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There is surprisingly little scientific literature describing whether a hockey slap shot positively or negatively transfers to a driving golf swing. Golf and hockey use a similar kinematic sequence to send the ball / puck towards a target, but does that directly translate to positive skill transfer between the two

There is surprisingly little scientific literature describing whether a hockey slap shot positively or negatively transfers to a driving golf swing. Golf and hockey use a similar kinematic sequence to send the ball / puck towards a target, but does that directly translate to positive skill transfer between the two sports, or are there other important factors that could result in a negative skill transfer? The aim of this study is to look further into the two kinematic sequences and determine their intertask skill transfer type. A field experiment was conducted, following a specific research design, in order to compare performance between two groups, one being familiar with the skill that may transfer (hockey slapshot) and the other group being unfamiliar. Both groups had no experience in the skill being tested (driving golf swing) and various data was collected as all of the subjects performed 10 golf swings. The results of the data analysis showed that the group with experience in hockey had a higher variability of ball distance and ball speed. There are many factors of a hockey slapshot that are likely to develop a negative intertask skill transfer, resulting in this group's high inconsistency when performing a golf swing. On the other hand, the group with hockey experience also had higher mean club speed, showing that some aspects of the hockey slapshot resulted in a positive skill transfer, aiding their ability to perform a golf swing.

ContributorsLarson, Finn Althea (Author) / Peterson, Daniel (Thesis director) / Cryer, Michael (Committee member) / Materials Science and Engineering Program (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2021-05
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The 1980 Winter Olympic semi-final hockey game between the United States and Soviet Union changed the history of sporting events. The outcome took everyone by surprise, and it reinvigorated patriotism in the United States. It was and forever will be known as a miracle. The hockey game has only grown

The 1980 Winter Olympic semi-final hockey game between the United States and Soviet Union changed the history of sporting events. The outcome took everyone by surprise, and it reinvigorated patriotism in the United States. It was and forever will be known as a miracle. The hockey game has only grown in popularity due to movies, books, and articles reminiscing on one of the greatest sports upsets in history. The United States-Russia rivalry has been a strong one since the very beginning of sports. The United States has always tried to keep up with the Russian talent, but in 1980 they took the Soviets by surprise, at height of the cold war. Not only were they rivals in sports, but enemies at a profound political level. Over the years, the tensions between the two countries have diminished, but recently they have increased again. Although these tensions continue to rise, these countries are able to battle for the top seed through sports. This has been shown throughout the years with one of the main competitions being the 1980 Winter Olympics semi-final hockey game.

Created2021-05
Description

The following creative project defends that, whether intentionally or not, mental illness and substance abuse are inevitably romanticized in young adult media and discusses the dangers of this romanticization. This project is divided into three parts. The first part consists of psychological evaluations of the main characters of two popular,

The following creative project defends that, whether intentionally or not, mental illness and substance abuse are inevitably romanticized in young adult media and discusses the dangers of this romanticization. This project is divided into three parts. The first part consists of psychological evaluations of the main characters of two popular, contemporary forms of young adult media, Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger and Euphoria by Sam Levinson. These evaluations use textual evidence and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) to determine what symptoms of psychopathology the characters appear to display. The second part consists of a self-written short story that is meant to accurately depict the life of a young adult struggling with mental illness and substance abuse. This story contains various aesthetic techniques borrowed from the two young adult media forms. The final part consists of an aesthetic statement which discusses in depth the aesthetic techniques employed within the short story, Quicksand by Anisha Mehra.

ContributorsMehra, Anisha (Author) / Cryer, Michael (Thesis director) / Cavanaugh Toft, Carolyn (Committee member) / Department of Psychology (Contributor) / Dean, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2021-05
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Description
On Nov. 18, 2014, the Arizona State University announced its club hockey team would be elevated from club to varsity status begin in 2015-16. ASU's process lasted merely four months, spring-boarding off a July article that quoted athletic director Ray Anderson as saying all the program needed was money in

On Nov. 18, 2014, the Arizona State University announced its club hockey team would be elevated from club to varsity status begin in 2015-16. ASU's process lasted merely four months, spring-boarding off a July article that quoted athletic director Ray Anderson as saying all the program needed was money in order to make happen. This thesis explains what happened between that July story and the November announcement. Almost immediately the school received calls from interested donors who said they were willing to completely fund the creation of a men's hockey program. In the end, a group led by Milwaukee businessman Don Mullett donated $32 million to ASU. The thesis also explains the challenges that are still to come for ASU. Those include the arena in which ASU will play, the conference it will join, the women's sport ASU will add in order to stay compliant with Title IX and whether the program will be profitable for the University, among other things. ASU will begin play as a Division I program, the southernmost and westernmost school in the continental United States. It truly is, as Anderson wanted, an example of ASU being "entrepreneurial."
ContributorsEmerson, Justin Charles (Author) / McGuire, Tim (Thesis director) / Anderson, Doug (Committee member) / School of Politics and Global Studies (Contributor) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2015-05
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Description

This thesis project consists of 2 key components, a marketing brand book for the ASU Division I ice hockey team and an in-depth narrative of both the team’s history and why each decision was made for the brand book itself. The brand book consists of four main sections: team history,

This thesis project consists of 2 key components, a marketing brand book for the ASU Division I ice hockey team and an in-depth narrative of both the team’s history and why each decision was made for the brand book itself. The brand book consists of four main sections: team history, visual guidelines, social media, and public relations. The team history tells the story of how the program formed and grew into the NCAA Division I team they are today. The history then goes into detail discussing the coach, Greg Powers, and his ASU hockey journey as well as how he developed the club program and has coached/recruited the team to success. This section also highlights ASU’s first national breakout player, Joey Daccord, who became the first player from ASU to play a game in the NHL. Other than the team history, each section contains multiple goals for the marketing team to achieve as well as rules and guidelines to assist them with achieving these goals. All of ASU’s current brand rules and guidelines are included within the visual guidelines section of the brand book, allowing for all Sun Devil hockey marketing efforts to properly resemble and embody Arizona State University as a whole. The Public Relations section covers how to positively get the team in the news through service and community events and embody ASU’s commitment to service. The Public Relations section also covers how ASU hockey is to respond in a PR crisis and the importance of gathering all the information and then publicly addressing the situation. The social media section of the brand book lists all goals, target audience, and methods of achieving the goals for each current platform ASU hockey has (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram) and the frequency of posting required.

ContributorsScola, Sean Christopher (Author) / Lynch, John (Thesis director) / Pierce, John (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2019-12
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Ice hockey is a minority sport in New Zealand, but many people are dedicating their lives to grow its popularity in the country. Hockey in Kiwi Land: Exploring the Ice Hockey Culture of New Zealand presents the voices of those involved in the country’s largest city, Auckland, and their efforts

Ice hockey is a minority sport in New Zealand, but many people are dedicating their lives to grow its popularity in the country. Hockey in Kiwi Land: Exploring the Ice Hockey Culture of New Zealand presents the voices of those involved in the country’s largest city, Auckland, and their efforts in the country’s highest league. The New Zealand Ice Hockey League is made up of people of different backgrounds, including fathers, teenagers, university students, full-time workers, and Canadians. Information on ice hockey’s culture was found through spending a week in Auckland and interviewing different people involved with the West Auckland Admirals, the defending champion at the time. The information was then created into a website that displays both a written and visual component. The photo stories were made to capture the physical aspect of a game that wants to dominate in a country obsessed with rugby. The interviews capture why those born in New Zealand love ice hockey and what needs to change to promote the sport better. Many in the league came from ice hockey haven Canada, and they provided insight on the differences they noticed between New Zealand and North America. The project taught me more about New Zealand’s ice hockey programs and how they differ from those in North America. The interviews showed that while the sport will be a minority in the country for the next few years, it will continue to grow through the joint efforts of international and New Zealand-born players giving back.
ContributorsOrtiz, Jenna (Author) / Kurland, Brett (Thesis director) / Reed, Sada (Committee member) / Historical, Philosophical & Religious Studies (Contributor) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2020-05
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Description
The National Hockey League is the highest league of hockey in the world. They have the highest attendance percentage out of the four major sports in North America (National Football League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball). However, the NHL is lacking insurmountably in the media rights revenue space compared

The National Hockey League is the highest league of hockey in the world. They have the highest attendance percentage out of the four major sports in North America (National Football League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball). However, the NHL is lacking insurmountably in the media rights revenue space compared to these other three major sports leagues in the United States. This paper is designed to find innovative solutions to remedy this problem, by incorporating the new Puck and Player Tracking technology into the television and streaming broadcasts. We first identified the core values of fans and their consumption habits and behaviors. We obtained an interview with the Senior Hockey Writer for ESPN, Greg Wyshynski, on the development and implementation of Puck and Player Tracking technology. From there, we created a survey to gauge the consumer perception of the Puck and Player Tracking technology, which allowed us to perform analytical tests to determine the best possible implementation strategy for the PPT technology into broadcasts. Using statistical testing methods, we identified that survey respondents found the least invasive augmented broadcast element was a small, gray puck trail displayed on the ice. From these findings, we proposed that the ideal implementation of the Puck and Player Tracking technology into television broadcasts should feature this element in all future traditional NHL television broadcasts and the player statistical broadcast should be offered as a second screen streamed broadcast. This implementation, compounded with other factors in the upcoming NHL media rights negotiations, creates a more valuable television product, which in turn will lead to a more competitive media rights deal.
ContributorsDiluchio, Ryan Patrick (Author) / McIntosh, Daniel (Thesis director) / Eaton, John (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2020-05
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Description
The goal of our project was to determine how to create the most marketable hockey team. To do this, consumer needs, team psychology, and financing were all researched and evaluated. With this information, a business plan was designed around the next NHL expansion team. Two surveys, one for marketing distributed

The goal of our project was to determine how to create the most marketable hockey team. To do this, consumer needs, team psychology, and financing were all researched and evaluated. With this information, a business plan was designed around the next NHL expansion team. Two surveys, one for marketing distributed to the general public, and one for team psychology distributed to current and former hockey players were created and sent out, while data for the financing aspect was collected by comparing data from other NHL teams and franchises from different sports. In terms of financials, this comes in lower than average ticket prices, a nice and expensive stadium, the ideal city to generate capital, and sufficient money spent on advertising. Our ticket prices of $140 is based on having a low enough price to generate lots of demand while high enough to make a profit. The $600 million stadium (which will be fully funded) will surely draw a significant crowd. Choosing Seattle as a city is the most ideal to meet these goals and lastly, in meeting with an NHL GM, we determined $4 million in yearly advertising costs as sufficient in creating the most marketable team. Throughout this whole process, we remained data focus. We focused on data from a customized marketing survey, organizational structures, salary cap, and attendance. What our marketing survey results showed us is that our potential fans wanted three characteristics in a hockey team: speed, intensity, and scoring. In looking at organizational structures teams that exemplified these characteristics had a heavy emphasis on development and scouting. So we built our organizational tree around those two ideals. We hired GM Mike Futa, a current director of player personnel for the L.A. Kings, and Head Coach Adam Oates, a current skills development coach for top players to bring those ideals to fruition. In constructing our team we replicated the rules set forth for the Vegas Knights' expansion draft and hypothesized a likely protected list based off of last years lists. As a result we were able to construct a team that statistically out performed the Vegas Knights draft numbers by double, in goals, assists, and points, while also beating them in PIM. Based off of these numbers and an analysis of how goals translate into game attendance we are confident that we have constructed a team that has the highest potential for marketability. For the team psychology area, when creating a roster and scouting players, some of our main findings were that it is important to pursue players who get along well with their teammates and coaching staff, are aggressive, are leaders on the team, and are vocal players who communicate effectively. We also recommended avoiding players who significantly portrayed any "pet-peeve" traits, with the most emphasis placed on "disrespectful toward teammates," and the least emphasis placed on "over-aggression." By following all of these recommendations, we believe the most marketable hockey team possible can be created.
ContributorsQuinn, Colin Christopher (Co-author) / Spigel, Carlos (Co-author) / Meyer, Matt (Co-author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / McIntosh, Daniel (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law (Contributor) / Department of Management and Entrepreneurship (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2018-05
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My thesis project is a 26 minute 46 second film that documents the Arizona State hockey team's first season as an NCAA Division I program. ASU hockey was formerly a club team that competed in the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA), but that all changed in the fall of 2014

My thesis project is a 26 minute 46 second film that documents the Arizona State hockey team's first season as an NCAA Division I program. ASU hockey was formerly a club team that competed in the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA), but that all changed in the fall of 2014 after the program received a donation. The documentary explores the significance of the team, the emotion of the players and staff, and the results of the season.
ContributorsCasillas, Mauricio (Author) / Kurland, Brett (Thesis director) / Reed, Sada (Committee member) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2016-05
Description

I decided to combine my passion for music production/performance with my studies in Psychology to create this EP for my thesis project. I was able to write, record, and produce the project from my home using in-home recording equipment and software. The EP is comprised of five songs, each representing

I decided to combine my passion for music production/performance with my studies in Psychology to create this EP for my thesis project. I was able to write, record, and produce the project from my home using in-home recording equipment and software. The EP is comprised of five songs, each representing its own psychological disorder. The purpose of the project was to make conversations about mental health more accessible and to encourage the art community to address taboo topics through artistic mediums. Attached is the written portion of my thesis, the EP cover, and MP3's of the songs. The EP "Rocky" can be streamed on all streaming platforms under my artist name "Sydney Cramer". The track list is below: 1. Illusion- PTSD 2. Thunder- Bipolar I Disorder 3. Castle- Generalized Anxiety Disorder 4. Baby Blue- Postpartum Depression 5. Pity Party- Major Depressive Disorder

ContributorsCramer, Sydney (Author) / Dombrowski, Rosemarie (Thesis director) / Cavanaugh-Toft, Carolyn (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics (Contributor) / Department of Psychology (Contributor)
Created2023-05