Matching Items (17)

134979-Thumbnail Image.png

Improving Runway Capacity at Minneapolis St. Paul Airport

Description

Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these

Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these factors is the runway capacity. Strict rules regarding the amount of separation required between two aircraft landing at the same airport and lack of available land limit the ways that airport managers and planners can tackle this problem. Research was conducted at the Arizona State University's Simulator Building using the Adacel Tower Simulation System. Modifications to the airport were then made to simulate the high speed exit. Testing utilized aircraft in the large category, including Airbus A320s, which are regularly seen at the airport. Airport capacity dramatically increased as a result. The previous AAR was 33. With the research conducted, aircraft can exit the runway between 27 and 30 seconds with final approach speeds ranging from 130 knots to 150 knots. To allow for a margin for safety, a 35 second runway occupancy time is used. With that rate, assuming that other separation standards are changed to accommodate that traffic level, the runway AAR increases to approximately 100. To reach this potential, changes to the FAAs separation requirements for aircraft on the same final approach course must be made, to allow aircraft to be closer together.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

133657-Thumbnail Image.png

Investigation of FAA Research and Regulation of Insulin-Treated Diabetic Pilots

Description

The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an

The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an in depth investigation of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) regulation and data collection throughout time regarding pilots with Insulin Treated Diabetes Mellitus (ITDM). When in comparison to the continuous evolution of diabetic research and endocrinology in all parts of the world, the regulations regarding this group of pilots seems displaced. This paper explores a chronological order of FAA research and regulations that were conducted on diabetic pilots stemming from 1959 - present. The findings seem to convey that the field of aviation is laden with inconsistencies and misplaced conclusions regarding regulation of insulin-treated diabetic pilots. This paper reflects on the impact of these regulations on this group of pilots from both a biological and medical standpoint as well as from an aviation point of view. In light of advanced medical knowledge, the paper explores what regulations regarding ITDM are in other countries and how FAA regulation should be refined and altered to realign with present day medical knowledge in the United States. This research was conducted to compare the sequential endocrinologic knowledge conducted and the subsequent regulatory actions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133661-Thumbnail Image.png

Investigation of FAA Research and Regulation of Insulin-Treated Diabetic Pilots

Description

The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an

The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an in depth investigation of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) regulation and data collection throughout time regarding pilots with Insulin Treated Diabetes Mellitus (ITDM). When in comparison to the continuous evolution of diabetic research and endocrinology in all parts of the world, the regulations regarding this group of pilots seems displaced. This paper explores a chronological order of FAA research and regulations that were conducted on diabetic pilots stemming from 1959 - present. The findings seem to convey that the field of aviation is laden with inconsistencies and misplaced conclusions regarding regulation of insulin-treated diabetic pilots. This paper reflects on the impact of these regulations on this group of pilots from both a biological and medical standpoint as well as from an aviation point of view. In light of advanced medical knowledge, the paper explores what regulations regarding ITDM are in other countries and how FAA regulation should be refined and altered to realign with present day medical knowledge in the United States. This research was conducted to compare the sequential endocrinologic knowledge conducted and the subsequent regulatory actions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133779-Thumbnail Image.png

2014 Phoenix Flight Path Changes: A Good Thing?

Description

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to mitigate noise pollution and the effects that it has on the surrounding community. With the FAA currently progressing to modernize the National Airspace System, communities around the United States have expressed their concerns regarding changes of flight paths, notably the City of Phoenix. Public unrest has increased intensively since the implementation of Performance Based Navigation (PBN) departure procedures in September of 2014. The unrest has allegedly stemmed from a lack of consultation from the Federal Aviation Administration to the City of Phoenix and surrounding communities. Documented complaints have not only been filed by the City, but also by National Prehistoric Preservation areas within the valley. The City of Phoenix and the State of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the FAA to dispute the flight path changes. The court ruled in favor of Arizona and required the FAA to revert to the flight paths that were in place before the changes. This paper is an immersion into the current state of what has occurred within the Phoenix Terminal Airspace (PTA), the effects that the changes have had on the natural and social environment, the FAA, and the NextGen initiative which the FAA is said to be implementing. This paper will also inform the reader of how a departure procedure is created, how the public can stay better informed of what the FAA is planning, and possible long-term solutions that will satisfy both the environmental and modernization requirements placed on the PTA.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Guiding Aviation Students on How to Effectively Search for Internships

Description

This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation

This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation students for the purpose of guiding them in how to effectively search for internships. My internship experiences led to a full-time job offer and this project aims to help provide other aviation students with the same opportunities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

148179-Thumbnail Image.png

The Airline Industry: How the Pandemic Has and Continues to Reshape the Industry as We Know It

Description

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few days. The events that occurred on that specific day enacted changes that affect the industry to this day. This paper analyzes some of the changes that were made and discusses some of the changes the industry is going through again, about 20 years after the events on September 11th. The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we all live our daily lives and aviation is not exempt. Changes to aircraft cleaning procedures, boarding processes, and seat design have all been ways the industry has gone through changes. The results of a potential recovery as well as the long-term changes are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

137398-Thumbnail Image.png

ANALYSIS OF THE OWNERSHIP AND OPERATION OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWERS

Description

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government currently faces a problem of a tight financial budget and sequestration, which often times means mandatory budget cuts. This project provides one possible solution for the FAA to save money in their budget without adversely affecting safety. The FAA could establish appropriate criteria to compare all ATCTs. The FAA could then apply these criteria in a policy that would contract the operation of certain low-level ATCTs and conversely handle the operations at high-activity ATCTs. Additionally, the FAA could include a policy to transfer the ownership of certain low-activity towers, but transfer the ownership of high-activity towers to the FAA. The research was completed by studying various documents from the FAA, Department of Transportation (DOT), and industry groups. Most of the data analysis was conducted by creating tables, queries, and graphs from FAA data. The FAA data was found on their Air Traffic Activity Data System (ATADS). From my data analysis, I was able to identify sixty-nine ATCTs that are currently operated by the FAA that could become federal contract towers (FCT) and forty-six FCTs that could be operated by the FAA. Each FCT saves the FAA approximately $1.488 million, so the FAA could save $34.2 million per year by implementing my solutions. I have also established sample criteria for determining which ATCTs could be maintained by the FAA.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

136350-Thumbnail Image.png

Wildlife Strikes at Airports: What are the Contributing Factors?

Description

In the U.S., less than 20 percent of wildlife strikes are reported, which leaves a large portion of incidents unaccounted for. Although wildlife strikes at airports often go unreported, since

In the U.S., less than 20 percent of wildlife strikes are reported, which leaves a large portion of incidents unaccounted for. Although wildlife strikes at airports often go unreported, since the early 1990's the number of wildlife strikes has increased five-fold and the number of damaging strikes has increased 1.5-fold. Goals for this project include determining if biological and landscape variables are good predictors of wildlife strikes. We define response variables as the number of reported wildlife strikes per 10,000 airport operations. We studied seven major airports around Phoenix, Arizona and 30 large airports in the western U.S. In the Phoenix metro valley, airports varied from having 0.3 strikes per year per 10,000 operations to having 14.5 strikes from 2009 to 2013. We determined bird richness by using the citizen-science database "eBird,"and measured species richness within a 15 kilometer area of each airport. Species richness between hotspots ranged from 131 to 320. Seasonal differences were determined using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis for the seven Phoenix metro airports as well as the 30 western U.S. airports. Our results showed that there was a seasonal difference in wildlife strikes in the majority of our airports. We also used land use data from CAP LTER to determine any environmental factors such as vicinity to water or fence line located within five kilometers from airports using ArcGIS. These results are important because they are helpful in determining the factors influencing wildlife strikes based on the number of strikes reported.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

131911-Thumbnail Image.png

PIEDMONT AIRLINES FLIGHT OPERATIONS OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS

Description

This thesis discusses how American Airlines and its’ wholly owned regional partner Piedmont Airlines could improve schedule options by optimizing its existing operations enabling Piedmont to operate more flights with

This thesis discusses how American Airlines and its’ wholly owned regional partner Piedmont Airlines could improve schedule options by optimizing its existing operations enabling Piedmont to operate more flights with the same number of airplanes. This thesis uses data exclusively from Piedmont Airlines’ September 2019 Schedule, and focuses on operational improvements through minimizing downtime for aircraft both at hubs and outstations.

In the hubs, it was found that there was significant room for optimization to ensure that the aircraft are truly being used to their full potential versus long ramp wait times between flights. When looking at outstations, planes typically only spent the minimum required amount of time on the ground. The exception is if the plane was going to Remain Overnight (RON), however this also meant it was the last flight of the day, and it arrived in the evening or later. The thesis specifically looks at the flows for the week of September 14-20, 2019.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Know Go: Developing a Pilot Training Application

Description

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every day, checklists are used from the moment you step into the cockpit until the last light that is turned off at the end of the flight. Checklists are such a significant part of aviation, and several different ways to run a checklist have been created (such as the challenge-response and do-and-tell methods). Despite these variations in checklist usage and procedures, all methods are restricted in terms of user involvement; in other words, pilots are not easily engaged or invested in the checklists that they use in day to day operations. Theorized through exposure to this issue as a student and as a Certified Flight Instructor, Know Go™ has been created as a long term tool to replace conventional checklists with a resourceful one that acts as both a normal checklist for daily use and a learning tool for long term retention. The purpose of this text is to introduce the capabilities of the application, as well as discuss the theories behind the effectiveness of the application. The developmental processes and the challenges associated with application production will also be analyzed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05