Matching Items (21)

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Six Sigma Scrap Reduction in Water Bottle Manufacturing

Description

Upon investigating the current state of the high scrap problem at Niagara Bottling's Phoenix manufacturing facility, it was found that 49% of the scrap was being generated at the bottling

Upon investigating the current state of the high scrap problem at Niagara Bottling's Phoenix manufacturing facility, it was found that 49% of the scrap was being generated at the bottling lines in the form of plastic bottles, and 39% of scrap took the form of preforms accumulated at either the bottling lines or the injection molding machines. The scope of this project includes all forms of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), but the large accumulation of scrap in these areas suggests a primary focus on the bottling lines and the injection molding machines. Further analysis of the bottling lines found that the filler at each line as well as the blower on line X1 were the biggest contributors to the scrap accumulation problem. Each of these machines was seeing over 0.4% of bottles rejected at the visual inspection units. Due to the underlying status and quality issues of the injection molding machines that were beyond the scope of this project, this process was only investigated for solutions involving the overall processes and people. Based on the data and process flow analysis there were several solutions proposed including a root-cause analysis of the highest faulting machines, the repair of the injection molding overhead conveyor systems, the creation of a low waste environment, and the implementation a scrap tracking and analysis process. Based on the current high variability in the scrap experience across all machines, it is recommended that Niagara Phoenix pursue the scrap tracking and analysis alternative. After the implementing the scrap tracking and analysis process, the initial results were encouraging and could potentially warrant the investment in a software platform that could automate the collection of data necessary for this process. Based on the initial results of the manual collection and analysis process, each individual line show signs of potential reduction in the scrap rate of over 50%. According to this improvement, purchasing the software platform would see a payoff period of only 36 days.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Foundry Opportunities

Description

Company X is one of the world's largest semiconductor companies in the world, having a current market capitalization of 177.44 Billion USD, an enterprise value of 173.6 Billion USD, and

Company X is one of the world's largest semiconductor companies in the world, having a current market capitalization of 177.44 Billion USD, an enterprise value of 173.6 Billion USD, and generated 52.7 billion USD in revenue in fiscal year 2013. Recently, Company X has been looking to expand its Foundry business. The Foundry business in the semiconductor business is the actual process of making the chips. This process can be approached in several different ways by companies who need their chips built. A company, like TSMC, can be considered a pure-play company and only makes chips for other companies. A fabless company, like Apple, creates its own chip design and then allows another company to build them. It also uses other chip designs for its products, but outsources the building to another company. Lastly, the integrated device manufacturing companies like Samsung or Company X both design and build the chip. The foundry industry is a rather novel market for Company X because it owns less than 1 percent of the market. However, the industry itself is rather large, generating a total of 40 billion dollars in revenue annually, with expectations to have increasing year over year growth into the foreseeable future. The industry is fairly concentrated with TSMC being the top competitor, owning roughly 50 percent of the market with Samsung and Global Foundries lagging behind as notable competitors. It is a young industry and there is potential opportunity for companies that want to get into the business. For Company X, it is not only another market to get into, but also an added business segment to supplant their business segments that are forecasted to do poorly in the near future. This thesis will analyze the financial opportunity for Company X in the foundry space. Our final product is a series of P&L's which illustrate our findings. The results of our analysis were presented and defended in front of a panel of Company X managers and executives.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Benefits and Application of Statistical Process Control in a Manufacturing Environment

Description

Statistical process control (SPC) is an important quality application that is used throughout industry and is composed of control charts. Most often, it is applied in the final stages of

Statistical process control (SPC) is an important quality application that is used throughout industry and is composed of control charts. Most often, it is applied in the final stages of product manufacturing. However it would be beneficial to apply SPC throughout all stages of the manufacturing process such as the beginning stages. This report explores the fundamentals of SPC, applicable programs, important aspects of implementation, and specific examples of where SPC was beneficial. Important programs for SPC are general statistical software such as JMP and Minitab, and some programs are made specifically for SPC such as SPACE: statistical process and control environment. Advanced programs like SPACE are beneficial because they can easily assist with creating control charts and setting up rules, alarms and notifications, and reaction mechanisms. After the charts are set up it is important to apply rules to the charts to see when a system is running off target which indicates the need to troubleshoot and investigate. This makes the notification part an integral aspect as well because attention and awareness must be brought to out of control situations. The next important aspect is ensuring there is a reaction mechanism or plan on what to do in the event of an out of control situation and what to do to get the system running back on target. Setting up an SPC system takes time and practice and requires a lot of collaboration with experts who know more about the system or the quality side. Some of the more difficult parts of implementation is getting everyone on board and creating trainings and getting the appropriate personnel trained.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Quantitative Study on the Effects of Operating Conditions on Heat Transfer in a Rotary Drum

Description

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, cement, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, cement, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model because the particulate behavior is governed by the process conditions such as particle size, particle size distribution, shape, composition, and operating parameters, such as fill level and rotation rate. More research on heat transfer in rotary drums will increase operating efficiency, leading to tremendous energy savings on a global scale. This study investigates the effects of drum fill level and rotation rate on the steady-state average particle bed temperature. 3 mm silica beads and a stainless steel rotary drum were used at fill levels ranging from 10 \u2014 25 % and rotation rates from 2 \u2014 10 rpm. Four heat guns were used to heat the system via conduction and convection, and an infrared camera was used to record temperature data. A three-level, two-factor, full-factorial design of experiments was employed to determine the effects of each factor on the steady-state average bed temperature. Low fill level and high rotation rate resulted in higher steady-state average bed temperatures. A quantitative model showed that rotation rate had a larger impact on the steady-state bed temperature than fill level.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Examining the Decline of the Automotive Industry

Description

The U.S. Automobile industry was once the crown jewel of America's industrial empire, nothing symbolized American industrial might like the auto plants of Detroit and the millions of cars it

The U.S. Automobile industry was once the crown jewel of America's industrial empire, nothing symbolized American industrial might like the auto plants of Detroit and the millions of cars it put on the road. However, after a spectacular rise in power and wealth after the Second World War, the Big 3 of the automotive industry, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler, have declined to the point of needing a government bailout to continue operation. This paper examines this decline by examining two narratives that describe its fall, and examines the theoretical and empirical evidence for both stories.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Ultrasound Based Predictive Maintenance

Description

The basis of this project was to analyze the potential cost savings derived from the implementation of an ultrasonic flaw detector for gas pipes in factories. The group began by

The basis of this project was to analyze the potential cost savings derived from the implementation of an ultrasonic flaw detector for gas pipes in factories. The group began by researching the market of the Industrial Internet of Things. IIoT is a very attractive market for investment, as connected technologies are become both more advanced and more affordable. Factory automation also saves costs of human capital, maintenance, and bad product cost as well as safety. After doing this preliminary research, the group continued by identifying potential solutions to current shortcomings of the manufacturing status quo. After narrowing down the options, the ultrasonic flaw detector appeared to have the highest potential for success in Company X's factories. The group began doing research on what physical components would go into this solution. They found pricing for all of the various parts of such a device as well as estimated labor, maintenance, and implementation costs. After estimating these costs, the team began the construction of a detailed financial model to generate the hypothetical net present value of such a tool. After presenting two times to a panel of Company X employees, the group decided to focus only on cost savings for Company X, and not the potential revenues of selling the whole solution. They ran a sensitivity analysis on all of the factors that contributed to the NPV of the project, and discovered that the estimated percentage of scrapped product resulting from gas leaks and the percentage of gas lost to leaks contributed the most to the NPV.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Engineering Lean, Packaged Energy Systems for Rapid, Economical Deployment and Distributed Generation

Description

The following document addresses two grand challenges posed to engineers: to make solar energy economically viable and to restore and improve urban infrastructure. Design solutions to these problems consist of

The following document addresses two grand challenges posed to engineers: to make solar energy economically viable and to restore and improve urban infrastructure. Design solutions to these problems consist of the preliminary designs of two energy systems: a Packaged Photovoltaic (PPV) energy system and a natural gas based Modular Micro Combined Cycle (MMCC) with 3D renderings. Defining requirements and problem-solving approach methodology for generating complex design solutions required iterative design and a thorough understanding of industry practices and market trends. This paper briefly discusses design specifics; however, the major emphasis is on aspects pertaining to economical manufacture, deployment, and subsequent suitability to address the aforementioned challenges. The selection of these systems is based on the steady reduction of PV installation costs in recent years (average among utility, commercial, and residential down 27% from Q4 2012 to Q4 2013) and the dramatic decline in natural gas prices to $5.61 per thousand cubic feet. In addition, a large number of utility scale coal-based power plants will be retired in 2014, many due to progressive emission criteria, creating a demand for additional power systems to offset the capacity loss and to increase generating capacity in order to facilitate the ever-expanding world population. The proposed energy systems are not designed to provide power to the masses through a central location. Rather, they are intended to provide economical, reliable, and high quality power to remote locations and decentralized power to community-based grids. These energy systems are designed as a means of transforming and supporting the current infrastructure through distributed electricity generation.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

Quality versus Quantity and the Role of the Designer in the Manufacturing Process

Description

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine line between a quality product and its counterpart- the quantity product. Who is responsible for maintaining this balance? How can we ensure that the responsible parties are aware of how something will be produced? Designers must be educated in manufacturing processes so that they can act as a quality control buffer and make informed decisions about the product specified. The responsibility of maintaining a balance between quality and quantity (or cost) is a joint one. In some cases, it may fall on the craftsman, who pushes out more product in order to compete in the market today. In others, it may be on the manufacturer, who uses particular methods of building in order to ensure a quality product. However, in most scenarios, furniture is produced to spec, per the intent of a designer. Whether the craftsman or the manufacturer makes the product, some sort of design minded person is behind the order and has the final say on how a piece that they have commissioned will look. A purchase order is issued to a manufacturer or craftsman based on a provided quote. Shop drawings are reviewed by a designer to ensure that the proper materials are used, the proper dimensions are met, and that the aesthetic of the piece matches the designer's vision. In recognizing that a portion of responsibility for the manufacture of product falls onto the designer, who submits a specification to a manufacturer, and approves or denies shop drawings, we can recognize a missing piece of their fundamental education. Newly graduated designers lack basic knowledge about the way things that are used every day are built, how they want them built, and what materials are used to build them. Extensive engineering and labor processes are required to fabricate products; processes that a designer may know nothing about, thereby forfeiting their involvement in quality control. This first section of this paper will strive to address issues of quality versus quantity, and the role of the designer in maintaining a balance between the two. In addition, it will focus on implementing methods to educate designers on manufacturing techniques, essentially creating a quality control mechanism in terms of furniture specification. The second section will consist of a developing course outline addressing the basic knowledge and application of manufacturing techniques for interior designers.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Prioritizing Projects on Time and Cost Savings for a more Efficient Manufacturing Process of a Semiconductor Company

Description

Over the course of six months, we have worked in partnership with Arizona State University and a leading producer of semiconductor chips in the United States market (referred to as

Over the course of six months, we have worked in partnership with Arizona State University and a leading producer of semiconductor chips in the United States market (referred to as the "Company"), lending our skills in finance, statistics, model building, and external insight. We attempt to design models that help predict how much time it takes to implement a cost-saving project. These projects had previously been considered only on the merit of cost savings, but with an added dimension of time, we hope to forecast time according to a number of variables. With such a forecast, we can then apply it to an expense project prioritization model which relates time and cost savings together, compares many different projects simultaneously, and returns a series of present value calculations over different ranges of time. The goal is twofold: assist with an accurate prediction of a project's time to implementation, and provide a basis to compare different projects based on their present values, ultimately helping to reduce the Company's manufacturing costs and improve gross margins. We believe this approach, and the research found toward this goal, is most valuable for the Company. Two coaches from the Company have provided assistance and clarified our questions when necessary throughout our research. In this paper, we begin by defining the problem, setting an objective, and establishing a checklist to monitor our progress. Next, our attention shifts to the data: making observations, trimming the dataset, framing and scoping the variables to be used for the analysis portion of the paper. Before creating a hypothesis, we perform a preliminary statistical analysis of certain individual variables to enrich our variable selection process. After the hypothesis, we run multiple linear regressions with project duration as the dependent variable. After regression analysis and a test for robustness, we shift our focus to an intuitive model based on rules of thumb. We relate these models to an expense project prioritization tool developed using Microsoft Excel software. Our deliverables to the Company come in the form of (1) a rules of thumb intuitive model and (2) an expense project prioritization tool.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Feuding Fathers: The Competing Economic Visions of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson

Description

If one were to go to Virginia today and visit Monticello, the former home of Thomas Jefferson, they would find a building that resembles a museum more so than a

If one were to go to Virginia today and visit Monticello, the former home of Thomas Jefferson, they would find a building that resembles a museum more so than a home. Inside are paintings, maps, sculptures and even the antlers of many great beasts. But the first thing that will come to a visitor's sight aren’t these wonders, but rather the busts of two men that glare at each other at the entrance of the home. One stands on a pedestal, large and draped in cloth, the other a simple marble statue of a younger man. The former statue depicts Monticello’s owner and the latter is of the first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton . One may find this curious, as the two didn’t have a friendship and were often thought of as the cause for the United States becoming a two-party system, due to their disagreements. For Thomas Jefferson the placement of these busts seemed natural as it put him into eternal combat with a man he considered his main political rival.
These two men could not have had more different upbringings; Thomas Jefferson was born to a wealthy family that owned land and slaves, whereas Alexander Hamilton was born on a Caribbean island in poverty, only to be orphaned early on in his life . Despite these differences both men found a common goal in fighting for independence for the American colonies. Jefferson would do so as a diplomat and author of the Declaration of Independence, Hamilton would be a patriot through being a soldier and assistant to General George Washington. Once the war was over, the two continued their service to the country and would find themselves as the first heads of the United States’ cabinet departments. By being in Washington’s cabinet, the two came in conflict with one another frequently on the policy of the time such as the country’s neutrality in foreign affairs. No issue put them more in conflict than their stances on the country’s economic state.

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Date Created
  • 2019-12