Matching Items (8)

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Using an Open-Source Solution to Implement a Drone Cyber-Physical System

Description

The goal of this project is to use an open-source solution to implement a drone Cyber-Physical System that can fly autonomously and accurately. The proof-of-concept to analyze the drone's flight

The goal of this project is to use an open-source solution to implement a drone Cyber-Physical System that can fly autonomously and accurately. The proof-of-concept to analyze the drone's flight capabilities is to fly in a pattern corresponding to the outline of an image, a process that requires both stability and precision to accurately depict the image. In this project, we found that building a Cyber-Physical System is difficult because of the tedious and complex nature of designing and testing the hardware and software solutions of this system. Furthermore, we reflect on the difficulties that arose from using open-source hardware and software.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Collision of News and Technology, Chaos or Catalyst

Description

The foundations of legacy media, especially the news media, are not as strong as they once were. A digital revolution has changed the operation models for and journalistic organizations are

The foundations of legacy media, especially the news media, are not as strong as they once were. A digital revolution has changed the operation models for and journalistic organizations are trying to find their place in the new market. This project is intended to analyze the effects of new/emerging technologies on the journalism industry. Five different categories of technology will be explored. They are as follows: the semantic web, automation software, data analysis and aggregators, virtual reality and drone journalism. The potential of these technologies will be broken up according to four guidelines, ethical implications, effects on the reportorial process, business impacts and changes to the consumer experience. Upon my examination, it is apparent that no single technology will offer the journalism industry the remedy it has been searching for. Some combination of emerging technologies however, may form the basis for the next generation of news. Findings are presented on a website that features video, visuals, linked content, and original graphics. Website found at http://www.explorenewstech.com/

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

The Rise of Drones: A Documentary

Description

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, more commonly referred to as drones, have been a hot subject for the past few years. In the news, stories about drones cause the public alarm because

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, more commonly referred to as drones, have been a hot subject for the past few years. In the news, stories about drones cause the public alarm because of their seemingly increasing use. Problems have arisen with drones congesting airspace where manned aircraft fly, posing a huge threat to pilots and passengers of those aircraft. They have also caused concern of the public in matters of privacy. Drones are a go-anywhere and see-anything type of tool. They go where manned aircraft cannot, and where humans on the ground cannot. This video takes an in depth look at the issue of increasing civilian drone use, new regulations on users, categorizing types of drones, and possible solutions to the problems. Throughout the video, there will be three interviews. These interviews will be with experts in the field. The first person is Dr. Sarah Nilsson, Esq. She is a lawyer in drone law with her own practice. She has her PhD, CFI, and CFII as well as professional flying experience. The second person is Mr. Chris Andres. He is the Airport Administrator of Chandler Municipal Airport and offers a unique perspective on drones from an airport management standpoint. Lastly, the third person interviewed is a salesman at Viper Hobbies located in Mesa, AZ. He offers a perspective of drone use from the retail side, and also insight in FAA requirements of retailers and how retailers might offer education on regulation to the public.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Drone for Search and Rescue: Improving Outcomes When Seconds Count

Description

As technology and legislation advances, small unmanned aerial systems (SUAS), better known as drones, have begun to become an integral part of emergency services. Large departments such as the New

As technology and legislation advances, small unmanned aerial systems (SUAS), better known as drones, have begun to become an integral part of emergency services. Large departments such as the New York City fire department and the National Park Service have implemented very successful programs. However, many departments are still not using them despite this uptick in usage. In order to improve accessibility of this technology, I set out to perform field research and develop a series of public service announcement videos combined with standard operating procedures (SOPs) in order to create a model that can help departments start their own SUAS programs. Through hours of fieldwork, I was able to develop policies and procedures that I then laid out in various videos and SOPs, all with the intention of improving accessibility to this technology. The benefits of SUAS are numerous and can greatly improve patient outcomes as well as improve first responder safety. Through my research, I created a strong foundation for any department no matter the size or location to be able to start their own program with relative ease.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Morality as causality: explaining public opinion on US government drone strikes

Description

ABSTRACT

Although the US government has been using remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), more commonly referred to as drones, to conduct military strikes against terrorists and insurgents

ABSTRACT

Although the US government has been using remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), more commonly referred to as drones, to conduct military strikes against terrorists and insurgents since at least 2001, only around 2011 did media outlets and polling organizations began assessing the attitudes of Americans towards the use of drones as a weapon of war. Initially, public support for drone strikes was robust with nearly 70 percent of Americans expressing approval. As the discussion of drone strikes intensified however, public support declined over 10 percentage points.

Only a handful of studies have examined public opinion and drone strikes, and all have focused exclusively on explaining support. This study seeks to fill this gap in the literature and explain opposition to drone strikes. The primary argument put forth in this dissertation is that people’s beliefs determine their opinions, and their morality determines their beliefs. Although independent opinion formation is often considered a cognitive process, I argue that, at least in the case of drone strikes, the opinion formation process is largely an affective one.

By examining media coverage and elite discourse surrounding drone strikes, I isolate three narratives which I believe communicate certain messages to the public regarding drone strikes. I argue that the messages produced by elite discourse and disseminated by the media to the public are only influential on opinion formation once they have been converted to beliefs. I further argue that conversion of message to belief is largely dependent on individual moral attitudes.

To test my arguments, I conduct a survey-experiment using subjects recruited from Arizona State University’s School of Politics and Global Studies student subject pool. My research findings lead to two key conclusions. First, opposition to drone strikes is largely the product of the belief(s) that drone strikes are not necessary for protecting the United States from terrorist attack, and that drone strikes kill more civilians than do strikes from conventional aircraft. Second, whether an individual expresses support or opposition to drone strikes, moral attitudes are a relatively good predictor of both beliefs and disposition.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Exploratory Study of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Building Inspections: A Roofing Inspection Case Study

Description

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have become readily available for both the average consumer and professional due to decreases in price and increases in technological capabilities. This work ventured to explore

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have become readily available for both the average consumer and professional due to decreases in price and increases in technological capabilities. This work ventured to explore the feasible use of UAV-technology in the area of roof analysis for facilities management purposes and contrast it to traditional techniques of inspection. An underlying goal of this work was two-fold. First, it was to calculate the upfront cost of investing in appropriate UAV equipment and training for a typical staff member to become proficient at doing such maintenance work in the practice of actual roof inspections on a sample set of roofs. Secondly, it was to compare the value of using this UAV method of investigation to traditional practices of inspecting roofs manually by personally viewing and walking roofs. The two methods for inspecting roofs were compared using various metrics, including time, cost, value, safety, and other relevant measurables. In addition to the study goals, this research was able to identify specific benefits and hazards for both methods of inspection through empirical trials. These points illustrate the study as Lessons Learned from the experience, which may be of interest to those Facilities Managers who are considering investing resources in UAV training and equipment for industrial purposes. Overall, this study helps to identify the utility of UAV technology in a well-established professional field in a way that has not been previously conducted in academia.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Policy Innovation for an Uncertain Future: Regulating Drone Use in Southern California Cities

Description

Over the past six years, the use of drones for recreational and commercial purposes has increased dramatically. There are currently over one million registered drones in the United States, and

Over the past six years, the use of drones for recreational and commercial purposes has increased dramatically. There are currently over one million registered drones in the United States, and this number is expected to increase in the foreseeable future. For now, drones are a local phenomenon. The operational limitations prevent them from long range activity and federal policies prevent them from operating beyond the visual line of sight of the controller. The localized nature of drone operation makes them a particularly salient issue at the local regulatory level. At this level, cities must contend with the uncertainty of drone operation and a complex regulatory environment. Within a single metropolitan region, there are cities that may attempt to restrict the use of drones through various local ordinances while neighboring cities may have not even considered, let alone adopted, any type of regulation. The reasons behind these policy choices are not clear.

In an effort to understand the factors involved in the decisions to adopt a local drone use policy, this dissertation leverages qualitative methods to analyze the policy process leading to local decisions. The study capitalizes on rich contextual data gathered from a variety of sources for select cities in Orange and Los Angeles Counties. Specifically, this study builds a conceptual framework from policy innovation literature and applies it in the form of content analysis. This initial effort is used to identify the catalysts for policy discussion and the specific innovation mechanisms that support or detract from the decision to adopt a local drone use ordinance. Then, qualitative comparative analysis is used to determine which configuration of factors, identified during the content analysis, contribute to the causal path of policy adoption. Among other things, the results highlight the role that uncertainty plays in the policy process. Cities that adopt a drone use ordinance have low levels of uncertainty, high numbers of registered drone users, and at least two neighboring cities that also have drone use policies. This dissertation makes a modest contribution to policy innovation research, highlights how a configurational analysis technique can be applied to policy adoption decisions, and contains several recommendations for regulating drone use at the local level.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Exploring the Effects of Experience on Drone Piloting

Description

The current study aims to explore factors affecting trust in human-drone collaboration. A current gap exists in research surrounding civilian drone use and the role of trust in human-drone interaction

The current study aims to explore factors affecting trust in human-drone collaboration. A current gap exists in research surrounding civilian drone use and the role of trust in human-drone interaction and collaboration. Specifically, existing research lacks an explanation of the relationship between drone pilot experience, trust, and trust-related behaviors as well as other factors. Using two dimensions of trust in human-automation team—purpose and performance—the effects of experience on drone design and trust is studied to explore factors that may contribute to such a model. An online survey was conducted to examine civilian drone operators’ experience, familiarity, expertise, and trust in commercially available drones. It was predicted that factors of prior experience (familiarity, self-reported expertise) would have a significant effect on trust in drones. The choice to use or exclude the drone propellers in a search-and-identify scenario, paired with the pilots’ experience with drones, would further confirm the relevance of the trust dimensions of purpose versus performance in the human-drone relationship. If the pilot has a positive sense of purpose and benevolence with the drone, the pilot trusts the drone has a positive intent towards them and the task. If the pilot has trust in the performance of the drone, they ascertain that the drone has the skill to do the task. The researcher found no significant differences between mean trust scores across levels of familiarity, but did find some interaction between self-report expertise, familiarity, and trust. Future research should further explore more concrete measures of situational participant factors such as self-confidence and expertise to understand their role in civilian pilots’ trust in their drone.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019