Matching Items (18)

Mobile Waterway Monitor

Description

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short, the Mobile Waterway Monitor excels in size constraints, flexibility, extensibility,

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short, the Mobile Waterway Monitor excels in size constraints, flexibility, extensibility, and capability. This current following monitor can show both measured trends like pH and interpolated trends like water speed, river contours, and elevation drop. The MWM strikes a balance between accuracy, portability, and being multi-purpose.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Disruption: The Effects of Cyberterrorism on the Security of the United States

Description

As technology becomes more available to the public, cybercriminals are able to utilize these tools to circumvent outdated modes of protection and steal this information. My aim with my thesis is to understand the effects of cyberterror and cybercrime on

As technology becomes more available to the public, cybercriminals are able to utilize these tools to circumvent outdated modes of protection and steal this information. My aim with my thesis is to understand the effects of cyberterror and cybercrime on the United States and the world and help spread awareness to the public and encourage proactivity in taking the proper steps to protect your information and stop those who would try and take it.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

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Thermal Interface Materials

Description

This thesis project explains what thermal interface materials (TIMs) are, what they are used for, and how to measure their properties. Thermal interface materials are typically either a grease like paste or a soft polymer pad that is placed between

This thesis project explains what thermal interface materials (TIMs) are, what they are used for, and how to measure their properties. Thermal interface materials are typically either a grease like paste or a soft polymer pad that is placed between two solids to increase the heat transfer rate. Solids in contact with each other experience a very large thermal contact resistance, this creates a thermal bottleneck which severely decreases the heat transfer from one solid to another. To solve this, particles with a high thermal conductivity are used as filler material in either a grease or polymer. A common application for TIMs is in computer components, where a TIM is used to remove the heat generated from computer chips. These materials allow for computer chips to run faster without overheating or throttling performance. However, further improvements to TIMs are still desired, which are needed for more powerful computer chips. In this work, a Stepped Bar Apparatus (SBA) is used to evaluate the thermal properties of TIMs. The SBA is based on Fourier’s Law of one-dimensional heat transfer. This work explains the fundamentals of the SBA measurement, and develops a reliable way to confirm the SBA’s measurement consistency through the use of reference samples. Furthermore, this work evaluates the effects of volume fraction and magnetic alignment on the performance of nickel flakes mixed into a polymer to create a soft TIM composite pad. Magnets are used to align the nickel flakes into a column like arrangement in the direction that heat will travel. Magnetic alignment increases the thermal conductivity of the composite pads, and has peak performance at low compression.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-12

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Fiction's Role in Science and Society: An Analysis and Implementation

Description

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the other hand, provides an elegant solution by exploring the world

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the other hand, provides an elegant solution by exploring the world through a myriad point of views including complete omniscience. This thesis explores the link between journalism and fiction by taking real-world scenarios and exploring them without journalism's limitations. It includes three novellas totaling 25,000 words drawn from true-to-life research papers, news stories and manifestos to paint a realistic picture of a technological reality in the near future, a style of writing one might call futurecasting. The thesis also contains an analysis of the techniques used in contemporary fiction and an analysis of their implementation within the novellas. The goal of the novellas is to let researchers to explore the impact of their work before its mass dissemination in order to shape societal, national and international policy responsibly. Similarly, novellas like this and others similar allow society to discover the beauty of science through fiction. These are some of fiction's greatest roles in science and society.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

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Assurance management framework for access control systems

Description

Access control is one of the most fundamental security mechanisms used in the design and management of modern information systems. However, there still exists an open question on how formal access control models can be automatically analyzed and fully realized

Access control is one of the most fundamental security mechanisms used in the design and management of modern information systems. However, there still exists an open question on how formal access control models can be automatically analyzed and fully realized in secure system development. Furthermore, specifying and managing access control policies are often error-prone due to the lack of effective analysis mechanisms and tools. In this dissertation, I present an Assurance Management Framework (AMF) that is designed to cope with various assurance management requirements from both access control system development and policy-based computing. On one hand, the AMF framework facilitates comprehensive analysis and thorough realization of formal access control models in secure system development. I demonstrate how this method can be applied to build role-based access control systems by adopting the NIST/ANSI RBAC standard as an underlying security model. On the other hand, the AMF framework ensures the correctness of access control policies in policy-based computing through automated reasoning techniques and anomaly management mechanisms. A systematic method is presented to formulate XACML in Answer Set Programming (ASP) that allows users to leverage off-the-shelf ASP solvers for a variety of analysis services. In addition, I introduce a novel anomaly management mechanism, along with a grid-based visualization approach, which enables systematic and effective detection and resolution of policy anomalies. I further evaluate the AMF framework through modeling and analyzing multiparty access control in Online Social Networks (OSNs). A MultiParty Access Control (MPAC) model is formulated to capture the essence of multiparty authorization requirements in OSNs. In particular, I show how AMF can be applied to OSNs for identifying and resolving privacy conflicts, and representing and reasoning about MPAC model and policy. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed methodology, a suite of proof-of-concept prototype systems is implemented as well.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Systematic policy analysis and management

Description

With the advent of technologies such as web services, service oriented architecture and cloud computing, modern organizations have to deal with policies such as Firewall policies to secure the networks, XACML (eXtensible Access Control Markup Language) policies for controlling the

With the advent of technologies such as web services, service oriented architecture and cloud computing, modern organizations have to deal with policies such as Firewall policies to secure the networks, XACML (eXtensible Access Control Markup Language) policies for controlling the access to critical information as well as resources. Management of these policies is an extremely important task in order to avoid unintended security leakages via illegal accesses, while maintaining proper access to services for legitimate users. Managing and maintaining access control policies manually over long period of time is an error prone task due to their inherent complex nature. Existing tools and mechanisms for policy management use different approaches for different types of policies. This research thesis represents a generic framework to provide an unified approach for policy analysis and management of different types of policies. Generic approach captures the common semantics and structure of different access control policies with the notion of policy ontology. Policy ontology representation is then utilized for effectively analyzing and managing the policies. This thesis also discusses a proof-of-concept implementation of the proposed generic framework and demonstrates how efficiently this unified approach can be used for analysis and management of different types of access control policies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

Lewis, William

Description

Bill Lewis, Vice Provost for Computing, came to ASU in 1966 to join the Industrial Engineering faculty. He retired in 2008. Important interview stories include ones involving: FOUNDING PROGRAMS (computer science); COMPUTERS (student information system, computing support); TEMPE CAMPUS (1966,

Bill Lewis, Vice Provost for Computing, came to ASU in 1966 to join the Industrial Engineering faculty. He retired in 2008. Important interview stories include ones involving: FOUNDING PROGRAMS (computer science); COMPUTERS (student information system, computing support); TEMPE CAMPUS (1966, changes); DEPARTMENTS (Industrial Engineering); PEOPLE (Lee P Thompson, Milt Glick); and BUILDINGS (Computer Commons).

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010-01-22

Borovansky, Vladimir

Description

Vladimir Borovansky, ASU Noble Library Research librarian, joined ASU in May 1968. Interesting stories include:
1) the development of the NOBLE LIBRARY,
2) GOING DIGITAL - progression in the use of digital searching from offline searches to ARPANET to Google,

Vladimir Borovansky, ASU Noble Library Research librarian, joined ASU in May 1968. Interesting stories include:
1) the development of the NOBLE LIBRARY,
2) GOING DIGITAL - progression in the use of digital searching from offline searches to ARPANET to Google,
3), the creation of a Patent Depository Library and
4) an important trait of being a research librarian, i.e., know your audience

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-02-19

McNeill, Connie

Description

Connie McNeill came to ASU in the summer of 1976 as head of the payroll project and retired in the summer of 2006 as the West Campus Assistant Vice Provost for Information Technology. Interesting stories include:
1) her role in

Connie McNeill came to ASU in the summer of 1976 as head of the payroll project and retired in the summer of 2006 as the West Campus Assistant Vice Provost for Information Technology. Interesting stories include:
1) her role in developing both academic and administrative computing services on the Tempe and West Campuses
2) bringing PC’s onto the Tempe Campus
3) the “Space Wars”
4) short stories about Roland Haden and Darel Eschbach

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2012-02-29

Anderson, Doug

Description

Doug Anderson came to ASU in the summer of 1979 and joined the newly formed College of Public Programs. He left ASU as the Director of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Important ASU stories include:
1)

Doug Anderson came to ASU in the summer of 1979 and joined the newly formed College of Public Programs. He left ASU as the Director of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Important ASU stories include:
1) the birth of the COLLEGE OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS,
2) the Tempe Campus SIZE and working ENVIRONMENT in 1979.
3) the naming of the WALTER CRONKITE School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and
4) the importance of the 1987 accreditation as a turning point for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-03-12