Matching Items (6)

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The Arts in Education: Teacher Perception and Classroom Integration

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the arts (visual arts, music, dance, and theater) in educational settings. It also sought to identify current teachers’ perceptions

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the arts (visual arts, music, dance, and theater) in educational settings. It also sought to identify current teachers’ perceptions of the arts as a teaching methodology. Arts in education is an expanding field of research and practice distinguished from arts education due to its investigation of learning through arts experiences. Arts experiences in classrooms can occur through a variety of mediums such as visual arts, music, dance, theater, and more. Specifically, this study examined how teachers perceive using various art forms and activities in the classroom to help students learn and communicate what they know, how frequently on average teachers use various art forms and activities in their classrooms, teacher attitudes and potential concerns about the arts in education, and why teachers would use the arts and what would make them use them more.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Native American students' perceptions of high-stakes testing in New Mexico

Description

Given the political and public demands for accountability, using the voices of students from the frontlines, this study investigated student perceptions of New Mexico's high-stakes testing program taking public schools

Given the political and public demands for accountability, using the voices of students from the frontlines, this study investigated student perceptions of New Mexico's high-stakes testing program taking public schools in the right direction. Did the students perceive the program having an impact on retention, drop outs, or graduation requirements? What were the perceptions of Navajo students in Navajo reservation schools as to the impact of high-stakes testing on their emotional, physical, social, and academic well-being? The specific tests examined were the New Mexico High School Competency Exam (NMHSCE) and the New Mexico Standard Based Assessment (SBA/ High School Graduation Assessment) on Native American students. Based on interviews published by the Daily Times of Farmington, New Mexico, our local newspaper, some of the students reported that the testing program was not taking schools in the right direction, that the test was used improperly, and that the one-time test scores were not an accurate assessment of students learning. In addition, they were cited on negative and positive effects on the curriculum, teaching and learning, and student and teacher motivation. Based on the survey results, the students' positive and negative concerns and praises of high-stakes testing were categorized into themes. The positive effects cited included the fact that the testing held students, educators, and parents accountable for their actions. The students were not opposed to accountability, but rather, opposed to the manner in which it was currently implemented. Several implications of these findings were examined: (a) requirements to pass the New Mexico High School Competency Exam; (b) what high stakes testing meant for the emotional well-being of the students; (c) the impact of sanctions under New Mexico's high-stakes testing proficiency; and (d) the effects of high-stakes tests on students' perceptions, experiences and attitudes. Student voices are not commonly heard in meetings and discussions about K-12 education policy. Yet, the adults who control policy could learn much from listening to what students have to say about their experiences.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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The accidental curricularist: the building of a dance curriculum through artistic and improvisational practice

Description

ABSTRACT This narrative study traces the development of a dance curriculum as it unfolded in an inner city public school. It examines the curriculum emergence through intersecting worlds of artistic

ABSTRACT This narrative study traces the development of a dance curriculum as it unfolded in an inner city public school. It examines the curriculum emergence through intersecting worlds of artistic practice, improvisation, lived experience and context. These worlds were organized and explored through themes of gender, emotion, longing and intersections and examined through lenses of critical theory, aesthetics and currere. It examines the interior dialogue within one individual educator who is both a dance artist and a teacher and reflects the differing and at times conflicting perspectives within those two positions. The curriculum acquired the name "curriculum by accident" because several highly unexpected events contributed to its development. The students were initially suspicious and hostile and presented significant resistance to classical dance as an artistic form. This resistance was circumvented through creative process and improvisation. The act of improvisation became both a way to approach teaching and curriculum development and as an artistic process. Improvisation courts chance, the unplanned and the accidental through a structure in which the unknown is as valued as the known. The school setting is one full of known subjects; curriculum, settings, procedures, people and expectations. Curriculum by accident was a circumstance in which a known (school) and an unknown (the evolving curriculum) melded. The development of curriculum by accident was a response to an array of intuitive and serendipitous cues. The curriculum seeped through the cracks of school experience and transmuted into a curriculum that was very successful.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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White flight in rural America: the case study of Lexington, Nebraska

Description

The term "White flight" and its effects are well documented in large urban city centers. However, few studies consider the same effects on smaller American communities. This case study

The term "White flight" and its effects are well documented in large urban city centers. However, few studies consider the same effects on smaller American communities. This case study investigates Lexington, Nebraska, a rural community of approximately 10,000 citizens, that has experienced a population influx of minorities in the last 25 years. The population shift has increased the representation of Hispanic, Asian, and now Somali students in the Lexington Public School system, which, in turn, has been accompanied by a dramatic decrease in White, Anglo students. This study attempts to identify and describe the reasons for the exodus of White students from the public school setting. Possible reasons that might explain the decreases in White student enrollment may include overcrowding in schools, unsafe school environments, and/or less one-on-one attention with classroom teachers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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The Implications of the Navajo Nation Sovereignty in Education Act of 2005 on Arizona reservation public schools

Description

In 2005, the Navajo Sovereignty in Education Act was signed into law by the Navajo Nation. Like the No Child Left Behind Act, this Navajo Nation legislation was as much

In 2005, the Navajo Sovereignty in Education Act was signed into law by the Navajo Nation. Like the No Child Left Behind Act, this Navajo Nation legislation was as much a policy statement as it was a law. It marked the first time that the Navajo Nation linked sovereignty with education by expressing its intent to control all education within its exterior boundaries. The objective of the law was to create a department of education that would resemble the states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah in which the Navajo Nation resides. Through their department of education, the Navajo Nation would operate the educational functions for its populace. This study looked at the implications and impact that perspectives of this law would have on public schools within Arizona from the perspective of five superintendents in Arizona public schools within the Navajo Nation were gained through open-ended interviews. It examined the legal, fiscal, and curricular issues through the prism of sovereignty. Through the process of interviews utilizing a set of guided questions in a semi-structured format, five superintendents in Arizona public schools within the Navajo Nation shared their perspectives. Analysis of the five interviews revealed curriculum, funding, jurisdictional, and fear or mistrust as problems the Navajo Nation will need to overcome if it is to begin full control of all aspects of education within its boundaries. There is a strong need for the Department of Dine' Education to educate public schools with regards to the Navajo Nation Sovereignty in Education Act of 2005. Administrators need more training in tribal governments. Like the constitution, the Navajo Sovereignty in Education Act will be interpreted differently by different people. But, without action, it will be ignored. Within the Act's pages are the hopes of the Navajo Nation and the dreams for our young Navajo students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011