Matching Items (8)

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No Longer a Victim, But a Survivor

Description

Domestic violence comes in a variety of forms along with multiple terms and definitions. Domestic violence can seep into a relationship like a plague if a young, adolescent girl is

Domestic violence comes in a variety of forms along with multiple terms and definitions. Domestic violence can seep into a relationship like a plague if a young, adolescent girl is not aware of the signs. Unfortunately, many young girls in abusive relationships are unaware of how to prevent the abusive behavior from continuing since the girls are overall unaware of the warning signs. One study of 146 teenage girls in which 44% of the girls chose to respond passively when given a hypothetical scenario of an abusive event (Murphy and Smith 13). Through novels and media, young girls are led to believe that it is appropriate to be treated poorly by young boys. One study of eight young adult novels was conducted and demonstrated just how teen romance novels can negatively influence a young girl's perception of Teen Dating Violence (Storer and Strohl 7). As the young girls get older, the idea that abuse is acceptable becomes solidified in their heads. Many women face multiple forms of abuse, such as more than half of 1,401 women in a study by Coker et al. (2000) were experiencing some form of abuse (553). Specifically, a National Violence Against Women Survey was conducted and 59% of the victims, who were stalked by current partners, were at a higher risk to experience psychological abuse by their assailant (Tjaden and Thoennes "Stalking" 6,11). The abuse often leads to the victim having mental health problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Golding 126). Women in abusive relationships have a greater chance of having a poorer quality of life (Tollestrup et al. 431). Nevertheless, leaving an abusive relationship is very difficult to do since many women have a bias that their risk is not as high as another woman who is in the same predicament (Martin et al. 109). To make matters worse, half of all women who do leave end up returning to their abusive partner (Strube "Decision" 238). It has been discovered that if there are few resources available to the victim, she will stay with her abusive partner (Gelles 667). Other key factors that play an important role in if the victim stays, include economic issues and love for the abuser (Strube and Barbour "Factors" 840), or a lack of support from friends and family (Landenburger 703). Fortunately, 61 of 98 women in a study left their abusive partner, which could have been due to the fact that 57.1% of the 98 women had employment (Strube and Barbour "Decision" 788). Women may also have trouble leaving due to entrapment in which the victim justifies all investments of time and money to make the abuser happy (Strube "Decisions" 241). Entrapment can also be related to learned helplessness in which the victim lacks the motivation to make change (242). While a woman is in the relationship, she may experience the responses to dissatisfaction, which include: exit, voice, loyalty, and neglect (Rusbult et al. "Exit" 1231). In addition, the woman may encounter the four coping styles which are: self-punishing, aggressive, early disengagement, and reluctant mid-life disengagement responses (Pfouts 102). Although the woman may experience these responses, she may have difficulty leaving the abusive relationship since she may think that the consequences of leaving are more detrimental than what they actually are (Strube "Decision" 241). College women are also at risk for being in abusive relationships as 20% to 30% experience abuse (Shorey et al. 187). However, college women have a high rate of leaving the abusive relationship since they may have more resources than a woman who is dependent economically on her abuser (Edwards et al. 2920). College women also experience high levels of revenge rather than forgiveness (Davidson et al. 3217). Fortunately, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Many women experience growth from such a traumatic experience. This growth can be developing strength and healthier relationships in the future (McMillen and Fisher 173). In fact, one study by Richard Tedeschi and Lawrence G. Calhoun (1995) was referred to by Patricia Frazier et al. (2001). The study concluded that 50% to 60% of women across multiple studies experienced growth (1048). In the end, those who forgive will have less anxiety and depression (Thompson et al. 313). In order to alleviate the occurrence of domestic abuse, preventative measures should begin with adolescents. These young girls must first develop skills to be assertive before entering a relationship. Support groups and shelters should be widespread, and stricter laws should be enforced that result in negative consequences for those who break them. Education should include women learning about the warning signs of abuse as well as classes for parents to teach them how domestic violence can impact their teenage children. Health education should also include teaching children about what a healthy relationship should consist of. In addition, many health care providers do not screen women for abuse (Smith et al. 4), which means that medical professionals should screen better for abuse and intervene if necessary. As for law enforcement, they should be better trained in how to be sensitive and deal with women who are being abused. As for me, during my teenage years my significant other abused me. However, I chose to end the cycle. I was young and read many young romance novels, listened to music that portrayed women in a poor light, and thus, fell for the bad boy that I would always hear about in music, or read about in books. I knew very little about relationships, and so I was a perfect target. I knew even less of the warning signs as I was not taught about them in school, and I did not grow up in a household that demonstrated any abuse. That being said, I thought that all people were innately good. My perpetrator, on the other hand, grew up drastically different than I did since he has seen his mother get brutally beaten multiple times by many men who came and went in her life. In the end, I learned to forgive and move on. Today, I choose to share my story to raise awareness of the fact that I am not the only one who is a victim. Domestic violence is growing among the youth, and I would like to put an end to this epidemic by presenting empirical data from studies followed by my own personal story.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Same Bed

Description

Same Bed is a twelve-piece book of poetry that explores the theme of sexual violence. The speaker of the poems is processing the trauma surrounding her rape which leads her

Same Bed is a twelve-piece book of poetry that explores the theme of sexual violence. The speaker of the poems is processing the trauma surrounding her rape which leads her to explore her own family's dynamics regarding gender, power, and acknowledgment of sexuality. The speaker also observes the broader issue of how society reacts to rape and the effects that can have on a survivor of sexual violence. In the peak of the manuscript, the speaker pieces together part of her own police report, pinning her own voice and perspective against her rapists.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Gray Area

Description

Gray Area is a solo exhibition of photography in conclusion to Haylee Schiavo's studies at Arizona State University. Twenty-six images were displayed at the Step Gallery in Phoenix, and Schiavo

Gray Area is a solo exhibition of photography in conclusion to Haylee Schiavo's studies at Arizona State University. Twenty-six images were displayed at the Step Gallery in Phoenix, and Schiavo continues to photograph for this project. The show combines her interests in two disciplines, Photography as well as Family and Human Development. She photographed a woman who self identifies as being an abuse survivor. The images display the specificity of this woman's story, but also represent the harsh realities of abuse that is highly prevalent in today's society. Her work may be found online at hayleeschiavo.com.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Intracranial Self-Stimulation and the Abuse Potential of the Synthetic Cathinones: Methylone and α-PVP

Description

In recent years the abuse of synthetic cathinones, "Bath Salts," has increased. The purpose of this study was to analyze two synthetic cathinones, methylone and α-pvp, for hedonic properties or

In recent years the abuse of synthetic cathinones, "Bath Salts," has increased. The purpose of this study was to analyze two synthetic cathinones, methylone and α-pvp, for hedonic properties or the potential to be abused. This was tested using an intracranial self-stimulation paradigm, a robust measurement for reward. It was found methylone resulted in an abuse potential similar to MDMA, ecstasy, abuse. Moreover, the results for α-pvp showed a high liability for abuse.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Stress-reducing Interventions During Pregnancy

Description

Abstract Stress-reducing Interventions During Pregnancy Sandy Morales The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of stress-reducing interventions on birth outcomes of abused and non-abused pregnant women and

Abstract Stress-reducing Interventions During Pregnancy Sandy Morales The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of stress-reducing interventions on birth outcomes of abused and non-abused pregnant women and to synthesize the available evidence with recommendations for childbirth educators to implement during prenatal care. Electronic searches were conducted in the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Insurance Literature (CINAHL) and PubMed for interventions during pregnancy. Key word searches were conducted using the terms stress, pregnancy, depression, intervention, abuse, IPV, and stress management. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria, focusing on interventions for: (a) women at risk for or currently in abusive relationships (n=4); and, (b) stress reduction for nonspecific life stress (n=5). Studies were categorized by abused and non-abused pregnant women. Individual interventions were the most common interventions for abused pregnant women. Intervention outcomes included decreased stress/anxiety levels, decreased rates of major depression, reduced recurrence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), increased provider-patient IPV discussion, and increased self-esteem. A limited amount of data supports the efficacy of interventions designed for stress during pregnancy or for pregnant women who have experienced or currently face stress from abuse. More research on stress during pregnancy, particularly stress from abusive situations, is need before interventions can conclusively be determined as beneficial for abused, pregnant women.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012-05

Pretrial Detainee Abuse

Description

PTD Abuse Abstract
In this project I hope to educate people in the area of pre-trial detainee abuse. I define the terms, explain the problems, give information on

PTD Abuse Abstract
In this project I hope to educate people in the area of pre-trial detainee abuse. I define the terms, explain the problems, give information on how the issue has evolved in recent decades. I explain my interest in the issue and give background of my involvement. There is special focus on New York City, specifically Rikers Island and the Stop and Frisk program engaged in by police there. There is also focus on Maricopa County and Joe Arpaio due to the incredible amount of abuse suffered by people at the hands of Maricopa County Sheriff’s jail personnel over twenty four years of Arpaio’s tenure. There is a section on mental illness and disabilities whose sufferers are especially susceptible to abuse. I report on law enforcement abuses and the evolution of court decisions that allow officers more opportunity for abuse and the ability to deceive people they are investigating. There is an Innocence Project report that details law enforcement expanding the ability to deceive people they are investigating, to lying to the courts and during testimony. My hope is to educate more people to the problems I describe. I also report on changes being made to alleviate the problems.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Substance-exposed newborns in Arizona: an analysis of medically, ethically, and legally appropriate federal and state responses

Description

Intake of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substances such as marijuana and methamphetamine during pregnancy can have significant deleterious effects on a developing fetus and the resulting infant. The existence of

Intake of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substances such as marijuana and methamphetamine during pregnancy can have significant deleterious effects on a developing fetus and the resulting infant. The existence of substance-exposed newborns also has negative impacts on society as a whole; these include financial burdens placed on taxpayers and the additional time and resources required by health care professionals, social workers, and law enforcement authorities to properly care for such infants. Existing literature show a strong correlation between prenatal care and improved birth outcomes, including abstinence from or reduction of prenatal substance abuse. The Health Start Program in the state of Arizona attempts to mitigate the incidence of substance-exposed newborns, among other goals, by employing community health workers who identify high-risk pregnant and postpartum women, inform these women about how to receive prenatal care services, educate them on appropriate prenatal and neonatal care, and provide program and referral services to both pregnant and postpartum women. Community health workers interact directly with women most at-risk for prenatal substance abuse and should be well-versed in the understanding of the complex issues related to substance-exposed newborns. In an attempt to discover, analyze, and compile those complex issues with which community health workers should be knowledgeable, this project explores existing federal regulations regarding substance-exposed newborns, compares Arizona’s regulations to Minnesota’s, Virginia’s, and Washington’s, and analyzes prevailing literature in the field about the various implications associated with screening and reporting substance-exposed newborns to law enforcement authorities. After an intensive literature review, this project concludes that the Health Start Program needs a comprehensive resource document which enumerates federal and select state policies, landmark cases involving substance-abusing pregnant women and the precedence set by each, and recommendations from medical and public health experts. The document should also provide clear guidelines by which each stakeholder should abide and why, and recommend potential best practices the state of Arizona could adopt into law based on other state policies which have proven to be effective.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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The relationship of attitudes about touch with depressive symptoms among women who report abuse

Description

Touch appears to be an important component for understanding psychological and emotional well-being, as well as the formation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships later in life. While research about touch

Touch appears to be an important component for understanding psychological and emotional well-being, as well as the formation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships later in life. While research about touch in relation to these topics is gaining momentum, there is still little evidence on the specific effects and processes that take place when touch is negative or harmful. The current study examined how women who have experienced physical or sexual abuse perceive touch in the context of interpersonal relations and in turn, how these experiences, perceptions and attitudes are related to depressive symptoms. Taking into consideration the significance of interpersonal touch, I speculated that 1) attitudes towards touch would be more negative among women who reported physical or sexual abuse than among women who did not; 2) among women who reported past abuse, increased abuse severity would predict increased current depressive symptoms; and 3) among women who reported past abuse, current attitudes towards touch would mediate the relationship between abuse severity and depressive symptoms. As predicted, results indicated that women who reported physical or sexual abuse had less positive attitudes towards touch than women who did not report any abuse. Echoing prior research, reports of childhood and adult abuse predicted increased depressive symptoms. Finally, for women who reported childhood abuse, Discomfort with Social Touch was a significant partial mediator of depressive symptoms, whereas for women who reported adult abuse, both Desire for More Partner Touch and Discomfort with Social Touch were significant partial mediators of depressive symptoms. Results suggested that negative attitudes towards general social touch, in particular, may play a strong role in mediating depressive symptoms among women who reported abuse.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015