Matching Items (4)

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Personality and Belief: Examining the Associations between the Big Five and Philosophy Dichotomy Test

Description

Personality is a relevant and applicable research topic now more than ever; because of the Internet, self-report measures of personality are becoming increasingly accessible. Although now widely available for personal application, personality inventories are not often examined in the context

Personality is a relevant and applicable research topic now more than ever; because of the Internet, self-report measures of personality are becoming increasingly accessible. Although now widely available for personal application, personality inventories are not often examined in the context of their associations with other factors. Specifically, there exists a gap in the research on personality and its associations with philosophical belief. Based on a sample of 88 individuals, correlations between the Big Five and Philosophy Dichotomy Test were examined in order to investigate the associations between personality traits and philosophical belief. Agreeableness was found to be negatively associated with the sensuality, values, metaphysical, and societal axes, corresponding to higher levels of hedonism, rationalism, materialism, and egoism. These findings suggest that personality as measured by the Big Five and philosophical belief are somewhat associated. Limitations and future directions are presented.

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Date Created
2020-05

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Psychometric properties of the Big Five Questionnaire-Children (BFQ-C) in American adolescents

Description

The five-factor model of personality is a conceptual model for describing personality, and represents five traits which are theorized to interact with each other to form personality. The Big Five Questionnaire-Children (BFQ-C) was developed by Barbaranelli, Caprara, Rabasca and Pastorelli

The five-factor model of personality is a conceptual model for describing personality, and represents five traits which are theorized to interact with each other to form personality. The Big Five Questionnaire-Children (BFQ-C) was developed by Barbaranelli, Caprara, Rabasca and Pastorelli (2003) specifically to measure the five factor model in children. The original version was in Italian, but it has subsequently been translated and used in Dutch, German, and Spanish samples. Given that the BFQ-C has support in Europe, obtained in four different languages it seems promising as an assessment of personality for English speaking children and adolescents. The BFQ-C was translated into English utilizing translation and back translation in order to maintain a high conceptual equivalency. The current study utilizes principal components analysis in order to examine the structure of the English language translation of the BFQ-C in a sample of American adolescents. Results indicate that in contrast to the Italian study, findings from this study suggest a six component solution as the most effective interpretation of the data.

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Date Created
2012

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Do People Report the Same Big Five Personality in Social Media and Online Contexts as Offline?

Description

Previous research used the context-free Big Five model of personality traits to predict social media behaviors. The perspective implicit in this research assumes that expression of the Big Five is free of situational context. This thesis challenges this assumption to

Previous research used the context-free Big Five model of personality traits to predict social media behaviors. The perspective implicit in this research assumes that expression of the Big Five is free of situational context. This thesis challenges this assumption to address whether people express the same Big Five on social media as offline. In two studies, this thesis addressed three issues: (1) whether there are self-reported differences in the Big Five between social media/online and offline contexts, (2) whether a five-factor structure replicates in the offline and social media context reports, and (3) whether the predictive validity of the Big Five is the same between offline and social media contexts. College students (total N = 2102) reported their offline and social media Big Five. Main findings reveal that, first, all of the Big Five have lower expressions in social media/online than offline, except for those in the lowest quartile of offline trait expressions; possible explanations include regression towards the mean or the environmental impact of social media. Second, a similar factor structure appeared with openness, extraversion, and neuroticism items being the most robust between offline and social media contexts. However, some conscientiousness and agreeableness items did not apply across offline and social media contexts. Third, the Big Five had different predictive patterns of social media behaviors depending on the context. These findings inform that future research may better serve to specify the context of Big Five expression to understand social media behavior.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020

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Examining Parents’ Personality within a Five Factor Model Predicting Negative and Positive Urgency in Their Adolescent Children

Description

Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency are important subfacets of a propensity to rash action. There is currently limited research on parental antecedents of Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency. The current study investigated whether parent personality and parenting behaviors predict adolescent

Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency are important subfacets of a propensity to rash action. There is currently limited research on parental antecedents of Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency. The current study investigated whether parent personality and parenting behaviors predict adolescent Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency. Data were taken from a community sample with parent personality, positive parenting behaviors, and child Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency measured at separate timepoints. Structural equation models were used to examine whether parent personality predicted adolescent Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency and whether positive parenting mediated this relationship. There was no evidence for a relationship between parent personality and children’s Negative Urgency and Positive Urgency. In addition, there was no relationship between parenting behaviors and child Negative and Positive Urgency in cross-reporter models, but child-reported parenting predicted later adolescent-reported Negative and Positive Urgency. Greater positive parenting, as perceived by children, was related to less Negative and Positive Urgency when they were adolescents. More research is needed to understand whether the current results are due to reporter bias or whether child-perceived parenting behaviors influence the development of adolescent Negative and Positive Urgency.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022