Matching Items (9)

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International Student-American Counselor Dyadic Relationships

Description

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international students reached 1.18 million as of May 2017 (Smith, 2017).

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international students reached 1.18 million as of May 2017 (Smith, 2017). Whereas both first year international and domestic students experience difficulties associated with their status as university students, international students appear to be more vulnerable to experience psychological distress, as compared to their domestic peers (Edmond, 1997). Research has shown, that international students report higher levels of stress related to social difficulty as opposed to domestic students (Edmond, 1997). Given these patterns, it is not surprising that international students entering U.S. universities may be more likely to seek and receive counseling services than before. A study conducted with students, both international and domestic, compared trends from 2004 to 2006 of students utilizing counseling services; results revealed a 10 percent increase in international students' utilization of counseling services. (Cheng, Mallinckrodt, Soet, & Sevig, 2010). Such increase in the number of international students seeking counseling services appears to necessitate current and future practitioners to be well-equipped to work with this unique and diverse client population of international students. The goal of this study is to explore the experience of two current day American counselors working with international students using grounded theory of analysis to analyze the transcriptions of semi-structured interviews and to ultimately inform current and future practice in the treatment of international students undergoing counseling

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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A Look into Current Immersion Programs and Their Effectiveness in Employment

Description

International students within the United States make up for a large portion of the student
population, especially at Arizona State University (ASU), one of the largest public universities in the states (“Most International Students: National Universities”, n.d.). In order to

International students within the United States make up for a large portion of the student
population, especially at Arizona State University (ASU), one of the largest public universities in the states (“Most International Students: National Universities”, n.d.). In order to allow for these students to acclimate better to their new surroundings, immersion programs are offered to international students, where they are able to practice and develop their English, as well as learn more about the new culture(s) that surrounds them. This thesis poses the question of how, and in what ways, are immersion programs helping international students in terms of job- and career- readiness. At the conclusion of the thesis, it will recommend different changes that will positively benefit the students. The study focused on third- and fourth-year students at ASU, and the target group were students in the W. P. Carey School of Business. The methodology will be a mixed-methodology approach, starting with a quantitative survey. This survey asks initial questions, such as if a student has been part of an immersion program, in what ways those programs were helpful, and whether or not they had a post-graduate job opportunity in place. Next, a qualitative interview is conducted, where more clarifying questions are asked to deeply examine how students feel about the use, or the lack thereof, of such programs. Through these interviews, the researcher will pull a table of recurrent themes that were mentioned. The study found that the majority of international students at ASU were not part of an immersion program, and there was an overwhelming call for more resources to be put in place for immersion programs to assist students more to be career ready. At the conclusion of the study, three recommendations were made for immersion programs to improve on: placing more emphasis on career planning, a larger focus on interviewing and job preparation, and create more programs that promote more academic planning advising for students.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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International students at ASU and how they handle stress

Description

This paper will highlight the ways that Chinese students handle stress due to different reasons and how they solve their stress. The main reasons include different education styles, cultural differences between the US and China, food, language, entertainment ways and

This paper will highlight the ways that Chinese students handle stress due to different reasons and how they solve their stress. The main reasons include different education styles, cultural differences between the US and China, food, language, entertainment ways and religious. Chinese students have many methods to solve stress that include both positive and negative ways. I will provide more details about the ways in the third part in which I report the findings of my survey. My study is relevant because of the large numbers of Chinese students who are studying internationally.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-12

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Marketing ASU to Chinese Students

Description

ASU's international student population has been growing exponentially in the last few years. Specifically, the fastest growing group has been international students from China. However, many of these students are arriving with inaccurate expectations of life at an American university.

ASU's international student population has been growing exponentially in the last few years. Specifically, the fastest growing group has been international students from China. However, many of these students are arriving with inaccurate expectations of life at an American university. Furthermore, prospective students in China that have a desire to attend school in the U.S. are struggling to find a university that is affordable and respected. There is a huge opportunity for ASU to reach this market of students and increase their enrollment of international Chinese students. Our project aimed to create advertisements of ASU that target international Chinese students and their parents. The purpose of our project is to provide inspiration that ASU can utilize to create a professional marketing campaign to target this population of potential students.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

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ASCEND AT ASU: STRATEGIES FOR ENGAGING PAN-ASIAN STUDENTS AT THE W. P. CAREY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Description

Ascend is the premier non-profit professional association that enables its members, corporate partners and the community to realize the leadership potential of Pan-Asians in global corporations. Ascend at Arizona State University (ASU) was founded in March 2011 as a student

Ascend is the premier non-profit professional association that enables its members, corporate partners and the community to realize the leadership potential of Pan-Asians in global corporations. Ascend at Arizona State University (ASU) was founded in March 2011 as a student affiliate of the national Ascend organization. There are four ultimate goals for this thesis: 1) to create an operations and transition guide for Ascend's future leadership; 2) to develop strategies and tactics to improve Ascend's operations; 3) to better establish and integrate Ascend within the W. P. Carey School of Business; and 4) to better understand and provide for the unique needs of international students within the W. P. Carey School of Business. An analysis of external trends at the W. P. Carey School of Business and ASU reveals that international students represent a rapidly growing demographic. Ascend, although successful during its first year of operations, must adapt in order to best provide for the unique needs of this demographic. At the same time, it must continue to service the needs of its overall target markets: 1) Asian students (both American-born and international) and 2) students seeking to work in Asia. In order to set the platform for the continued success of the organization moving forward, specific and measurable objectives, strategies, and tactics were developed. The organization's financial condition, executive board, committees, membership, student recruitment, events, support network, and mentor program were identified as the crucial elements that must be developed in order to ensure improvement in the organization moving forward. Finally, in order to ensure the continued integration of Ascend within the W. P. Carey School of Business, the business school can pursue strategies to better serve the unique needs of international students.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

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A voluntary summer art course for at-risk students attending Job Corps: a qualitative study

Description

Many alternative schools for at-risk students do not offer art classes to their students. Phoenix Job Corps is one of those schools. I conducted a qualitative study about a voluntary summer art course at Phoenix Job Corps, a vocational school

Many alternative schools for at-risk students do not offer art classes to their students. Phoenix Job Corps is one of those schools. I conducted a qualitative study about a voluntary summer art course at Phoenix Job Corps, a vocational school for at-risk students. I had thirteen student volunteers, eight of them refugees from other countries. All the participants created a narrative painting about something in their lives. The purpose of this study was to examine this voluntary summer art course and to determine its usefulness as a beneficial tool to the lives of the students. This included looking at participants' narrative paintings to determine common themes or subjects, finding out their opinions on whether or not their school should offer an art course, their willingness to share their stories, determining whether they think it's important for others to see their work, and lastly concluding what artwork they like best and why. I found that the majority of students do want an art class offered at their schools, and all but one participant was more than willing to share their story about their narrative painting. Common themes amongst their paintings were family, a specific memory or event, or their present and future lives. I found similar subject matter in their paintings such as animals, houses or huts, and people. My research also unveiled a large difference in the refugee students' paintings as opposed to the other United States participants. The findings also suggest that participants judged other work based on meaning more so than aesthetics. This study explores, in detail, the narrative art and experiences of a very diverse group of students.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Attitudes Toward Intercultural Friends and Dating of Chinese Students at Arizona State University

Description

This study investigates the relationship between intercultural friendships and attitudes towards intercultural dating—from the perspective of Asian students studying in the United States. Twenty Chinese students completed an online, 19-item questionnaire (Survey Monkey) surveying the cultural diversity of their

This study investigates the relationship between intercultural friendships and attitudes towards intercultural dating—from the perspective of Asian students studying in the United States. Twenty Chinese students completed an online, 19-item questionnaire (Survey Monkey) surveying the cultural diversity of their friendships (age, gender, religion, nationality, and language) and also their attitudes toward dating White U.S. Americans. The data were submitted to statistical tests and the results revealed no significant correlation between success in developing U.S. American friends, diversity of friendship networks, and interest in dating a White U.S. American. These non-significant results may be due to a limitation of the study--the small number of respondents. However additional findings revealed a high percentage of respondents expressed interest in making friends and dating White U.S. Americans. They also identified major challenges involved--language barriers and cultural differences. Finally, future research directions and applications of research findings are presented.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

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Introduction to social justice oriented arts-based inquiry

Description

ABSTRACT

This dissertation addresses the question of how participation in an arts-based sojourn influences university instructors’ perspectives and understanding as related to working with international female Muslim students (FMS). It also addresses what participation in a social justice oriented arts-based inquiry

ABSTRACT

This dissertation addresses the question of how participation in an arts-based sojourn influences university instructors’ perspectives and understanding as related to working with international female Muslim students (FMS). It also addresses what participation in a social justice oriented arts-based inquiry reveals about transformation of perspectives and practices of FMS in instructors’ long-term trajectories. Social justice oriented arts-based inquiry is a powerful tool to unearth issues and challenges associated with creating and sustaining equitable practices in the classroom. This type of inquiry provided instructor-participants with a platform that facilitated their use of “equity lenses” to examine and reflect on external phenomena which may influence their classroom practices as related to FMS. Participation in the art-based sojourn facilitated multiple opportunities for the instructor-participants to reflect critically on their practices, understanding, and perspectives of FMS. This study revealed that the most significant shifts in understanding and perspectives about FMS followed from long-term events and moments in the instructor-participants’ teaching careers.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017

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Re-thinking Engineering Doctoral Students’ Sense of Belonging: In Consideration of Diversity in Citizenship and Interpersonal Interactions

Description

A defining feature of many United States (U.S.) doctoral engineering programs is their large proportion of international students. Despite the large student body and the significant impacts that they bring to the U.S. education and economy, a scarcity of research

A defining feature of many United States (U.S.) doctoral engineering programs is their large proportion of international students. Despite the large student body and the significant impacts that they bring to the U.S. education and economy, a scarcity of research on engineering doctoral students has taken into consideration the existence of international students and the consequential diversity in citizenship among all students. This study was designed to bridge the research gap to improve the understanding of sense of belonging from the perspective of international engineering doctoral students.

A multi-phase mixed methods research approach was taken for this study. The qualitative strand focused on international engineering doctoral students’ sense of belonging and its constructs. Semi-structured interview data were collected from eight international students enrolled at engineering doctoral programs at four different institutions. Thematic analysis and further literature review produced a conceptual structure of sense of belonging among international engineering doctoral students: authentic-self, problem behavior, academic self-efficacy, academic belonging, sociocultural belonging, and perceived institutional support.

The quantitative strand of this study broadened the study’s population to all engineering doctoral students, including domestic students, and conducted comparative analyses between international and domestic student groups. An instrument to measure the Engineering Doctoral Students’ Quality of Interaction (EDQI instrument) was developed while considering the multicultural nature of interactions and the discipline-specific characteristics of engineering doctoral programs. Survey data were collected from 653 engineering doctoral students (383 domestic and 270 international) at 36 R1 institutions across the U.S. Exploratory Factor Analysis results confirmed the construct validity and reliability of the data collected from the instrument and indicated the factor structures for the students’ perceived quality interactions among domestic and international student groups. A set of separate regression analyses results indicated the significance of having meaningful interactions to students’ sense of belonging and identified the groups of people who make significant impacts on students’ sense of belonging for each subgroup. The emergent findings provide an understanding of the similarities and differences in the contributors of sense of belonging between international and domestic students, which can be used to develop tailored support structures for specific student groups.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020