Matching Items (18)

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Sexual Assault on College Campuses: An Analysis of Prevention Methods

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to examine the background of sexual assault on college campuses and identify prevention methods utilized by both Arizona State University and other colleges in

The purpose of this thesis is to examine the background of sexual assault on college campuses and identify prevention methods utilized by both Arizona State University and other colleges in the United States. An analysis of these prevention methods have led to the formulation of three core components in the solution to the sexual assault epidemic on college campuses. Recommendations for ASU to combat a culture of sexual violence are provided based on this research along with rationale as to why they are the best methods to focus on.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Sexual Violence against Women during Conflict

Description

The purpose of this honors thesis is to explain the varying levels of sexual violence against women across time, location and conflicts. Violence against civilians is utilized as an independent

The purpose of this honors thesis is to explain the varying levels of sexual violence against women across time, location and conflicts. Violence against civilians is utilized as an independent variable to measure if the level of violence of a pre-conflict environment widens the space for the exploitation of sexual violence. Women's status is used as an additional independent variable in order to measure if a pre-conflict environment that promotes gender equality moderates the presence of sexual violence as it discourages unequal power dynamics. GDP per capita and population will be used as control variables in order to include consideration of state capacity. Sexual violence will be the dependent variable. In order to statistically measure and depict the relationships between these variables, bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regressions will be utilized. The bivariate correlations showed that as civilian violence increased, sexual violence increased as well, but as women's status increased, sexual violence decreased. The linear regression models found that state actors and rebel groups yielded differing results. For state actors, the increase in women's status failed to moderate the level of sexual violence as an increase in civilian violence and women's status resulted in an increase in sexual violence. However, for rebel groups, an increase in civilian violence and women's status led to a decrease in sexual violence, thereby depicting women's status as a moderating factor. This creates a problem in identifying one or a few factors that predominately lead to an increase in sexual violence; such identification is key for the development of preventative policy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Effectiveness of ASU Wellness' Sexual Violence Prevention Initiatives

Description

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their campuses, but many do not examine their programs to determine if they are actually effective in increasing students' knowledge on consent and therefore reducing rates of sexual violence on their campuses. This study examines a sexual violence prevention program at Arizona State University called Consent 101, given by the ASU Wellness Department. This research seeks to determine if attending the presentation increases students' knowledge about the conditions of consent; specifically, if students are more likely to correctly answer a question regarding sobriety and consent after viewing the presentation. The hypothesis is that attending the Consent 101 presentation increases the likelihood that students will perceive that people must be sober in order to consent to sexual activities. A survey was used to test students' knowledge about consent and sexual violence, as well as their attitudes. Some students took the survey prior to attending the presentation while others took it after, allowing the groups to be compared to determine effectiveness. This study specifically focuses on whether students correctly choose true, incorrectly choose false, or choose don't know when given the statement "people must be sober in order to give valid consent to sex". There were 685 participants in the study. The "before" group contained 59% of the total participants, while the "after" group contained 41%. In the before group, 87.1% correctly answered true, 6.43% incorrectly answered false, and 6.18% answered don't know. In the after group, 85.71% answered true, 12.09% answered false, and 2.13% answered don't know. The results were significant and the hypothesis was not supported, meaning students were more likely to incorrectly answer the question after the presentation than before. There are multiple explanations for why this was found, including: different pre- and post-groups, misinterpreting the question and resistance to consent education. Ideas for future research and ways to increase effectiveness are provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Exploring Sexual Violence Victimization at Arizona State University

Description

For my honors thesis project in Barrett, the Honors College, I conducted an online college survey that measured student attitudes and perceptions with regard to gender, sexual assault, and domestic

For my honors thesis project in Barrett, the Honors College, I conducted an online college survey that measured student attitudes and perceptions with regard to gender, sexual assault, and domestic violence. In doing so, I also asked students situational questions about their experiences with sexual violence. The research question for the project centered around hidden victims who have been affected by gender-based violence but have yet to report the incident to law enforcement or university officials, despite a number of prominent educational and prevention campaigns on campus and in mainstream media. At the conclusion of the Spring 2016 semester, I received 683 responses from current students at Arizona State University. For the majority of situational questions, 20-30% of individuals answered "yes" to experiencing incidents of sexual violence, many of which focused on if someone had used alcohol/drugs, threats, or physical force to obtain sexual intercourse. For the survey, 11% of women said yes to the question, "have you ever been raped?" Additionally, a significant number of students hesitate to report incidents to law enforcement or university officials because: (1) they were ashamed or embarrassed, (2) wanted to forget it happened, and (3) believed it was a private matter that they wanted to deal with on their own. With this information, university administrators can develop a better understanding of the ASU campus culture as it relates to sexual violence. Additionally, organizational and institutional efforts can be organized and designed to meet the specific needs of our student body with the goal of ultimately reducing the number of sexual assaults that take place.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Honest Intentions & Unforeseen Consequences: The unintended negative effects of the international focus upon wartime sexual violence

Description

Throughout the last two decades, the topic of wartime sexual violence has received significant attention from the international community. Despite honest intentions, this recent focus, by way of the framing

Throughout the last two decades, the topic of wartime sexual violence has received significant attention from the international community. Despite honest intentions, this recent focus, by way of the framing the issue has received, has produced a range of unintended negative consequences. These consequences fall into one of four overarching themes: a) effects upon victims, b) issue displacement, c) competition among NGOs, and d) incentives for combatants. Unfortunately, the world is largely unaware or unwilling to confront the problems caused by their well-intended activism. If left unnoticed, these unintended effects threaten to maintain, and perhaps exacerbate, the prevalence of wartime sexual violence. The international community would be wise to acknowledge the results of its misguided attempts of activism and explore new strategies to avoid previous pitfalls.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Same Bed

Description

Same Bed is a twelve-piece book of poetry that explores the theme of sexual violence. The speaker of the poems is processing the trauma surrounding her rape which leads her

Same Bed is a twelve-piece book of poetry that explores the theme of sexual violence. The speaker of the poems is processing the trauma surrounding her rape which leads her to explore her own family's dynamics regarding gender, power, and acknowledgment of sexuality. The speaker also observes the broader issue of how society reacts to rape and the effects that can have on a survivor of sexual violence. In the peak of the manuscript, the speaker pieces together part of her own police report, pinning her own voice and perspective against her rapists.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Bystander Intervention: An Intercontinental Analysis

Description

This exploratory study focuses on answering the following research questions: How can college communities catalyze interventions in potential situations of sexual violence? What do bystander intervention behaviors and programs look

This exploratory study focuses on answering the following research questions: How can college communities catalyze interventions in potential situations of sexual violence? What do bystander intervention behaviors and programs look like across diverse college communities? Data was collected through key informant interviews with professionals in the field of sexual violence prevention, preferably holding positions in universities of participating countries and through student focus groups. The following countries participated in this study: Ireland, Spain, Tanzania, Australia and New Zealand. The study requests for increased international collaboration between partners across the globe in order to improve bystander intervention programs within universities. In addition, the study provides guidance for future research surrounding bystander intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Sexual Violence Prevention and Leadership Development Program for Sorority Women

Description

Sexual violence is a serious epidemic plaguing college campuses in the United States. At Arizona State University, students are expected to care for themselves, each other, and their community. To

Sexual violence is a serious epidemic plaguing college campuses in the United States. At Arizona State University, students are expected to care for themselves, each other, and their community. To help foster this community of care, ASU provides various resources and educational programs to teach students, staff, and faculty about sexual violence and their role in its prevention. Students, staff, and faculty have the ability to manipulate their environment to discourage sexual violence and encourage a culture in which sexual violence is not tolerated. As a student programming coordinator for Arizona State's Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Program (SVPEP), I have worked in collaboration with SVPEP Staff, the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life and the Panhellenic Council to develop the Sexual Violence Prevention and Leadership Development Program for Sorority Women (SSVLP). The SSVLP is a six week, comprehensive sexual violence prevention program that provides emerging leaders in the sorority community with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to facilitate change in the culture of violence by taking action in their own community. The following project is consists of an overview of the program, evidence that the program helps to change behaviors and attitudes, and a participant weekly workbook that program participants are required to bring with them to their session each week.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Automating Genocide: Forced Pregnancies during the Cambodian and Bosnian Genocides

Description

Forced pregnancy has been and remains a tactic of implementing genocide and inflicting long-lasting damage on a population. Forced marriages during the Cambodian genocide (1975-1979) and rape camps established during

Forced pregnancy has been and remains a tactic of implementing genocide and inflicting long-lasting damage on a population. Forced marriages during the Cambodian genocide (1975-1979) and rape camps established during the Bosnian genocide (1992-1995) are two of many ways in which forced pregnancies can be implemented. This comparative study has identified social constructs within Bosnian and Cambodian cultures that allowed forced pregnancy to impact these populations. In the context of the Cambodian genocide, the Khmer Rouge implemented forced marriages in order to reproduce an agricultural labor force that would sustain the state of Democratic Kampuchea without foreign aid. The cultural construct of marriage promoted childbearing and sustained these marriages even after the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime. The Bosnian genocide, on the other hand, was an ethnic cleansing against Bosnian Muslims. Serbian forces established rape camps to impregnate Bosnian Muslim women in order to stigmatize them to the extent that they would (culturally) no longer be able to bear children for their own ethnic community. The cultural constructs of virginity and patrilineal descent acted as key factors in the effectiveness of forced pregnancy as a method of ethnic cleansing. While Bosnian Muslim rape camp survivors faced stigma for having been raped and for keeping their children if they chose to, Cambodian survivors would not. Cambodian women faced social expectations to stay in their marriages and keep their children in order to fulfill their duties as wives and mothers. In Bosnia, however, no social construct existed to support children born outside of marriage. In addition to these cultural constructs, various other factors influenced survivors' attitudes towards their children, including the presence of third party rapists in the Cambodian genocide and the fact that many Bosnian Muslim survivors did not know the identity of the father of their children. Comparative analysis of these two genocides has contributed to a more holistic understanding of the impacts of genocide and has informed how forced pregnancy operates across multiple cultural ideologies and lifestyles.

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Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Sexual Violence and Exploitation in Syrian Women Seeking Refuge from Civil War: The Role of the International Community in Providing Safety

Description

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and fear of sexual violence. Sexual violence against Syrian women is life altering because of the high value the culture places on virtue and modesty; a woman who is known to have been raped faces shame, possible disenfranchisement by her family, and is at high risk for suicide and in some extreme, but few cases, being murdered by a family member in an honor killing. However, once these refugees arrive they are still threatened not only with sexual violence, but also with sexual exploitation. Sexual violence is devastating to women and families. The international community must work to combat it by helping host countries to prevent the violence, assist victims, prosecute perpetrators, and create safe environments for female refugees. Human rights advocates should look within the philosophy of Islam to encourage gender equality ethics already present therein.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05