Matching Items (25)

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Problematic Peer Behaviors Among Older Adults in Low-Income Housing

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Abstract The purpose of this study is to draw attention to problematic peer behaviors experienced among older adults in low income housing. Antagonistic behaviors including peer bullying are commonly associated with youth yet they also occur among older adults. This

Abstract The purpose of this study is to draw attention to problematic peer behaviors experienced among older adults in low income housing. Antagonistic behaviors including peer bullying are commonly associated with youth yet they also occur among older adults. This study shares findings from a recent study of negative social interactions among older adults in independent low-income housing. Using a sample size of 11 tenants, and semi-structured interviews, this author used thematic analysis to code and categorize themes. This author found that common themes included types of behaviors experienced, contributing factors, interventions and perceived barriers to interventions. Results indicated that tenants experienced a variety of antagonistic behaviors including verbal, physical and relational aggression. The most common behaviors reported were verbal threatening (36.4%) and being gossiped about (54.4%). The least common reported were physical behaviors (27.3%). Tenants reported the most common contributing factor for the aggressor's actions as having mental health or emotional issues (45.5%), whereas they reported physical disability as the most common contributing factor in those who were victimized (54.5%). Individuals reported responding to these behaviors most commonly through isolation, withdrawal, and avoidance. Findings suggest the need for interventions to minimize bullying and other antagonistic behaviors in low-income housing. Additionally, findings suggest the need to help those who are mistreated to find ways to address the bullying in more positive ways. Keywords: themes, behaviors, factors, interventions, barriers

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Investigating the Effect of Sleep Deprivation on the Startle Response

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Older adults tend to learn at a lesser extent and slower rate than younger individuals. This is especially problematic for older adults at risk to injury or neurological disease who require therapy to learn and relearn motor skills. There is

Older adults tend to learn at a lesser extent and slower rate than younger individuals. This is especially problematic for older adults at risk to injury or neurological disease who require therapy to learn and relearn motor skills. There is evidence that the reticulospinal system is critical to motor learning and that deficits in the reticulospinal system may be responsible, at least in part, for learning deficits in older adults. Specifically, delays in the reticulospinal system (measured via the startle reflex) are related to poor motor learning and retention in older adults. However, the mechanism underlying these delays in the reticulospinal system is currently unknown.

Along with aging, sleep deprivation is correlated with learning deficits. Research has shown that a lack of sleep negatively impacts motor skill learning and consolidation. Since there is a link between sleep and learning, as well as learning and the reticulospinal system, these observations raise the question: does sleep deprivation underlie reticulospinal delays? We hypothesized that sleep deprivation was correlated to a slower startle response, indicating a delayed reticulospinal system. Our objectives were to observe the impact of sleep deprivation on 1) the startle response (characterized by muscle onset latency and percentage of startle responses elicited) and 2) functional performance (to determine whether subjects were sufficiently sleep deprived).

21 young adults participated in two experimental sessions: one control session (8-10 hour time in bed opportunity for at least 3 nights prior) and one sleep deprivation session (0 hour time in bed opportunity for one night prior). The same protocol was conducted during each session. First, subjects were randomly exposed to 15 loud, startling acoustic stimuli of 120 dB. Electromyography (EMG) data measured muscle activity from the left and right sternocleidomastoid (LSCM and RSCM), biceps brachii, and triceps brachii. To assess functional performance, cognitive, balance, and motor tests were also administered. The EMG data were analyzed in MATLAB. A generalized linear mixed model was performed on LSCM and RSCM onset latencies. Paired t-tests were performed on the percentage of startle responses elicited and functional performance metrics. A p-value of less than 0.05 indicated significance.

Thirteen out of 21 participants displayed at least one startle response during their control and sleep deprived sessions and were further analyzed. No differences were found in onset latency (RSCM: control = 75.87 ± 21.94ms, sleep deprived = 82.06 ± 27.47ms; LSCM: control = 79.53 ± 17.85ms, sleep deprived = 78.48 ± 20.75ms) and percentage of startle responses elicited (control = 84.10 ± 15.53%; sleep deprived = 83.59 ± 18.58%) between the two sessions. However, significant differences were observed in reaction time, TUG with Dual time, and average balance time with the right leg up. Our data did not support our hypothesis; no significant differences were seen between subjects’ startle responses during the control and sleep deprived sessions. However, sleep deprivation was indicated with declines were observed in functional performance. Therefore, we concluded that sleep deprivation may not affect the startle response and underlie delays in the reticulospinal system.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Effects of Decreased Opportunity to Sleep on Cognitive Performance and Mood by Sex in Older Adults

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Objectives: The goal of this study was to compare older adults (ages 60 to 80) with a fixed sleep schedule compared to a restricted sleep schedule. The purpose was to determine if reducing one's sleep by an hour each night

Objectives: The goal of this study was to compare older adults (ages 60 to 80) with a fixed sleep schedule compared to a restricted sleep schedule. The purpose was to determine if reducing one's sleep by an hour each night for 12 weeks, led to worse cognition and mood over time. Study Design: The study contained two groups: older adults with their sleep restricted and older adults with their sleep un-restricted. Participants were recruited by researchers at Arizona State University and The University of Arizona by advertising in newspapers, on flyers in senior centers, and on radio stations. After rigorous screening for health conditions, current sleep patterns and depression, individuals entered the study. Participants completed the Geriatric Depression Scale after two weeks of baseline, and again after treatment week 14 of the study. Likewise, males and females performed three cognitive tests after two weeks of baseline, and again after treatment week 14 of the study. These cognitive tests included Stroop Color and Word Test, Trail making and PVT. Results: The depression scale and three cognitive tests showed that there was no significant difference with cognition and mood over 14 weeks between individuals with a fixed sleep schedule compared to a restricted sleep schedule. Conclusions: Reducing older adult's sleep duration by an hour each night for 14 weeks does not produce negative effects, and does not provoke signs of depression or weakened cognition.

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Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Music Therapy and Its Effects on Anxiety and Depression in Older Adults Living in Independent Living Homes

Description

Research supports that music therapy can be used in multiple aspects of care for patients living within different environments. There is a gap in the literature when it comes to the impact of music sessions for older adults who do

Research supports that music therapy can be used in multiple aspects of care for patients living within different environments. There is a gap in the literature when it comes to the impact of music sessions for older adults who do not have a diagnosed disease, therefore this study analyzes this population specifically. This study examines music therapy and its effects on anxiety and depression in adults aged 65 or older living in independent living homes. The adults participated in a mixed-methods study over the span of one month examining music as an intervention to decrease anxiety and depression. Each subject consented into the study, completed a demographic survey, answered open-ended questions regarding their experience with anxiety/sadness and ways to cope, as well as Profile of Moods Scale (POMS) during the first session. On the last week of the study, the participants were asked to fill out the same POMS scale to evaluate whether music influenced anxiety and depression. There was limited evidence found in this study to support the use of music therapy as an intervention to decrease anxiety and depression in adults over the age of 65.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Cognitive Planning Improved after Cycling Exercise in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

Executive function is a crucial part of daily living and activities for individuals with Down Syndrome (DS). The aim of this study was to examine if Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) would improve cognitive planning as measured by the Tower of

Executive function is a crucial part of daily living and activities for individuals with Down Syndrome (DS). The aim of this study was to examine if Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) would improve cognitive planning as measured by the Tower of London (TOL), set switching as measured by the modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and spatial memory as measured by the Corsi Block Test in older adults with DS. Twenty-six participants were randomly assigned to one of three interventions over eight weeks. 1) Thirteen older adults with DS completed the ACT intervention, which is stationary cycling with the assistance of a motor to maintain a cadence at least 35% greater than voluntary cycling. 2) Eleven older adults with DS completed voluntary cycling (VC) and 3) Two older adults with DS were in our no cycling intervention. There were tests administered a week prior to the invention (or no intervention) and one week after their completed intervention (or no intervention). The pre- and post-tests were used to assess different measures, which could have been influenced from the eight-week intervention. The measures analyzed from our study were as followed; Tower of London, Card Sorting Test, and the Corsi Block Test. Our results showed that cognitive planning improved after ACT and VC, but not NC. Cognitive planning was assessed through the TOL task and showed improvements after the eight-week intervention (due to its sensitive nature in analyzing smaller changes pre- and post-intervention). Our results are discussed with respect to upregulation of neurotrophic factors that increase functioning in the prefrontal cortex that accompanies exercise.

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Date Created
2017-12

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The Effect of an Added Load on Postural Stability in Older Adults

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This study investigated the effect of a small added load on postural stability in older adults. Sixteen healthy older adults (6 male, 10 female, age=72 ± 3.2y, height=172± 9.3 cm, weight=84± 7.6 kg) performed clinical measures of postural control

This study investigated the effect of a small added load on postural stability in older adults. Sixteen healthy older adults (6 male, 10 female, age=72 ± 3.2y, height=172± 9.3 cm, weight=84± 7.6 kg) performed clinical measures of postural control with different loads placed on the shoulders (0%, 1% and 3% bodyweight). The functional reach test, comprising a forward, right and left lateral reach, along with COP data measured through the use of a force plate were the postural control measures utilized in this study. COP data used were COP sway velocity and COP mean sway area, in the form of a 95% confidence ellipse. During the COP trials, visual input (eyes open and eyes closed) and surface conditions (firm and foam) were varied to evaluate the effect of the loads under different conditions. Two trials of each measurement were performed for all tests, and participants were allowed rest intervals as needed. Anticipated results show a decreased reach distance of 8% in the forward direction, and a 7% decrease in the left and right lateral directions under a 1% bodyweight load. For expected results of COP velocity, there will be a 12% increase from baseline COP sway velocity in the 1% bodyweight condition. Anticipated results for COP sway area show a 39% increase in the eyes open firm surface, under a 1% bodyweight load, and a 40% increase under the 3% load. These expected results show a significant effect on postural control with a 1% and 3% bodyweight load placed on the shoulders of older adults. This information may be valuable in combatting the epidemic of falls seen among the elderly population, as part of an exercise program for improving balance and postural stability.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Intervention Principles to Improve Postural Stability in Older Adults

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The purpose of this paper was to review existing literature on exercise interventions to improve postural stability in older adults in order to assist with the development of a novel intervention with the same function. A brief review of balance

The purpose of this paper was to review existing literature on exercise interventions to improve postural stability in older adults in order to assist with the development of a novel intervention with the same function. A brief review of balance changes with aging is followed by a summary of the methods and findings of various interventions. Many types of interventions are discussed, including resistance training, balance training, t'ai chi, and whole body vibration. The studies show promising results, but none utilize the approach of the proposed intervention. This intervention being developed involves the use of a weighted vest to raise one's center of mass, creating a more unstable posture. Performing exercises or daily activities with the vest may improve balance by training muscles in unsteady conditions. The intervention principles to improve postural stability in older adults are beneficial to the foundation of future studies.

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Created

Date Created
2014-12

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Telling your stories: designing an online email based storytelling group for older adults

Description

The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of building a storytelling system for older adults to tell and share their life stories based on email. It is measured by the level of participation and people's acceptance of

The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of building a storytelling system for older adults to tell and share their life stories based on email. It is measured by the level of participation and people's acceptance of the system. The central goals were to empower people over 60 years old by providing a platform for them to share their wonderful life experience and perspectives on life and lead social services into the digital age by bridging traditional roundtable interaction and modern digital communication. A prototype was built to test the level of participation of the system and follow-up interviews were conducted in order to deeply understand people's acceptance. Content analysis was used to analyze the stories to ascertain what common themes were present. Key design considerations and key factors that affect the feasibility of storytelling system were discussed. This research expands on current research and implementation of Internet-based storytelling system and shed light on the future of combining storytelling with older adults' existing Internet knowledge. Key findings of this research are :(1) Frequency of reminiscence trigger and the number of active participants affect the level of participation collectively. Frequency is considered to be a key determinant. High frequency indicates high level of participation. (2) Categories of topics do not affect the level of participation significantly but serve as key attractions that enhance people's acceptance of the system. (3) Older adults highly accept and get involved in the new email storytelling system. This storytelling program helps them recall their memories and have a profound effect on their own introspection.

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Date Created
2014

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Association of objectively measured physical activity with cognitive function in black and white older adults: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study

Description

Background and purpose: Regular physical activity (PA) provides benefits for cognitive health and helps to improve or maintain quality of life among older adults. Objective PA measures have been increasingly used to overcome limitations of self-report measures. The purpose of

Background and purpose: Regular physical activity (PA) provides benefits for cognitive health and helps to improve or maintain quality of life among older adults. Objective PA measures have been increasingly used to overcome limitations of self-report measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of objectively measured PA and sedentary time with cognitive function among older adults.

Methods: Participants were recruited from the parent REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. ActicalTM accelerometers provided estimates of PA variables, including moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), high light PA (HLPA), low light PA (LLPA) and sedentary time, for 4-7 consecutive days. Prevalence and incidence of cognitive impairment were defined by the Six-Item Screener. Letter fluency, animal fluency, word list learning and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (orientation and recall) were conducted to assess executive function and memory.

Results: Of the 7,339 participants who provided accelerometer wear data > 4 days (70.1 ± 8.6 yr, 54.2% women, 31.7% African American), 320 participants exhibited impaired cognition. In cross-sectional analysis, participants in the highest MVPA% quartile had 39% lower odds of cognitive impairment than those in the lowest quartile (OR: 0.61, 95% C.I.: 0.39-0.95) after full adjustment. Further analysis shows most quartiles of MVPA% and HLPA% were significantly associated with executive function and memory (P<0.01). During 2.7 ± 0.5 years of follow-up, 3,385 participants were included in the longitudinal analysis, with 157 incident cases of cognitive impairment. After adjustments, participants in the highest MVPA% quartile had 51% lower hazards of cognitive impairment (HR: 0.49, 95% C.I.: 0.28-0.86). Additionally, MVPA% was inversely associated with change in memory z-scores (P<0.01), while the highest quartile of HLPA% was inversely associated with change in executive function and memory z-scores (P<0.01).

Conclusion: Higher levels of objectively measured MVPA% were independently associated with lower prevalence and incidence of cognitive impairment, and better memory and executive function in older adults. Higher levels of HLPA% were also independently associated with better memory and executive function. The amount of MVPA associated with lower risk of cognitive impairment (259 min/week) is >70% higher than the minimal amount of MVPA recommended by PA guidelines.

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Date Created
2015

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Enhancing motivation for physical activity to reduce fall risk among community dwelling older adults

Description

Unintentional falls among community dwelling older adults are a common, serious and potentially preventable public health problem. In the United States, the annual incidence of fall related injuries per 100,000 persons was 4,616 in 2001, rising to 5,252 in 2008.

Unintentional falls among community dwelling older adults are a common, serious and potentially preventable public health problem. In the United States, the annual incidence of fall related injuries per 100,000 persons was 4,616 in 2001, rising to 5,252 in 2008. The annual incidence of fall related deaths per 100,000 persons was 29.3 in 2000, rising to 41.86 in 2006. Older adults are particularly vulnerable to falls as they age. Potential consequences include fractures, emergency room, hospital and nursing home admissions, dependence, confusion, immobilization, depression, and death. Significant modifiable fall risk factors include muscle weakness, gait problems, and balance problems. While researchers have demonstrated the positive effects of balance and leg-strengthening physical activities, the majority of older adults do not engage in them, and the rate of falls continues to increase. Older adults participate in regular physical activity and fitness activities less often than younger populations; disparities are greater among those who are poor and living in rural communities. While knowledge about causes, risk factors, and efficacious physical activity to prevent falls has grown exponentially in the last several decades, bridging the gap between research and practice continues to be a challenge. As a strategy to address the gap between research and practice, this feasibility study utilized a tested theory, the wellness motivation theory, to address motivation for behavioral change in combination with instruction for physical activities proven to reduce fall risk. The study sample included rural, community dwelling older adults at risk of falls. The study included an innovative mobile computer to measure physical activity behavior and to augment motivational content of the intervention. Specific aims of this feasibility study were to: (a) examine the acceptability, demand, and implementation of the wellness motivation intervention (WMI) as well as the technology augmenting the WMI; and (b) evaluate the efficacy of the WMI to influence awareness of social contextual resources, behavioral change processes, physical activity, and fall risk. The WMI delivered in combination with proven multicomponent balance and strength activities was feasible and effectively increased motivation for behavioral change (social support from friends, awareness of social contextual resources, behavioral change processes) and physical activity behavior, and decreased fall risk among rural, community-dwelling older adults at risk of falls in this study. This study is the first step in a program of research focusing on enhancing motivation for physical activity that reduces falls and frailty among older adults.

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Date Created
2012