Matching Items (24)

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The Effect of an Upstander Intervention on Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Bullying and Promoting Upstander Behavior

Description

Research shows that an effective method for decreasing bullying is for bystanders to intervene when they see bullying occur. If students are going to intervene they need to be able

Research shows that an effective method for decreasing bullying is for bystanders to intervene when they see bullying occur. If students are going to intervene they need to be able to not only recognize bullying, but also have strategies to combat it. Students should be able to get this information from their teachers. However, preservice teachers who will one day have their own classroom do not have knowledge of bullying and upstander behavior. We created an online training for preservice teachers to increase their knowledge of bullying and upstander behavior so they could share these practices with their future students and in turn their students could become upstanders and decrease bullying incidents. Implications for future research and policy include repeating the study over a longer period of time, and the inclusion of upstander behavior training into existing preservice teacher training programs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Ending Bullying With Multiple Architectures

Description

Violence in schools occurs throughout America, prevalent to the point of daily happenstance. The epidemic of violence in our society is in sore need of healing efforts. Ending Bullying with

Violence in schools occurs throughout America, prevalent to the point of daily happenstance. The epidemic of violence in our society is in sore need of healing efforts. Ending Bullying with Multiple Architectures focuses on the violence of bullying in young children and adolescents, in an effort to mitigate bullying at a critical age, before it transcends into their adult behavior. Bullying begins in elementary schools, a time when our minds are extremely impressionable and our behavioral habits take birth. Bullying may happen for a certain segment of a person's life, but the effects transcend a person's entire life. People who bully may follow a familial cycle of bullying and people who are bullied may become bullies and start a new cycle. With bullying and aggressive behavior increasing exponentially in schools, our society is growing up in a place where it is acceptable to react aggressively to stressful or undesirable situations. Today, violence in our society infiltrates every aspect of our lives, from road rage, to grocery store quarrels, to family ties breaking, to gun violence in school and public spaces. Unplanned acts of violence occur in "spur of the moments". Is our society so impatient, aggressive, antagonistic, individualistic, and isolated because we have been conditioned as human beings to behave this way? Did we miss our chance to work cordially as a community, peacefully and patiently, because we put progress and productivity in front of community and collaboration? How can architecture slow you down, keep you aware of your surroundings and facilitate collaboration and getting along? Why do we accept abrupt anger and violence, and how can architecture create, improve or encourage positive behavioral habits in our impressionable young minds? Ending Bullying with Multiple Architectures translates existing bullying strategies (social architecture) into physical architectural intervention, in an effort to mitigate bullying at the critical age when behavioral habits take birth. This project challenges efficiency based design in order to complement the human experience. By creating healthier spaces that foster wholeness, we can heal violence at this critical age, and thus hopefully reduce future societal violence as a whole.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Gender Non-Normative Behaviors in the Predictors of Peer Victimization

Description

The main purpose of this thesis was to further explore factors that render particular children more susceptible to bullying and peer victimization. Race, age, and the activities that the children

The main purpose of this thesis was to further explore factors that render particular children more susceptible to bullying and peer victimization. Race, age, and the activities that the children participated in were considered potential predictors of bullying and victimization. Self- and peer-reported data were gathered on 437 first and third grade children (234 boys and 203 girls, M age = 7 years, 6 months), including the frequency of peer victimization and the extent of their engagement in gender-typed activities. Activities were identified as either masculine (e.g., watching sports on television, playing with tools) or feminine (e.g., playing house, cheerleading) according to which sex was mostly likely to engage in them. Mixed support was obtained for the hypothesis that boys are at greater risk for being targets of peer aggression. Specifically, while peer-reports of victimization supported this hypothesis, self-reports revealed no sex differences. Support was obtained for the hypotheses that engaging in cross gender-typed activities would be a stronger risk factor for peer victimization for boys than for girls.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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A New Approach to Bullying

Description

A New Approach to Bullying is an anti-bullying workbook designed for middle school aged students. It is intended to accompany an anti-bullying curriculum, teaching students who are being bullied how

A New Approach to Bullying is an anti-bullying workbook designed for middle school aged students. It is intended to accompany an anti-bullying curriculum, teaching students who are being bullied how to deal with the instances as well as educating all students about the harmful effects of bullying behavior.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Finding the Self: Exploration of Societal Institutions and Forces on Family Overshadowing

Description

This thesis aims to explore the power that my personal struggle with sibling overshadowing and bullying had on my personal development, perspective, and character. To accomplish this analysis, I review

This thesis aims to explore the power that my personal struggle with sibling overshadowing and bullying had on my personal development, perspective, and character. To accomplish this analysis, I review many current theories in the areas of self-identity, self-confidence, and sibling relationships. I find that there exist theories from psychologists and sociologists, such as Stets, Brody, Kohlberg, and Hetherington, that can provide insight as to why I felt as I did. I discover scientific concepts that explain my stress from being constantly compared to very accomplished siblings. Also, I find that there exists significant research that confirms my inability to trust compliments and feedback in light of at-times low self-esteem. In this personal story, I will apply sociological truths to help decipher my struggle with academic achievement and overshadowing, confidence, and identity. The hope is that this explanation may provide assistance to others in similar circumstances.

In Section 1, I highlighted the 8-year struggle that I faced that had a central focus and emphasis on bullying. I discussed many important ideals, including how grave the bullying in elementary and middle school was and how it shaped me as an individual. I also discussed how sibling overshadowing and comparison contributed to my struggle and growth over the 8-year period in chronological order.

After telling the story in Section 1, I then discussed and did an unbiased theory exploration that attempted to discuss and uncover the theories, relationships, and trends found across three central “themes” presented in Section 1: Sibling Relationships, Self-Identity, and Self-Confidence. I discussed what theories were argued and presented across many famous and well-known researchers, how their work relates to the central theme of interest, and how these theories relate to each other. I found that there were many theories from Stets, Brody, Kohlberg, and Hetherington that provided insight as to why I felt weak and frail. I also found that there was significant research that confirmed my inability to trust compliments and feedback. I lastly discussed some opposing theories by individuals who argued against these same ideas along with the respective amount of weight that they carry over others.

In Section 3, I then took the theories, trends, and relationships presented on these themes in Section 2 from various researchers and integrated them with Section 1, my life experience. Section 3 represents a hybrid discussion of how the theories argued, debated, and explored by researchers relate specifically to moments throughout my life and 8-year struggle. In this section, my goal is to help readers understand how these theories can or can’t relate to someone’s personal experience. I also discussed which theories carry more weight than others based on the volume of research conducted.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Aggression, victimization, and social prominence in early adolescent girls and boys

Description

Although aggression is sometimes thought to be maladaptive, evolutionary theories of resource control and dominance posit that aggression may be used to gain and maintain high social prominence within the

Although aggression is sometimes thought to be maladaptive, evolutionary theories of resource control and dominance posit that aggression may be used to gain and maintain high social prominence within the peer group. The success of using aggression to increase social prominence may depend on the form of aggression used (relational versus physical), the gender of the aggressor, and the prominence of the victim. Thus, the current study examined the associations between aggression and victimization and social prominence. In addition, the current study extended previous research by examining multiple forms of aggression and victimization and conceptualizing and measuring social prominence using social network analysis. Participants were 339 6th grade students from ethnically diverse backgrounds (50.4% girls). Participants completed a peer nomination measure assessing relational and physical aggression and victimization. They also nominated friends within their grade, which were used to calculate three indices of social prominence, using social network analysis. As expected, results indicated that relational aggression was associated with higher social prominence, particularly for girls, whereas physical aggression was less robustly associated with social prominence. Results for victimization were less clear, but suggested that, for girls, those at mid-levels of social prominence were most highly victimized. For boys, results indicated that those both high and low in prominence were most highly relationally victimized, and those at mid-levels of prominence were most highly physically victimized. These findings help inform intervention work focused on decreasing overall levels of aggressive behavior.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Schooling gender: identity construction in high school

Description

For many adolescents, high school is a critical period of self-awareness, peer-influence, and identity construction. During this volatile period, young people explore how to express themselves in ways that range

For many adolescents, high school is a critical period of self-awareness, peer-influence, and identity construction. During this volatile period, young people explore how to express themselves in ways that range from conformity to non-conformity and transgression. This is particularly true when it comes to young people's understanding and expression of gender identity. For some youth, their personal form(s) of gender expression align neatly with social expectations; for others, it does not. When gender expression does not align with social expectations, students may be vulnerable to bullying or harassment by peers or adults. Often, youth who are policed and regulated by their classmates through bullying (or harassment, depending upon the relevant or implemented policy) are targeted based on their perceived identity, be that racial, ethnic, citizenship, or, most frequently, gender and sexuality. This project advances the need for research done from a critical youth studies perspective (both methodologically and ethically) and provides new insight into the types of language and practices used by youth to express, perform and "do" gender. Utilizing qualitative methodology, including participant observation, focus group and individual interviews, surveys, and the collection and content analysis of school ephemera, this research investigated how high school students navigate gender identity amidst other intersecting identities. This project examined how youth both "do" and "perform" gender in their everyday lives as high school students. Their gender identity is frequently understood amidst other intersecting identities, particularly sexual orientation, religion and race. These youth also pointed to several important influences in how they understand their own gender, and the gender identity of those around them, including media and peer groups. Because this research took place at two charter art schools, the findings also provided a framework for understanding how these two schools, and charter art schools more generally, provide alternative spaces for young people to experiment and play with their identity construction. Findings indicate that youth are forced to navigate and construct their gender identity amidst many conflicting and contradictory ideologies. Schools, media, and peer groups all heavily influence the way young people understand themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Inhibitory control, negative emotionality, and threat appraisals as predictors of children's status in the context of bullying

Description

A model of the effects of early adolescents' temperament (negative emotionality and inhibitory control) and threat appraisals on resulting status in the bullying dynamic was examined. Specifically, I examined the

A model of the effects of early adolescents' temperament (negative emotionality and inhibitory control) and threat appraisals on resulting status in the bullying dynamic was examined. Specifically, I examined the hypothesis that negative emotionality and passive victim versus bully-victim status would be mediated by threat appraisals, and that mediated effect would be moderated by levels of inhibitory control. The study used a sample of 56 early adolescents ages 7–16. Temperament characteristics were measured using the EATQ–R (Capaldi & Rothbart, 1992). Threat appraisals were assessed using items from Hunter, Boyle, and Warden (2004). Bullying and victimization were measured using items created for this study and additional cyber bullying items (Smith, Mahdavi, Carvalho, & Tippett, 2006). A multinomial logistic regression and test of moderated mediation were analyzed to examine the model (Hayes, 2012). Higher levels of negative emotionality were correlated with being a victim of bullying. The moderated mediation model was not statistically significant, however the direction of the patterns fit the hypotheses. Future directions and limitations are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Experiences of Bullying Among African American Male Adolescents and Their Parents/Guardians

Description

This study is an exploratory phenomenological study regarding experiences of bullying among African American male adolescents (AAMAs) and their parents/guardians. Given the population of interest, a critical framework was

This study is an exploratory phenomenological study regarding experiences of bullying among African American male adolescents (AAMAs) and their parents/guardians. Given the population of interest, a critical framework was used. The critical framework included critical race theory (CRT), Black feminist thought (BFT), and altruism born of suffering (ABS). According to the 2015 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, AAMAs in high school reported lower levels of bullying victimization at school and online compared to all other student groups in their data. This study was designed as a mixed-methods study with a strong qualitative component and a supplementary quantitative portion. The sample included 16 AAMAs and one parent/guardian per youth (N = 32).

The findings were organized into themes for the three areas of study: perceptions of bullying (i.e., emotion, entertainment, fighting, structure, and home life), responses to bullying (i.e., self-preservation, suffering, passivity, and standing up for other people), and barriers/supports of prosocial active bystandership of bullying (i.e., barriers, education, and taking action). The quantitative results indicated that all of the participants observed bullying (N = 32), almost all of the participants had been bullied (n = 29) and a strong majority (n = 25) experienced racialized suffering. The results of a matched pairs t-test of factor one of the Colorblind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS) and factor five the Bystander Intervention of Bullying and Racial Harassment Scale (BIBRS) indicated these measures may not be a good fit for this population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Bullying and Performance Anxiety in Classically Trained Singers

Description

A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used

A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used to assess this hypothesis. The survey was compiled using standard psychological and current performance anxiety questionnaires with additional questions created by the author. The data were analyzed using a Pearson Product-Moment Correlation, a regression analysis, and an Analysis of Variance.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017