Matching Items (17)

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The First Sin and Its Punishment

Description

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea of sin intrigues me and this thesis is a collaboration of my ideas concerning justice and injustice, science and nature, individual potential and the human spirit. I believe that, sometimes, acts of sin can be beautiful when they represent the rejection of normative standards and do not actively harm others. Sins only assume meaning in the context of existing social norms, and, as can be seen throughout history, these norms are constantly evolving. I also focus on the juxtaposition of beauty and evil in my work, and reference Christianity and other mythologies. I hope that my work offers an exploration of human desires and the subconscious to those who seek it.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2002-05

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Christian Beliefs Surrounding End of Life Care

Description

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This study sought to investigate Christian end of life beliefs and needs. A qualitative study design was used to explore end of life beliefs and needs of members from a non-denominational Christian church who self-declared their Christianity. A 10-item Assessment Tool on end of life needs and beliefs was created by this investigator and used in the study (Appendix 1). A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Notes and audio recordings were taken and later transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis including an open analysis and an axial analysis of the data. The open analysis identified trends and common concepts which were then categorized into broader themes during the axial analysis. Findings included several major themes that described the Christian population's end of life needs and beliefs. The major themes identified included: trust in God, beliefs about necessity of religious practices, lack of fear of death, similarities in religious rituals and practices, and a desire for quality of life. During a statistical analysis, findings revealed that 86% believed that pain and suffering should be treated and prevented. One hundred percent (100%) of the participants reported that their faith helped with their acceptance of death. An additional 64% stated that they did not fear death. The findings in this study can improve religious and cultural awareness for nurses and others in the healthcare field.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Christianity and Social Justice: Resolving Internal Tension, Speaking Spiritual Truths, and Articulating an Ethic for Challenging Times

Description

Social and economic turmoil in the wake of the Great Recession have resurrected longstanding political and social tensions. Jumping on the bandwagon revival of "conservatism" in American politics demonstrated by

Social and economic turmoil in the wake of the Great Recession have resurrected longstanding political and social tensions. Jumping on the bandwagon revival of "conservatism" in American politics demonstrated by sizable Republican gains in the 2010 midterm elections, conservatives in faith-based communities have revived so-called "social issues," particularly seeking to roll back LGBT and reproductive rights. I aim to underscore the internal tensions that exist between policy choices of social and fiscal conservatives. Through a critical reading of the Bible and a comparative discussion about the role of government in modern-day economies, I seek to interrogate the longsstanding assumptions that have connected Scripture, laissez-faire economics, and Republican policies. Finally, acknowledging the multiplicity of perspectives that life experience may bring, I articulate a Christian case for social justice and offer an embodied methodological praxis as a basis for further inquiry.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012-05

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THE GLORY OF LAZARUS: HOW THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF SYRIAN CHRISTIANITY WAS A PRODUCT OF CULTURAL CHANGES IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF WEALTH, POVERTY, AND THE ROLE OF THE CLERGY AS REFLECTED BY THE LIFE AND WORKS OF EPHREM THE SYRIAN.

Description

The transformation of Christianity from a small sect of Judaism into a stabilized and powerful multinational political structure has been the topic of a tremendous amount of research and study

The transformation of Christianity from a small sect of Judaism into a stabilized and powerful multinational political structure has been the topic of a tremendous amount of research and study over the last several hundred years. The question on how, or in what cultural situation was the Christian movement able to grow and stabilize, has been answered in a variety of different ways, by a variety of eminent scholars. In this thesis I apply traditional academic explanations for Christian growth, specifically those of Princeton Historian Peter Brown, to the Syriac-speaking regions of the East during the fourth and fifth centuries. Within this cultural situation, I explore the life and works of the influential Syrian theologian Ephrem the Syrian as a reflection of the concerns of Christians in the East. I provide rich historical information, as well as analysis of Ephrem's many theological concerns. I make use of a myriad of other resources and historical figures relevant to the thesis, and use the vivid picture of Syriac Christianity to answer the fundamental question of how Syriac Christianity grew, and how wealth, poverty, and the changing role of the Christian clergy contributed to this growth. In this investigation, I argue that Syriac Christianity promoted the same radical attitude concerning charity, renunciation of wealth, and the role of the clergy as Mediterranean Christianity according to Brown, but that many cultural and societal impediments faced in Persia prevented the same growth from occurring. The cultural situation faced by Christians in the East was radically different from that of the Mediterranean. This distinction, and all of its implications, is shown to be the reason for the historically underwhelming growth of Christianity during these centuries and beyond.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Why Women of Faith Tend to Stay in Abusive Relationships

Description

Women often feel lost within their church community and are overlooking their own health to blend in with conceptions of a perfect marriage that are brought on through stereotypes. Women

Women often feel lost within their church community and are overlooking their own health to blend in with conceptions of a perfect marriage that are brought on through stereotypes. Women of abuse are believing, even if it's a matter of their personal health, they are not allowed to separate from their husband sin-free. This concept holds many spiritual women from taking a crucial step from leaving a dangerous situation. Finally, gender roles and the concept of male power is granting abusive men the chance to control the lives and beliefs of their wives with little fight from religious leaders. In order to help Christian women fighting a losing battle against rough husbands, changes need to be made. The education of the clergy and faith communities that may be the first step for many women reaching out for help is vital. First, sermons and lectures need to change to place an emphasis on the equality that is preached throughout the Bible. Second, a solution, such as annulment for abusive marriages, needs to be accepted by the Christian church in order to free women of their vows. At last, a wider knowledge of how common this unfortunate scenario is needs to be expressed throughout the Christian Community. Too many women believe that they are alone, and this is causing them to create unrealistic stereotypes about marriage. By addressing these major issues found throughout the Christian faith there is a better chance that women will start to speak up and find the courage to get out.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Christian Ministries and Their Impact on College Student Wellness

Description

College and university students are heavily influenced by their exposure to opportunities, individuals, and belief-systems during their time in school. More specifically, countless students are impacted by campus Christian ministries.

College and university students are heavily influenced by their exposure to opportunities, individuals, and belief-systems during their time in school. More specifically, countless students are impacted by campus Christian ministries. There are 67 registered religious clubs and organizations across Arizona State University's four campuses, and 46 of them identify as Christian. Similar to most faith-based organizations, Christian campus ministries seek to impact the lives of students. This study will take a look at the influence of these ministries at ASU by researching their intersection with another key component of university life: wellness.
The primary research question is, “How does involvement in Christian ministries at ASU relate to the wellness of students?” The study will examine multiple dimensions of wellness: occupational, physical, social, intellectual, spiritual, and emotional. Each component is essential to understanding the health and well-being of an individual, which is why this study will measure wellness levels in each dimension among samples of students at ASU.
The methodology chosen was a short, anonymous survey that 148 ASU students participated in—73 involved in Christian ministries at ASU and 75 not involved. The quantitative component included a wellness assessment using questions from The National Wellness Institute. These wellness scale questions were broken up into 5 randomized sections, each with one question per dimension, for 30 questions total. Each question response was assigned a rating on a 1 to 5 scale, 1 associated with low wellness and 5 high wellness. The qualitative component, comprised of short answer questions, only applied to students who were involved in a Christian ministry. This portion allowed respondents to explain if and how the ministry impacts each dimension of wellness uniquely.
The quantitative results showed some evident differences between students involved in Christian ministries and students not involved. The social and spiritual dimensions concluded much higher levels of wellness for involved students, both statistically significant with p-values of 0.028 and 0.004. Although some of the wellness differences between involved and not involved participants were not statistically significant, there is also notable variation among questions within each dimension. For the qualitative data, most students in Christian ministries said they believe their involvement increases their wellness in all six dimensions. For each dimension, over 75% of participants said that the ministry impacted their well-being. For the social, spiritual, and emotional dimensions, at least 97% of respondents said their ministry involvement impacted their wellness.
In examining the conclusions of the study, one recommendations is to strengthen the partnership between the greater ASU community and Christian ministries by collaborating and combining resources for programming that relates to their common goals and shared values. Additionally, other faith-based organizations at ASU may benefit from replicating this study to observe their unique wellness impact.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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The Effects of Christianity and Hinduism on Environmentalism

Description

This research examined the influence that Christian and Hindu religious beliefs have on environmentalism; specifically, whether beliefs that one would return to this earth after death (i.e., a belief in

This research examined the influence that Christian and Hindu religious beliefs have on environmentalism; specifically, whether beliefs that one would return to this earth after death (i.e., a belief in reincarnation) and how the world might end may explain more positive attitudes toward the environment. Participants were 533 self-identified Christians and Hindus in the United States and India who completed an online survey assessing religiosity, positive attitudes towards environmentalism, afterlife beliefs, and eschatological beliefs. Christians showed significantly lower ratings of environmentalism compared with Hindus. There were also significant negative differences found based on beliefs about heaven, eschatology beliefs, and increased religiosity in Christians, and significant positive differences found based on reincarnation, eschatology beliefs, and increased religiosity in Hindus. Overall, these results suggest that Christians are less likely to have positive attitudes toward environmentalism compared with Hindus, and that beliefs about the afterlife and the end of the world were significant predictors of environmentalist attitudes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Nobody's Angel

Description

Nobody's Angel is a fantasy novel that exposes the grey area between good and evil by dissecting the stereotypes associated with angels and Lucifer. The story explores the depths of

Nobody's Angel is a fantasy novel that exposes the grey area between good and evil by dissecting the stereotypes associated with angels and Lucifer. The story explores the depths of character and how everyone is made up of good and bad parts. Nobody's Angel aims at dissecting the complexity of female sexuality. The story explores what it means to be a woman, what sex means, and if enjoying sex really is amoral. It combats the Christian belief that all women are fallen because of Eve. Our current society developed from Judeo-Christian principles, which created some of the stereotypes and misconceptions that we have today. Nobody's Angel attempts to fight against those ideas.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Efficacy and Effectiveness of Christian Psychotherapeutic Interventions: A Literature Review

Description

Christian psychotherapy appears to be useful especially for Christian clients seeking therapy, and is a growing preference among this population. Thus, the need for research on the efficacy and effectiveness

Christian psychotherapy appears to be useful especially for Christian clients seeking therapy, and is a growing preference among this population. Thus, the need for research on the efficacy and effectiveness of Christian interventions must be recognized. This study reviews 13 effectiveness and 21 efficacy studies of Christian psychotherapeutic interventions in various areas of psychotherapy. The majority of effectiveness and efficacy studies were shown to give positive outcomes for Christian psychotherapy, and overall, Christian psychotherapy is promising as an effective alternative to secular therapy. The need for further research in most areas is discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Mithraic Mysteries: A Study of the Rise and Fall of Mithraism in the Roman Empire

Description

One of Ancient Rome's most intriguing pagan religions is that of the mysterious cult of Mithras: the celebration of an ancient Indo-Iranian god, who gained an enormous amount of popularity

One of Ancient Rome's most intriguing pagan religions is that of the mysterious cult of Mithras: the celebration of an ancient Indo-Iranian god, who gained an enormous amount of popularity during the first several centuries of the Common Era. Mithraism, as the cult has been commonly termed, was a mystery religion, one whose nature and teachings remain somewhat secretive today, since the cult left no written works. Mithraism provides a particularly interesting point of view regarding the Roman Empire, since the cult began around the same time that Christianity did, but was entirely forgotten just over 400 years later. In analyzing why one religion succeeded while the other failed, this paper examines beliefs such as astrology, Zoroastrianism, monotheism, and fatalism within the context of life in the Roman Empire.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05