handle complex issues such as the heterogeneity of Hispanic populations and communities. The overarching research questions examined in this study were, “What are the core components of the culturally tailored diabetes interventions currently implemented with Hispanic populations in the US, and why are they needed?” and 2) “How are studies evaluating the impact of their interventions, and how can the proposed study designs be improved?”
Method.
A systematic review across 3 databases was used to identify culturally sensitive diabetes treatment interventions (CSDTI) developed for Hispanic populations. Accordingly, we searched for studies designed to treat Hispanic individuals already diagnosed with having T2DM. All identified studies provided information on the core components of these culturally sensitive interventions, while only studies that included a control or comparison group were used to assess how the studies evaluated outcomes.
Results.
First, we examined intervention effects as examined from two study designs. We examined a total of [17] interventions in this section. Our review of one study design (Design #1 Studies) includes 12 studies that developed a culturally sensitive intervention and evaluated it using a one-group pretest posttest design, or did not evaluate their intervention at all. A second study design (Design #2 Studies) includes 5 studies. These consisted of a two-group randomized controlled field study that conducted pre-post analyses of the culturally adapted intervention comparing it against a control or comparison group. The heterogeneity of all studies made a conventional meta-analysis impossible.
Second, another review section focused on examining and describing various culturally sensitive core components, we examined a total of 17 studies to describe the types of culturally sensitive components that were incorporated into the diabetes treatment intervention. This analysis resulted in a list of 11 general types of culturally sensitive components as included within these 17 interventions. Of the articles that used control or comparison groups, the manner in which interventions evaluated different outcome measures and their conclusions regarding success were examined.
Discussion.
The culturally sensitive aspects identified from these articles were used to address diverse issues that included: (a) communication barriers, (b) the inclusion of cultural relevant content, for relevance to Hispanic/Latinx patients’ lives, (c) selecting appropriate channels and settings for interventions, and (d) addressing specific cultural values, traditions, and beliefs that can either help or hinder healthy behaviors. It should be noted that the Hispanic populations are extremely heterogeneous, and so interventions that would be sensitive culturally to some sectors of a Hispanic community may not be sensitive to other Hispanic sectors of that same community. The issue of heterogeneity of Hispanic communities was addressed well by the authors of some articles and ignored by others.
Conclusions.
It was ultimately impossible draw quantitative conclusions regarding the efficacy or effectiveness of these two types of diabetes treatment interventions (CSDTIs) as delivered to their targeted sample of Hispanic participants. An emerging conclusion is that factors including ethics, cost, and lack of community acceptance, may constitute factors contributing to the higher proportion of one-group pre-test post-test designs and lower proportion of rigorous scientific designs. In the latter case, some communities oppose the use of randomized controlled studies within their community, and thus that objection may explain the low numbers of these randomized controlled studies. The use of viable and rigorous alternatives to RCTs have been proposed to address this community concern. In this review, the author sought to conduct comparative studies between culturally adapted interventions and their associated unaltered or minimally altered evidence-based interventions, although there exists various difficulties that are associated with the conduct of these analyses.
Core components of CSDTIs for Hispanic adults were identified, and their purposes were explained. Additionally, suggestions for improvement to studies were made, to aid in improving our knowledge of CSDTIs through future studies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

The Multipolar Moment: Changes in the Global Environment and the Conduct of Humanitarian Intervention

Description

This thesis seeks to analyze the phenomenon of increasing multipolarity in the global environment vis-à-vis the conduct of humanitarian intervention. Established powers, including the United States and United Kingdom, and

This thesis seeks to analyze the phenomenon of increasing multipolarity in the global environment vis-à-vis the conduct of humanitarian intervention. Established powers, including the United States and United Kingdom, and rising, predominantly developing states seem at odds over where to intervene, when, and on what basis. Situating this conflict within the responsibility to protect (R2P) doctrine, which has been the guiding international framework for intervention over the past decade-and-a-half, the research answers whether the processes of multipolarity will ultimately lead to the reconciliation of nation-state interests (cooperation) or unreconciled divergence (competition). Using United Nations Security Council resolutions to temporally track multipolarity and map nations’ language into the rhetorical spaces of humanitarianism and inclinations toward intervention, the research finds support for the proposition that concepts of humanitarian intervention between great and rising powers are more conflictual. Furthermore, nations appear to be clustering into “camps” along broadly humanitarian/interventionist and state sovereigntist lines. To preserve humanitarian intervention in a more multipolar world, its proponents must accommodate diverse nation-state interests, facilitate improved relations among the member states of the U.N. Security Council, and empower regional bodies as partners in alleviating conflict under an R2P mandate.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Adolescent motivation for healthy behaviors: a theory-based enhanced health curriculum for adolescents

Description

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over the past two centuries is potentially diminishing due to the increase in prevalence, severity, and consequences of obesity in children and adolescents related to unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Health behaviors are often established during childhood and adolescence that continue into adulthood. The development and integration of healthy lifestyle behaviors are vital through adolescence. Self-determination theory (SDT) offers a theoretical framework for attempting to understand individual differences in motivation and behavior. Recent studies have primarily focused on how adolescents make choices related to eating behaviors, physical activity, and self-care habits, and how the resultant behaviors are measured. Participants in this study were 63 healthy adolescents enrolled in 9th grade health class. All participants provided baseline data at Time 1 and again following the five-week pretest posttest intervention study at Time 2. This study examined the utility of SDT in the development of the Adolescent Intrinsic Motivation, a healthy lifestyle behavior intervention, using the tenets of SDT to explain healthy lifestyle motivational beliefs in adolescents, along with healthy lifestyle behaviors and knowledge. The AIM intervention study introduced basic health recommendations to adolescents in an autonomy-supportive environment, which has been shown to encourage the adolescent to make healthy behavior choices based on their own interest and enjoyment. Preliminary effects of the study indicated that participants receiving the AIM intervention demonstrated significant differences in motivational beliefs, healthy lifestyle knowledge, as well as healthy lifestyle behaviors from Time 1 (baseline) to Time 2 (post-intervention). Results of this study provide support for the use of SDT to address the competence, relatedness, and autonomy of adolescents in the development of health education material. Testing this intervention in a larger, random sampling of schools within the state, or even in more than one state, with a three- or six-month follow-up would be useful in determining the longer-term effects of the intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Strengthening Relationships among Teachers and Caregivers in Early Care and Education: A Strategy to Prevent Expulsion

Description

Across contexts, researchers have exposed the immense impact that early childhood experiences and high-quality caregiver relationships have on a developing child, which has resulted in much motivation to increase the

Across contexts, researchers have exposed the immense impact that early childhood experiences and high-quality caregiver relationships have on a developing child, which has resulted in much motivation to increase the quality of early care and education (ECE) programs at a national level. Unfortunately, as research has revealed the positive influence that quality ECE has on a child’s ultimate outcomes, it has also shed light on a social problem that intricately affects society: preschool expulsion. To address this issue, several interventions have been created, however the teacher-caregiver relationship has yet to be a central point of solution. Therefore, a relational cultural communication training (RCCT) was developed to support teachers as they work with families whose children are at-risk for expulsion, and it served as the intervention that was studied in this action research project.

This mixed method action research study (MMAR) sought to examine the constructs of empathy and culture as they pertain to teacher-caregiver relationships from the vantage point of the eight ECE teachers that participated in this project. Specifically, interview transcripts and journals were qualitatively assessed to illuminate teacher perspectives on the roles that both culture and empathy play in relationships with caregivers whose children are at-risk for expulsion. Further, the study examined teacher attitudes towards engaging with caregivers before and after the RCCT intervention using interviews, journals and an evidence-based pre- and post-survey tool as data sources. Bioecological systems theory (BST) and relational cultural theory (RCT) framed the research questions that guided this project.

Results suggested that the RCCT was a useful intervention that supported ECE teachers in their ability to connect with caregivers whose children are at-risk. Particularly, findings revealed that (a) ECE teachers do feel that both empathy and culture influence their ability to connect with caregivers, (b) RCCT was helpful in shifting teacher practices with families from an empathy standpoint, and (c) cultural differences and negative interactions adversely informed a teacher’s relational capacity with caregivers, ultimately adversely affecting child outcomes. The discussion of these findings summarizes study conclusions and how they might inform practice, implications for future research and practice, and limitations to consider.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Screening in school-wide positive behavior supports: methodogical comparisons

Description

Many schools have adopted programming designed to promote students' behavioral aptitude. A specific type of programming with this focus is School Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SWPBS), which combines positive behavior

Many schools have adopted programming designed to promote students' behavioral aptitude. A specific type of programming with this focus is School Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SWPBS), which combines positive behavior techniques with a system wide problem solving model. Aspects of this model are still being developed in the research community, including assessment techniques which aid the decision making process. Tools for screening entire student populations are examples of such assessment interests. Although screening tools which have been described as "empirically validated" and "cost effective" have been around since at least 1991, they have yet to become standard practice (Lane, Gresham, & O'Shaughnessy 2002). The lack of widespread implementation to date raises questions regarding their ecological validity and actual cost-effectiveness, leaving the development of useful tools for screening an ongoing project for many researchers. It may be beneficial for educators to expand the range of measurement to include tools which measure the symptoms at the root of the problematic behaviors. Lane, Grasham, and O'Shaughnessy (2002) note the possibility that factors from within a student, including those that are cognitive in nature, may influence not only his or her academic performance, but also aspects of behavior. A line of logic follows wherein measurement of those factors may aid the early identification of students at risk for developing disorders with related symptoms. The validity and practicality of various tools available for screening in SWPBS were investigated, including brief behavior rating scales completed by parents and teachers, as well as performance tasks borrowed from the field of neuropsychology. All instruments showed an ability to predict children's behavior, although not to equal extents. A discussion of practicality and predictive utility of each instrument follows.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012