Matching Items (13)

Indoor Cycling: Industry Trends and Small Business Planning

Description

A market analysis on the boutique fitness industry, as well as financial plans and logistical planning of creating a unique indoor cycling studio in the greater Scottsdale area. Through competitive,

A market analysis on the boutique fitness industry, as well as financial plans and logistical planning of creating a unique indoor cycling studio in the greater Scottsdale area. Through competitive, financial, and technological analyses one is able to better understand the breadth and scope of the growing fitness industry as well as see the potential risks and benefits in opening a small business in this arena.
Health and wellness can be found all throughout the market nowadays. Whether it be from the food people eat or the money people spend on self-care, this trend has created a significant niche in today’s market. Create Cycle is the next big player to be stepping into the mayhem that is the health and wellness industry. Create Cycle is a new indoor cycling experience located in Scottsdale, Arizona. Its mission: to provide people with an unforgettably positive fitness experience where each and every person feels empowered to create love for themselves through state-of-the-art technology. With the fitness industry is quickly growing, and it is imperative for Create Cycle to differentiate itself within the Scottsdale market. Create Cycle will be, in theory, based around an entire experience. The classes will consist of some of the best talent and training one can find in the valley. This will be done through a specific hiring process and strategic organizational structure. The goal is to let experiences in class lead to a strong community following, where Create Cycle becomes the place to be. Its vision: to one day break down the notions of exercising solely for physical appearance but rather for one’s own happiness and for those around them in a larger frame of mind.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

135862-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) Improves Mobility in Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on the lower body strength and aerobic capacity in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Six

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on the lower body strength and aerobic capacity in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Six participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions: 1) Voluntary Cycling (VC), where participants cycled at their self-selected pedaling rate and 2) Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT), where the participants' voluntary pedaling rates were augmented by 35% with a motor. In each intervention, the participant completed three, 30-minute cycling sessions each week for a total of eight weeks. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) was used to evaluate the distance each participant was able to complete in six minutes before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in the distance and velocity of the participants after the intervention with a greater mean improvement for participants in the ACT group than VC when analyzing total score and t-score. Future research will include a greater sample size and control group to reach significant results as well as try and reveal the mechanisms involved in these physical health improvements found after an acute bout of assisted cycling in adults with DS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

Zen and the Art of Bicycle Maintenance: An Examination of Bicycle Touring

Description

A bicycle tour is an unusual thing, one that often defies the expectations of the first-time touring cyclist. In this report, the experience of touring cycling is examined in two

A bicycle tour is an unusual thing, one that often defies the expectations of the first-time touring cyclist. In this report, the experience of touring cycling is examined in two parts: a narrative documenting the author's tour down the Pacific Coast, and a reflective work that examines the journey and the major themes which persist throughout. In examining the trip, two major dichotomies arose as themes. The first major dichotomy is found in the expectation of a solitary experience for one who is touring solo. In reality, tours are often built on the goodwill of others in the cycling community. On this particular tour, a website called Warmshowers was central to this point. By offering lodging to tired touring cyclists who would otherwise camp alone, this website serves to bring the cycling community together, and allows for connections that would otherwise never exist to be formed. However, it is true that much of a solo tour is, in fact, spent in solitude. This allows a cyclist long periods for self-reflection and meditation, an opportunity to strengthen one's connection with oneself and the natural world around them. The second is a contrast between the planning that goes into embarking on a long trip and the entropy and randomness that inevitably causes the experience to wildly differ from said plan. When the unexpected occurs, there are two options: to reject the unknown and cling to the framework one sets out for themselves, or to embrace the unexpected and see where it takes you. Often, diverting from the plan can allow for new and exciting experiences. However, there is also value to the framework and stability afforded by adhering to a plan. Through these experiences and more, a bicycle tour changes the way one looks at the world.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133331-Thumbnail Image.png

An Observational Study of the Motivation of Long Distance Cyclists During Faith Based Charity Ride

Description

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women:

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists' participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups based on self-reported experience levels, and it was shown that across all types of experience levels, both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators were expressed but with greater emphasis on intrinsic factors. The most commonly indicated intrinsic motivation subcategories were life meaning, personal goal achievement, and affiliation, with affiliation being recognized by every individual. The most commonly indicated extrinsic subcategories were competition, recognition, health orientation, and weight concern. Though each rider's story was signature to the individual, the very specific religious background and philanthropic mission of the Fuller Center Bike Adventure weighed heavily into each individual's motivation alongside the classified intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therefore, this research offered valuable data about motivation of recreational cyclists but future studies should focus on a less specific population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

148321-Thumbnail Image.png

The Effects of Acute Resistance Training (RT) and Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) on Inhibitory Control in Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on inhibitory control in adults with Down Syndrome (DS). Thirteen participants attended four sessions: a baseline assessment, an Assisted Cycling

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on inhibitory control in adults with Down Syndrome (DS). Thirteen participants attended four sessions: a baseline assessment, an Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) session, a Resistance Training (RT) session, and a session of No Training (NT). In the baseline assessment, 1-repetition max (1RM) measurements and voluntary pedal rate measurements were taken. In the resistance training session, the leg press, chest press, seated row, leg curl, shoulder press, and latissimus pulldown were performed. In the cycling intervention, the participant completed 30 minutes of cycling. The Erikson Flanker task was administered prior to each session (i.e., pretest) and after the intervention (i.e., post-test). The results were somewhat consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition time improved more following RT and ACT than NT. there was also a significant difference between ACT and NT. Additionally, it was hypothesized that all measures would improve following each acute exercise intervention, but the most significant improvements were seen following ACT. In conclusion, an acute session of ACT demonstrated a significant trend towards improvements in inhibitory control in adults with DS which we interpreted using a model of neural changes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

136476-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Therapy Improves Functional Exercise Capacity in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examined the effect of an 8-week exercise intervention on functional exercise capacity in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups:

This study examined the effect of an 8-week exercise intervention on functional exercise capacity in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: assisted cycling (ACT) (n = 17) where participants experienced at least a 35% increase in their voluntary cycling speed through the use of a motor, voluntary cycling (VC) (n = 15) where participants cycled at a self-selected cadence, and no cycling (NC) (n = 8) where participants did not participate in any cycling intervention. In each cycling intervention, each participant completed three, 30 minute cycling sessions per week for a total of eight weeks. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) was administered prior to and after the 8-week intervention in pre-test and post-test assessment sessions, respectively. Our hypothesis was somewhat supported in that functional exercise capacity improved after ACT as measured by an increase in total number of laps walked, total distance walked, and average walking speed during the 6MWT, when compared to VC or NC.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

137402-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) Improves Depression in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on depression in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Twelve participants randomly completed one of two

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on depression in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Twelve participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions. The interventions were: 1) Voluntary Cycling (VC), in which participants cycled at their self-selected pedaling rate 2) Assisted Cycling (AC), in which the participants' voluntary pedaling rates were augmented with a motor to ensure the maintenance of 80 rpms. In each intervention, the participant completed three cycling sessions each week for a total of eight weeks. Depression scores did decrease or improved after both AC and VC, but not significantly. There was a greater mean improvement for participants in the AC group than VC when analyzing total score and t-score. Future research will include a greater sample size and control group to reach significant results as well as try and reveal the mechanisms involved in these mental health improvements found after an acute bout of assisted cycling in adolescents with DS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

137750-Thumbnail Image.png

Preferred Versus Recommended Saddle Height For Optimal Cycling Economy

Description

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of changing a saddle height to a scientifically recommended position on cycling economy for competitive cyclists. Participants completed one maximal

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of changing a saddle height to a scientifically recommended position on cycling economy for competitive cyclists. Participants completed one maximal effort graded exercise test and two sub-maximal 70% economy trials, one at the cyclist’s original saddle height and the second at the saddle height corresponding with a knee flexion angle of 25° at full pedal extension. Due to experimental error and equipment failure heart rate became the main performance measure and cycling economy tests were conducted at an average of 84.4% of heart rate max. The results revealed no apparent differences in performance between the recommended and original saddle height. However, 2D analysis of dynamic knee angles revealed that at the 25° knee angle condition, knee angle increased by an average of 16.1% from the static position (average dynamic knee angle = 29.02±4.61°). Dynamic measures (32.59±4.88°) taken during the original angle tests were only slightly augmented compared to the static measure (31.5±2.18°). It is possible based on this trend that a difference in performance values was not present because the change between the original angle and the experimental angle was not substantial. Additionally these findings suggest that cyclists adjust to these acute changes in saddle height by altering other kinematic variables in an attempt to find a comfortable position and perform maximally.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

131986-Thumbnail Image.png

An Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Drag on Different Cycling Outfits

Description

An experimental investigation was conducted to calculate the aerodynamic drag on a cyclist wearing different types of clothing. The different outfits worn for this experiment were a professional skinsuit, a

An experimental investigation was conducted to calculate the aerodynamic drag on a cyclist wearing different types of clothing. The different outfits worn for this experiment were a professional skinsuit, a professional cycling kit, a t-shirt and shorts, and a long-sleeved flannel and jeans. The aerodynamic drag was ultimately found using the coast down method, a process in which a cyclist increases their speed to a chosen maximum threshold, and upon reaching this speed, ceases the pedal stroke and maintains the aero position until the bicycle comes to a stop. The data was gathered using an AeroPod, speed sensor, and GPS unit. The data gathered was imported into Excel for data analysis. The average CdA values at race speed (26-30 ft/s) for the skinsuit, cycling kit, t-shirt and shorts, and flannel were calculated to be 4.180 ft2, 3.668 ft2, 4.884 ft2, and 4.223 ft2, respectively. These race speed averages were found using data from three separate Ironman Triathlons. The cycling kit was found to be the most aerodynamic at the race speed. The results of this study reveal that cycling apparel can only be optimized for a small range of speeds and cycling outside of this optimal range delays the initiation of the reduction of boundary layer separation, thus resulting in more critical time spent in the flow transition region. The skinsuit’s performance was more aerodynamically efficient than the cycling kit at speeds greater than 36.8 mph. The cycling kit is more aerodynamic for speeds slower than 36.8 mph. The slickness of the skinsuit was found to be detrimental to the cyclist’s aerodynamic drag, as the lack of roughness on the skinsuit prevented the initiation of turbulent flow, which results in a decrease in drag. Overall, the experiment confirmed the hypothesis that a cyclist is more aerodynamic when wearing cycling apparel as opposed to casual, loose-fitting clothing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

155279-Thumbnail Image.png

Acute bouts of assisted cycling therapy for people with chronic stroke-related deficits

Description

Background: Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability in the United States (US). Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) incorporates the use of an electric motor to enhance the rotations per

Background: Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability in the United States (US). Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) incorporates the use of an electric motor to enhance the rotations per minute (rpm). ACT of about 80 rpm, has been associated with improvements in motor, cognitive, and clinical function. The acute effects of ACT on motor and cognitive function of persons with stroke induced deficits have not been investigated.

Purpose: To compare the acute effects of ACT, voluntary cycling (VC), and no cycling (NC) on upper and lower extremity motor function and executive function in adults with chronic stroke (age: 60 ± 16 years; months since stroke: 96 ± 85).

Methods: Twenty-two participants (gender: female = 6, male = 16; types: ischemic = 12, hemorrhagic = 10; sides: left lesion = 15, right lesion = 7) completed one session of ACT, one session of VC and one session of NC on separate days using a 3 x 3 crossover design.

Results: ACT lead to greater improvements in lower and upper extremity function on the paretic and non-paretic side than VC or NC (all p < 0.05), except in the non-paretic lower extremity where ACT and VC produced similar improvement (both p < 0.05). ACT and VC, but not NC, were associated with improvements in inhibition (p < 0.05). A positive relationship between cadence and motor function (P < 0.05) was found. Ratings of perceived exertion shared an inverted-U shaped relationship with measures of processing speed (p < 0.05) and a negative linear relationship with measures of executive function (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: ACT appears to benefit paretic and non-paretic motor function globally whereas the benefits of VC are more task specific. Faster cycling cadence was associated with greater improvements in global motor function. ACT and VC seem to carry similar acute benefits in inhibition.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017