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The Effects of Embodied Cognition and Dialogic Reading on Children's Literacy Skills

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Both dialogic reading and embodied cognition have showed to be effective strategies in the development of early literacy skills. Additionally, the use of electronic books has been found to also have a positive effect, including in combination with dialogic reading.

Both dialogic reading and embodied cognition have showed to be effective strategies in the development of early literacy skills. Additionally, the use of electronic books has been found to also have a positive effect, including in combination with dialogic reading. The effectiveness of dialogic reading and embodied strategy while reading an e-book has not been compared. The purpose of the study is to determine if embodied cognition can improve dialogic reading practices and possibly offer a theoretical framework for why dialogical reading practices work. Additionally, this study aims to determine the impact of embodied cognition and dialogic reading on the development of both vocabulary and story recall skills in preschool-aged children. Twenty-nine preschool children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old took part in a matched pairs experiment that included reading an e-book. Children in the experimental groups received four readings of either an embodied cognition condition or a dialogic reading condition. Following the four readings, the groups switched treatment. The children who received the embodied cognition conditions scored significantly higher on both story recall and vocabulary acquisition compared to those in the dialogic reading and control groups. Results of the study suggest embodied cognition in conjugation with dialogic reading practices could provide a more effective and improved model for promoting early literacy skills.

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2018-05

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Do Emotions Make A Difference? Determining if Positive Emotions Moderate the Effectiveness of an Embodied Language Comprehension Intervention

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Previous research demonstrated the overall efficacy of an embodied language intervention (EMBRACE) that taught pre-school children how to simulate (imagine) language in a heard narrative. However, EMBRACE was not effective for every child. To try to explain this variable

Previous research demonstrated the overall efficacy of an embodied language intervention (EMBRACE) that taught pre-school children how to simulate (imagine) language in a heard narrative. However, EMBRACE was not effective for every child. To try to explain this variable response to the intervention, the video recordings made during the four-day intervention sessions were assessed and emotion was coded. Each session was emotion-coded for child emotions and for child-researcher emotions. The child specific emotions were 1) engagement in the task, this included level of participation in the activity, 2) motivation/attention to persist and complete the task, as well as stay focused, and 3) positive affect throughout the session. The child-researcher specific emotions were 1) engagement with each other, this involved how the child interacted with the researcher and under what context, and 2) researcher’s positive affect, this incorporated how enthusiastic and encouraging the researcher was throughout the session. It was hypothesized that effectiveness of the intervention would be directly correlated with the degree that the child displayed positive emotions during the intervention. Thus, the analysis of these emotions should highlight differences between the control and EMBRACE group and help to explain variability in effectiveness of the intervention. The results did indicate that children in the EMBRACE group generally had a significantly higher positive affect compared to the control group, but these results did not influence the ability for the child to effectively recall or moderate the EEG variables in the post-test. The results also showed that children who interacted with the researcher more tended to be in the EMBRACE group, whereas children who did not interact with the researcher more frequently were in the control group, showing that the EMBRACE intervention ended up being a more collaborative task.

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2020-05

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Addressing Childhood Trauma in the Classroom

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Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of

Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of maltreated children, the one sure sanctuary is school. However, this idea requires teachers to be actively involved in identifying and caring for the children who need it most. Traumatic childhood experiences leave lasting scars on its victims, so it is helpful if teachers learn how to identify and support children who have lived through them. It is unfortunate that teachers will most likely encounter children throughout their career who have experienced horrendous things, but it is a reality. With this being said, teachers need to develop an understanding of what traumatized children live with, and learn how to address these issues with skilled sensitivity. Schools are not just a place where children learn how to read and write; they build the foundation for a successful life. This project was designed to provide teachers with a necessary resource for helping children who have suffered traumatic experiences. The methodology of this project began with interviews with organizations specializing in working with traumatized children such as Arizonans for Children, Free Arts for Abused Children, The Sojourner Center, and UMOM. The next step was a review of the current literature on the subject of childhood trauma. The findings have all been compiled into one, convenient document for teacher use and distribution. Upon completion of this document, an interactive video presentation will be made available through an online education website, so that distribution will be made simpler. Hopefully, teachers will share the information with people in their networks and create a chain reaction. The goal is to make it available to as many teachers as possible, so that more children will receive the support they need.

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2016-05

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Integrating Music in the Classroom

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A look at the benefits of the integration of music in the classroom. This thesis focuses on how music supports brain development and how that affects the ways children learn the classroom. It also highlights how current teachers feel about

A look at the benefits of the integration of music in the classroom. This thesis focuses on how music supports brain development and how that affects the ways children learn the classroom. It also highlights how current teachers feel about integrating music in the classroom and the best practices used for integrating music. Lastly, this thesis contains strategies on how to integrate music in the classroom using the Common Core standards as well as personal compositions written using Common Core standards.

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2013-05

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Examining the Effects of Embodiment on Self-Regulation Skills in Preschoolers

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Embodiment refers to the interactions between the brain, the body, one’s behavior, and the surrounding physical and social worlds (Glenberg, 2010). Embodied cognition can be utilized to teach various aspects of human behavior, especially life skills. Psychologists have defined self-regulation

Embodiment refers to the interactions between the brain, the body, one’s behavior, and the surrounding physical and social worlds (Glenberg, 2010). Embodied cognition can be utilized to teach various aspects of human behavior, especially life skills. Psychologists have defined self-regulation as managing one’s thoughts, emotions, and behaviors to achieve goals (Rosanbalm & Murray, 2017; Dettmer et al., 2020). In this study, researchers examined the interaction of these concepts to determine whether embodied cognitive tasks could facilitate self-regulation skills in a sample of preschoolers and kindergarteners. Researchers recruited twenty-six participants aged three to six from ASU’s Child Study Lab. Researchers matched participants on PPVT scores, and one from each pair was randomly assigned to the traditional (control) group while the other was assigned to the embodied (experimental) group. In phase one, the embodied group received four sequential thought lesson plans based on physical manipulation of materials. The traditional group received four sequential thought lesson plans in a traditional, two-dimensional format. In phase two, all participants received four traditional-style impulse control lesson plans. Researchers used a factorial ANOVA to analyze both groups’ pre and post-test data in each phase. In phase one, the children in the embodied group displayed greater improvements in sequential thought skills than their counterparts in the traditional group, who only slightly improved overall. In phase two, the previously-embodied group ended with a higher average post-test score than the traditional group. This interaction effect could be attributed to the differences in training methods received in the sequential thought phase. This study would need to be replicated with a larger, more representative sample to determine a statistically significant effect.

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Date Created
2022-05

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Examining the Effects of Embodiment on Self-Regulation Skills in Preschoolers

Description

Embodiment refers to the interactions between the brain, the body, one’s behavior, and the surrounding physical and social worlds (Glenberg, 2010). Embodied cognition can be utilized to teach various aspects of human behavior, especially life skills. Psychologists have defined self-regulation

Embodiment refers to the interactions between the brain, the body, one’s behavior, and the surrounding physical and social worlds (Glenberg, 2010). Embodied cognition can be utilized to teach various aspects of human behavior, especially life skills. Psychologists have defined self-regulation as managing one’s thoughts, emotions, and behaviors to achieve goals (Rosanbalm & Murray, 2017; Dettmer et al., 2020). In this study, researchers examined the interaction of these concepts to determine whether embodied cognitive tasks could facilitate self-regulation skills in a sample of preschoolers and kindergarteners. Researchers recruited twenty-six participants aged three to six from ASU’s Child Study Lab. Researchers matched participants on PPVT scores, and one from each pair was randomly assigned to the traditional (control) group while the other was assigned to the embodied (experimental) group. In phase one, the embodied group received four sequential thought lesson plans based on physical manipulation of materials. The traditional group received four sequential thought lesson plans in a traditional, two-dimensional format. In phase two, all participants received four traditional-style impulse control lesson plans. Researchers used a factorial ANOVA to analyze both groups’ pre and post-test data in each phase. In phase one, the children in the embodied group displayed greater improvements in sequential thought skills than their counterparts in the traditional group, who only slightly improved overall. In phase two, the previously-embodied group ended with a higher average post-test score than the traditional group. This interaction effect could be attributed to the differences in training methods received in the sequential thought phase. This study would need to be replicated with a larger, more representative sample to determine a statistically significant effect.

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Date Created
2022-05