Matching Items (5)

134690-Thumbnail Image.png

Non-Profit Project Evaluation: Kabanana Community School

Description

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders.

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders. Unfortunately, due to finite resources, projects developed and conducted by small international non-governmental organizations (INGO's) are unable to conduct regular evaluations. In this study, I will be conducting an evaluation of a community school project completed by an INGO in order to gauge the project's impact in the community. The evaluation includes a review of previously published literature on the subject, as well as survey data that was gathered to gauge the project's impact. The results of this study found not only that the community school students were beating both the district and national average in examination scores, but also that 100% of students in attendance planned on completing some form of higher education. Furthermore, a majority of the enrolled students would not have had access to alternate forms of education without the community school. For these reasons, the project appears to be meeting all of its current objectives. The evaluation produced several strong recommendations for the school's future improvement such as continuous benchmarking and self-evaluation, increased focus on shifting towards self-sustainability, and an overall improvement of its current facilities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135825-Thumbnail Image.png

Stepping Out of the Bubble: A Study on Meaningful Cultural Engagement While Studying Abroad

Description

Inspired by my own experiences, I began this study to examine students' cultural engagement while studying abroad. Students' motivations to study abroad vastly vary and no two experiences are the

Inspired by my own experiences, I began this study to examine students' cultural engagement while studying abroad. Students' motivations to study abroad vastly vary and no two experiences are the same, due to the multitude of factors involved. Study abroad program providers and organizations frequently cite intercultural competence as a vital skill in the 21st century for all young professionals to build, and is often a goal of students to develop through their study abroad experiences. Before departure, some students may have a romanticized, grand vision of integrating themselves in a foreign culture and learning the language. Upon arrival, reality may prove to be quite different and students can get swept up in the novelty of living in a new environment and traveling with their new American friends from the same program. The vision of intercultural competence and foreign language acquisition gradually fades when realizing just how difficult they both are to achieve, especially in such a short time period. My hope is that this study can highlight issues that returned students of study abroad programs faced while abroad and can provide valuable insight for future study abroad participants into how to become more immersed in their host culture. By creating awareness of the merits of intercultural competence and the methods to develop it through study abroad, future students can become better equipped to have a more enriching experience. https://cultureasustudyabroad.wordpress.com/

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

131849-Thumbnail Image.png

Evaluating the Impact of the Tempe Sister Cities International Youth Exchange Program on Participants’ Sustained Global Engagement

Description

This study examines the impact of international youth exchange on past participants’ global engagement through the lens of their academic, professional, and personal development post-exchange. Through a quantitative survey, as

This study examines the impact of international youth exchange on past participants’ global engagement through the lens of their academic, professional, and personal development post-exchange. Through a quantitative survey, as well as interviews conducted with alumni, this research explores the ways in which international exchange alumni felt as though their exchange impacted - or did not impact - their future academic, career, and personal choices. Furthermore, this study investigates the dynamics and practices of the specific organization of study, Tempe Sister Cities, and provides information regarding strengths and areas for improvement based upon feedback from study participants. This research builds upon existing literature on international exchange outcomes through its long-term perspective and evaluation of a Sister Cities affiliate, which is an organization previously omitted from international exchange impact evaluations. The study finds that while international exchange experiences may not contribute to overt, direct influences on the fields and industries in which alumni choose to study and work, the exchange produces long-lasting impacts through the skills alumni acquire in intellectual curiosity, job readiness, and other areas of personal and professional development.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

157714-Thumbnail Image.png

An Inquiry into PYP Transdisciplinary Understanding in Two Remote Schools in Indonesia

Description

This research investigates teachers' understanding of and feelings about transdisciplinary education and the International Baccalaureate's Primary Years Programme (PYP) as utilized by two remote schools in the province of Papua,

This research investigates teachers' understanding of and feelings about transdisciplinary education and the International Baccalaureate's Primary Years Programme (PYP) as utilized by two remote schools in the province of Papua, Indonesia on the island of New Guinea. A goal of transdisciplinary education is to make learning through inquiry authentic, broad, student-centered, and relevant to the real world. In this study I examine educators’ perspectives of how transdisciplinary education is manifested in the two different and yet related elementary schools.

Both schools are supported by a multinational mining company. One school is for expatriate students and the language of instruction is English. The second school, which is for Indonesian students, follows the Indonesian National Curriculum of 2013, with instruction delivered in the Indonesian language by Indonesian teachers. A single expatriate superintendent oversees both schools.

Teacher experience, teacher PYP experience, implications of the PYP framework, cultural implications of the location, and demographics of the school stakeholders were considerations of this research. To acquire data, homeroom teachers, specialist teachers (music, art, physical education, and language), administrators, and PYP coordinators completed a survey and were interviewed. Additional data were collected through document examination and observation.

A broad range of experience with transdisciplinary education existed in both schools, contributing to some confusion about how to implement the PYP framework and varying conceptions of what constitutes transdisciplinary education. Principles of the PYP were evident in curriculum documents and planning and discussed by the teachers in both schools. Educators at the expatriate school identified with the international-mindedness and approaches to learning in the PYP. Educators at the national school valued to character education elements of the PYP, which they viewed as consistent with Indonesian principles of pancasila. The mission and vision statements of the schools in this study aligned with the PYP in different ways. Challenges faced by educators in these schools are acquisition of professional development, experienced teachers and teaching materials due to the remote location of the schools. While transdisciplinary education was described, it was not necessarily implemented. The findings of this study suggest that transdisciplinary education is a mindset that takes time, experience, and commitment to implement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

154727-Thumbnail Image.png

Education abroad as a catalyst for impactful global development: the global impact of the missing focus on the re-entry phase

Description

Education abroad participants worldwide are often positively transformed by their experiences and, as a result, gain a great deal of knowledge, resources, ideas, and high levels of inspiration which can

Education abroad participants worldwide are often positively transformed by their experiences and, as a result, gain a great deal of knowledge, resources, ideas, and high levels of inspiration which can positively impact the individual, and local and global communities—contributing to global development. However, education abroad participants face challenges and are often not prepared for making lasting positive change in their local and global communities post-education abroad, known as the reentry phase. Moreover, they do not fully understand the potential positive impacts they can have on society as a result of their education abroad experiences. This is of significant importance for a world that continues to rapidly globalize, advance technologically faster than ever before, and faces challenges and opportunities that require globally experienced people. Through surveys and interviews with 156 participants from 32 countries, this transformative mixed methods research provides strong evidence for the high levels of benefits participants gain, and how they are positively transformed and motivated to make local and global impacts after their education abroad experiences. The data provides insights into participant perceptions, ideas, opportunities, and challenges surrounding these topics, and identifies differences and similarities in participant and program types that best prepare, support, and enable participants during the re-entry phase. It also provides insights on how stakeholders (e.g. educational, public, private, non-governmental, civil society, and personal support systems) can transform current research, models, and policies to be able to support participants in becoming social entrepreneur change agents, and forge a more holistic approach towards global education mobility and global development. The more than 4.5 million people that currently engage in education abroad annually is a population projected to increase to more than 8 million participants by 2025. They represent only 0.06% of the world’s 7 billion population from almost all countries, including developing, emerging, and highly developed. Therefore, this unique population of highly educated and globally exposed future world leaders and decision-makers represents a comparatively uniquely privileged group that have the potential (and responsibility) to make important global development impacts after their education abroad experiences.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016