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Sign of the Times: Interactions between D/deaf and Hearing Communities at Arizona State University (ASU)

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This study examines the interactions and intentions of D/deaf and hearing students who participate in the American Sign Language (ASL) Club and deaf Devils Club at Arizona State University (ASU). By exploring how and why students choose to participate in

This study examines the interactions and intentions of D/deaf and hearing students who participate in the American Sign Language (ASL) Club and deaf Devils Club at Arizona State University (ASU). By exploring how and why students choose to participate in these organizations, one can better understand interactions between D/deaf and hearing communities. This study explores reasons hearing students become involved with d/Deaf communities, the types of interactions the hearing and d/Deaf students participate in, and how student involvement can benefit from these interactions. Qualitative interviews with students of different hearing abilities and observations inside both clubs inform this study. The implications of this research may be applicable to other D/deaf communities.

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Date Created
2020-05

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A bilingual, bicultural interpreter and researcher navigates blurry boundaries and intersectionality

Description

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process of deaf students in kindergarten classrooms in three countries. The

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process of deaf students in kindergarten classrooms in three countries. The course of this paper will focus on three instances that took place in Japan and America. The analysis of these examples will bring to light the concept of taking on multiple roles, including graduate research assistant, interpreter, cultural mediator, and sociolinguistic consultant within a research project serving to uncover challenging personal and professional dilemmas and crossing boundaries; the dual roles, interpreter and researcher being the primary focus. This analysis results in a brief look at a thought provoking, yet evolving task of the researcher/interpreter. Maintaining multiple roles in the study the researcher is able to potentially identify and contribute "hidden" knowledge that may have been overlooked by other members of the research team. Balancing these different roles become key implications when interpreting practice, ethical boundaries, and participant research at times the lines of separation are blurred.

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Date Created
2011