Matching Items (16)

Eschbach, Barbara

Description

Barbara Eschbach came to ASU in 1977 and worked four years as the Administrative Assistant for the Dean of the College of Architecture. In 1981, she moved to Computing

Barbara Eschbach came to ASU in 1977 and worked four years as the Administrative Assistant for the Dean of the College of Architecture. In 1981, she moved to Computing Services, eventually becoming Director of IT Facilities and Resources Administration, retiring in 2006. She returned as Program Coordinator for Economic Affairs, again retiring in 2008. As the Facility Manager for IT, she played a key role in the construction of the Computing Commons Building and in the renovation of Old Main to house the campus’ telecommunications hub.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2012-04-24 to 2012-05-16

Lewis, William

Description

Bill Lewis, Vice Provost for Computing, came to ASU in 1966 to join the Industrial Engineering faculty. He retired in 2008. Important interview stories include ones involving: FOUNDING PROGRAMS

Bill Lewis, Vice Provost for Computing, came to ASU in 1966 to join the Industrial Engineering faculty. He retired in 2008. Important interview stories include ones involving: FOUNDING PROGRAMS (computer science); COMPUTERS (student information system, computing support); TEMPE CAMPUS (1966, changes); DEPARTMENTS (Industrial Engineering); PEOPLE (Lee P Thompson, Milt Glick); and BUILDINGS (Computer Commons).

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-01-22

Borovansky, Vladimir

Description

Vladimir Borovansky, ASU Noble Library Research librarian, joined ASU in May 1968. Interesting stories include:
1) the development of the NOBLE LIBRARY,
2) GOING DIGITAL - progression in the use

Vladimir Borovansky, ASU Noble Library Research librarian, joined ASU in May 1968. Interesting stories include:
1) the development of the NOBLE LIBRARY,
2) GOING DIGITAL - progression in the use of digital searching from offline searches to ARPANET to Google,
3), the creation of a Patent Depository Library and
4) an important trait of being a research librarian, i.e., know your audience

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-02-19

Mobile Waterway Monitor

Description

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short,

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short, the Mobile Waterway Monitor excels in size constraints, flexibility, extensibility, and capability. This current following monitor can show both measured trends like pH and interpolated trends like water speed, river contours, and elevation drop. The MWM strikes a balance between accuracy, portability, and being multi-purpose.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Are College Students Equipped with Basic Knowledge on Data Security?

Description

How prepared are individuals to work in an environment with sensitive information? Do business students believe a data security course would be a valuable addition to their curriculum? This study

How prepared are individuals to work in an environment with sensitive information? Do business students believe a data security course would be a valuable addition to their curriculum? This study investigates W.P. Carey's role in preparing its students for jobs in which they most likely will have to handle large amounts of important data. Roughly 500 students across varying majors and years of education in the W.P. Carey School of Business answered an assortment of questions on their computer habits, and responded to various scenarios to test their knowledge. The survey targeted three specific areas (Software Updates, Password Protection, and Phishing) which was believed to be most pertinent to the students' future roles as professionals. While a large number of those surveyed (roughly 65%) responded well to most questions, nearly a third of all the responses received indicated cause for concern or an indication of a lack of knowledge. It was suggested (and many respondents agreed) that further education be provided to students for their own well-being in addition to the wellbeing of their future employers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Fiction's Role in Science and Society: An Analysis and Implementation

Description

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the other hand, provides an elegant solution by exploring the world through a myriad point of views including complete omniscience. This thesis explores the link between journalism and fiction by taking real-world scenarios and exploring them without journalism's limitations. It includes three novellas totaling 25,000 words drawn from true-to-life research papers, news stories and manifestos to paint a realistic picture of a technological reality in the near future, a style of writing one might call futurecasting. The thesis also contains an analysis of the techniques used in contemporary fiction and an analysis of their implementation within the novellas. The goal of the novellas is to let researchers to explore the impact of their work before its mass dissemination in order to shape societal, national and international policy responsibly. Similarly, novellas like this and others similar allow society to discover the beauty of science through fiction. These are some of fiction's greatest roles in science and society.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Disruption: The Effects of Cyberterrorism on the Security of the United States

Description

As technology becomes more available to the public, cybercriminals are able to utilize these tools to circumvent outdated modes of protection and steal this information. My aim with my thesis

As technology becomes more available to the public, cybercriminals are able to utilize these tools to circumvent outdated modes of protection and steal this information. My aim with my thesis is to understand the effects of cyberterror and cybercrime on the United States and the world and help spread awareness to the public and encourage proactivity in taking the proper steps to protect your information and stop those who would try and take it.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Thermal Interface Materials

Description

This thesis project explains what thermal interface materials (TIMs) are, what they are used for, and how to measure their properties. Thermal interface materials are typically either a grease like

This thesis project explains what thermal interface materials (TIMs) are, what they are used for, and how to measure their properties. Thermal interface materials are typically either a grease like paste or a soft polymer pad that is placed between two solids to increase the heat transfer rate. Solids in contact with each other experience a very large thermal contact resistance, this creates a thermal bottleneck which severely decreases the heat transfer from one solid to another. To solve this, particles with a high thermal conductivity are used as filler material in either a grease or polymer. A common application for TIMs is in computer components, where a TIM is used to remove the heat generated from computer chips. These materials allow for computer chips to run faster without overheating or throttling performance. However, further improvements to TIMs are still desired, which are needed for more powerful computer chips. In this work, a Stepped Bar Apparatus (SBA) is used to evaluate the thermal properties of TIMs. The SBA is based on Fourier’s Law of one-dimensional heat transfer. This work explains the fundamentals of the SBA measurement, and develops a reliable way to confirm the SBA’s measurement consistency through the use of reference samples. Furthermore, this work evaluates the effects of volume fraction and magnetic alignment on the performance of nickel flakes mixed into a polymer to create a soft TIM composite pad. Magnets are used to align the nickel flakes into a column like arrangement in the direction that heat will travel. Magnetic alignment increases the thermal conductivity of the composite pads, and has peak performance at low compression.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Software techniques in the compromise of energy and accuracy

Description

Software has a great impact on the energy efficiency of any computing system--it can manage the components of a system efficiently or inefficiently. The impact of software is amplified in

Software has a great impact on the energy efficiency of any computing system--it can manage the components of a system efficiently or inefficiently. The impact of software is amplified in the context of a wearable computing system used for activity recognition. The design space this platform opens up is immense and encompasses sensors, feature calculations, activity classification algorithms, sleep schedules, and transmission protocols. Design choices in each of these areas impact energy use, overall accuracy, and usefulness of the system. This thesis explores methods software can influence the trade-off between energy consumption and system accuracy. In general the more energy a system consumes the more accurate will be. We explore how finding the transitions between human activities is able to reduce the energy consumption of such systems without reducing much accuracy. We introduce the Log-likelihood Ratio Test as a method to detect transitions, and explore how choices of sensor, feature calculations, and parameters concerning time segmentation affect the accuracy of this method. We discovered an approximate 5X increase in energy efficiency could be achieved with only a 5% decrease in accuracy. We also address how a system's sleep mode, in which the processor enters a low-power state and sensors are turned off, affects a wearable computing platform that does activity recognition. We discuss the energy trade-offs in each stage of the activity recognition process. We find that careful analysis of these parameters can result in great increases in energy efficiency if small compromises in overall accuracy can be tolerated. We call this the ``Great Compromise.'' We found a 6X increase in efficiency with a 7% decrease in accuracy. We then consider how wireless transmission of data affects the overall energy efficiency of a wearable computing platform. We find that design decisions such as feature calculations and grouping size have a great impact on the energy consumption of the system because of the amount of data that is stored and transmitted. For example, storing and transmitting vector-based features such as FFT or DCT do not compress the signal and would use more energy than storing and transmitting the raw signal. The effect of grouping size on energy consumption depends on the feature. For scalar features energy consumption is proportional in the inverse of grouping size, so it's reduced as grouping size goes up. For features that depend on the grouping size, such as FFT, energy increases with the logarithm of grouping size, so energy consumption increases slowly as grouping size increases. We find that compressing data through activity classification and transition detection significantly reduces energy consumption and that the energy consumed for the classification overhead is negligible compared to the energy savings from data compression. We provide mathematical models of energy usage and data generation, and test our ideas using a mobile computing platform, the Texas Instruments Chronos watch.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Decision factors for E-waste in northen Mexico: to waste or trade

Description

Electronic waste (E-waste) is a concern, because of the increasing volume of materials being disposed of. There are economical, social and environmental implications derived from these materials. For example, the

Electronic waste (E-waste) is a concern, because of the increasing volume of materials being disposed of. There are economical, social and environmental implications derived from these materials. For example, the international trade of used computers creates jobs, but the recovery from valuable materials is technically challenging and currently there are environmental and health problems derived from inappropriate recycling practices. Forecasting the flows of used computers and e-waste materials supports the prevention of environmental impacts. However, the nature of these material flows is complex. There are technological geographical and cultural factors that affect how users purchase, store or dispose of their equipment. The result of these dynamics is a change in the composition and volume of these flows. Collectors are affected by these factors and the presence of markets, labor and transportation costs. In northern Mexico, there is an international flow of new and used computers between Mexico and the United States and an internal flow of materials and products among Mexican cities. In order to understand the behavior of these flows a field study was carried out in 8 different Mexican cities. Stake holders were interviewed and through a structured analysis the system and the relevant stakeholders were expressed as Data Flow Diagrams in order; to understand the critical parts from the system. The results show that Mexican cities have important qualitative differences. For example, location and size define the availability of resources to manage e-waste. Decisions to dispose a computer depend on international factors such as the price of new computers, but also on regional factors such as the cost to repair them. Decisions to store a computer depend on external factors such as markets, but also internal factors such as how users perceive the value of old equipment. E-waste collection depends on the value of e-waste, but also on costs to collect and extract value from them. The main implication is that a general policy base on how E-waste is managed at a big city might not be the most efficient for a small one. More over combining strengths from different cities might overcome respective weaknesses and create new opportunities; this integration can be stimulated by designing policies that consider diversity

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012