Matching Items (12)

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The analysis of reverse tandem running of Temnothorax rugatulus colonies

Description

Collective decision making in social organism societies involves a large network of communication systems. Studying the processes behind the transmission of information allows for greater understanding of the decision making

Collective decision making in social organism societies involves a large network of communication systems. Studying the processes behind the transmission of information allows for greater understanding of the decision making capabilities of a group. For Temnothorax rugatulus colonies, information is commonly spread in the form of tandem running, a linear recruitment pattern where a leading ant uses a short-ranged pheromone to direct a following ant to a target location (in tandem).The observed phenomenon of reverse tandem running (RTR), where a follower is lead from a target back to the home nest, has not been as extensively studied as forward tandem running and transportation recruitment activities. This study seeks to explain a potential reason for the presence of the RTR behavior; more specifically, the study explores the idea that reverse tandem run followers are being shown a specific route to the home nest by a highly experienced and efficient leading ant. Ten colonies had migrations induced experimentally in order to generate some reverse tandem running activity. Once an RTR has been observed, the follower and leader were studied for behavior and their pathways were analyzed. It was seen that while RTR paths were quite efficient (1.4x a straight line distance), followers did not experience a statistically significant improvement in their pathways between the home and target nests (based on total distance traveled) when compared to similar non-RTR ants. Further, RTR leading ants were no more efficient than other non-RTR ants. It was observed that some followers began recruiting after completion of an RTR, but the number than changed their behavior was not significant. Thus, the results of this experiment cannot conclusively show that RTR followers are utilizing reverse tandem runs to improve their routes between the home and target nests.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

Narratives of Recruitment: A Comparative Analysis of ISIS and the USMC

Description

The United States is attempting to find the most efficient ways of responding to the threat of terrorist recruitment within its borders. ISIS has effectively recruited individuals from around the

The United States is attempting to find the most efficient ways of responding to the threat of terrorist recruitment within its borders. ISIS has effectively recruited individuals from around the world on a large scale and specifically targets citizens of Western countries with high-quality, cinematic, English-language recruitment material. In the following analysis, we propose an additional approach to understanding ISIS recruitment appeal by comparing the content of recruitment messaging from a militaristic (but value-oriented) organization that is familiar to the authors of this thesis (the United States Marine Corps) with the militaristic but value-oriented unfamiliar (ISIS). Through this analysis, we seek to understand ISIS recruitment not from a theological basis but from a communications framework: narrative analysis. We identified narratives in each organization's recruitment materials and, by comparing larger themes that appeared across materials, determined the overarching narrative arc for each organization (into which the many smaller individual narratives were tied). We found that the narratives of the organizations are similar and different in many ways, but most significantly, they articulate fundamentally different resolutions: ISIS is driving towards a defined narrative resolution (which results in the end of the modern world) while the USMC recruitment materials depict no concrete resolution, as the organizational arc is depicted as continuing throughout time. Our discussion of narrative trajectory and defined resolutions directly supports existing scholarly literature linking the need for cognitive closure with extremist views: providing certainty and assurance about the future to potential extremist recruits. As demonstrated in our analysis, the narratives produced by ISIS for the purpose of recruitment depict a definite and conclusive resolution to both individual and organizational narratives, removing ambiguity (of actions, of antagonists, and of resolutions) and the anxiety associated with chance from the lives of the potential recruits. We believe ISIS's removal of uncertainty and provided template for how individuals should conduct their lives is an important part of the appeal its recruitment material has for Western recruits. Our suggestions for real-world use of our findings apply the immediacy and defined resolution found in ISIS recruitment narratives to counter ISIS-recruitment strategies.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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From Campus to Workplace: Effectively Recruiting the Best College Talent

Description

Purpose: This thesis studies the effectiveness of various recruitment strategies directed towards college students in the interest of acquiring the best talent for internships and full-time career opportunities after graduation.

Purpose: This thesis studies the effectiveness of various recruitment strategies directed towards college students in the interest of acquiring the best talent for internships and full-time career opportunities after graduation. The purpose of this thesis is to develop an understanding about what current students respond to when it comes to efforts companies make to recruit for employment and then to provide suggestions to improve recruitment strategies. Methodology: In addition to research of existing literature, a survey was given to students at Arizona State University, in order to determine students' reactions to recruitment strategies used by companies. Differences in reactions will be examined by talent, as well as position, gender, school of discipline, and age. Findings: Through the research conducted, I found that personalized efforts are not necessarily always preferred by students. Mass efforts, such as career fairs and job postings, hold a lot of weight and influence in a decision. Two personalized recruitment efforts that should be noted are interaction with the HR team and direct emails. Reputation also plays a significant part in the recruitment of students on campus. Establishing a well-known and liked reputation within the different areas of reputation is vital to the recruitment of students.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Mechanisms of Emigration During Ant Inter-Colony Conflict

Description

Much like neighboring nations, living in close proximity can often lead to conflict over limited resources for social insect colonies. As with warring nations, conflicts among insect societies can also

Much like neighboring nations, living in close proximity can often lead to conflict over limited resources for social insect colonies. As with warring nations, conflicts among insect societies can also result in one colony attempting to invade the other. Though emigrations are common and well understood in social insects, the process of emigration in the context of conflict is not known. During emigrations of the ant Temnothorax rugatulus, colonies first employ the use of scouts, who search for new nest locations. These scouts then recruit naïve workers to these nests resulting in a ‘voting’ process through which colonies can collectively choose the best nest site. Once the decision is made, the selected nest is rapidly populated by workers who physically carry the queen(s), brood, and remaining naïve ants to the new nest. Invasions occurring during inter-colony conflicts bear a striking resemblance to this process. The state of the final nest suggested merged colonies, and statistical models were used to test for the likelihood of this. Here we test whether colonies of T. rugatulus use the same mechanisms during invasions as those used in emigrations by observing conflicts between colonies of T. rugatulus ants and tracking instances of scouting and recruitment, transport and changes in populations in each nest. Our results support the predicted order of behaviors starting with scouting, followed by recruitment and transport last. In addition, presence of the quorum rule, which determines the switch from recruitment to transport, is confirmed. Furthermore, evidence showed that the colonies were merged at the time of transport. While ant emigration patterns are well understood, there is a gap in understanding conflict driven emigrations/invasions. Our results serve to better understand conflict in social insects by further understanding the mechanisms used during conflicts.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Sell Them Mothafuckin' Hoes a Dream"" \u2014 A Look Into the Business Structure Behind Recruitment and Retention in Sex Trafficking

Description

Sex trafficking in the United States is an enormous illegal underground business economy that involves the sexual exploitation of many persons. Due to the large nature of the sex

Sex trafficking in the United States is an enormous illegal underground business economy that involves the sexual exploitation of many persons. Due to the large nature of the sex trafficking business and the many different types of sex trafficking, it is helpful for social workers, government agencies, and activists to understand the intricacies of the various types of sex trafficking. This research focused on determining the human resources business structures behind pimp businesses that relied on mental coercion of the victim. The data source used, Pimpfeet.com—an online pimp authored blog—provided data from actual pimps on their business practices that were analyzed to determine trends in recruitment and retention. These trends were compared to human resource management theories from business literature to determine to what extent, or if at all, a pimp’s business recruited and retained workers in a way that was similar to how a legal business would, according to human resources strategies. The data extracted from Pimpfeet.com and used in this study consisted of 69 pimp quotes that were put into three recruitment categories and five retention categories based on human resource management literature in order to see which categories were used for recruitment and retention by pimps. This study found that pimp recruitment and retention followed, to some extent, the same models described in the human resource management literature, with slight modifications. This study showed that job embeddedness theory (Holtom, Mitchel and Lee, 2009) was able to explain much of why sex trafficking victims are retained so well by pimps since they are so embedded in the prostitution lifestyle. These findings show the different business techniques that pimps use for recruitment and retention of sex workers and are useful for understanding how a social worker, government entity or an activist can combat these forces to help remove victims from a pimp’s control, or keep victims from getting recruited in the first place. Further areas of research related to this topic were suggested.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Cost Analysis of Participant Recruitment at a Community Site to Promote Colon Cancer Screening in Underserved Populations

Description

A cost analysis was done on the participant recruitment for an ongoing research project to promote colon cancer screening in Phoenix, Arizona. The aim of the 5-year project is to

A cost analysis was done on the participant recruitment for an ongoing research project to promote colon cancer screening in Phoenix, Arizona. The aim of the 5-year project is to navigate people, who do not regularly see primary care physicians, from the community to a nearby clinic to be screened, using an intervention strategy called tailored navigation. Through tailored navigation, participants' barriers to being screened are addressed by Community Health Navigators, who call the participant over the span of 8 weeks following an initial class at a community site and give them information on how to overcome his or her specific barrier. The objective of this cost analysis is to explore the costs of recruiting a participant from the community to the initial class to a potential program manager. The process of recruitment involved recruitment of a community site, project introduction, the sign-up of interested participants, eligibility, baseline, and consent tests, and the class itself. A Community Site Liaison recruits sites and schedules class times. The Community Health Navigator conducts eligibility, baseline, and consent surveys and teaches the class, a sixty minute presentation on colon cancer screening. The cost of recruitment per community site was $541.23, and the cost per participant attending class was estimated to be $1,594.41 per participant with variation between $1,379.97 and $1,770.71 in optimistic and conservative scenarios, respectively.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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COMMUNITY WITH OPPORTUNITY: ADVERTISING THE W. P. CAREY LEADERS ACADEMY AND THE EXPERIENCE OF BUSINESS STUDENTS IN BARRETT, THE HONORS COLLEGE

Description

The following paper is a proposal for marketing materials advertising the W. P. Carey Leaders Academy and the experience of business students in Barrett, The Honors College. There is a

The following paper is a proposal for marketing materials advertising the W. P. Carey Leaders Academy and the experience of business students in Barrett, The Honors College. There is a distinct need for materials that market to and inform prospective students about the experiences and feeling of community that can be attained from being a student in the W. P. Carey Leaders Academy, which is "a community designed exclusively for premier students enrolled in the W. P. Carey School of Business" (W. P. Carey Leaders Academy). The challenge of successfully creating these materials was approached with various methods of data collection and research. The data collection included a review of Arizona State University (ASU), the W. P. Carey School of Business, and Barrett, The Honors College marketing materials, a review of materials from competing institutions, and scholarly articles on the subject of recruitment and marketing. Admission-based data from groups of excelling students was featured. Finally, interviews and surveys with current faculty, staff, and students were conducted to supplement the research and data collection. Analysis of the data provided insight into best practices when marketing from universities and provided an understanding of appropriate methods for marketing this information. The data indicated that creating an online viewbook, like the one currently marketing the entire business school, as well as providing a physical postcard mailer directing students to the online viewbook, would be the best strategy for marketing the W. P. Carey Leaders Academy. The sections of the viewbook this paper proposes to include are Why the W. P. Carey Leaders Academy, W. P. Carey Leaders Academy Experience, Student Life, Academic Success, Involvement, Scholarship, Professional Future, Barrett, The Honors College, For Parents, and Next Steps. Details of the Time, Cost, and Project Personnel follow.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Diversity and Inclusion Recruitment in Big Four Public Accounting

Description

Inclusion of diverse talent in the field of public accounting has been highly prioritized by the profession since the late 1960s. In seeking to acquire racially/ethnically diverse talent in addition

Inclusion of diverse talent in the field of public accounting has been highly prioritized by the profession since the late 1960s. In seeking to acquire racially/ethnically diverse talent in addition to an expanding set of identities (e.g. veterans, people with disabilities, LGTBQ+, and various backgrounds contributing to “diversity of thought”), Big Four Public Accounting firms have taken on more operational ownership of their Diversity and Inclusion programming. We conducted interviews with D&I program facilitators and surveyed Accounting and Finance students at Arizona State University to assess whether these programs align with students’ outlooks and are being properly presented to enhance awareness. The uniformity across the Big Four’s D&I program structures, the persistence in competition among them in relation to talent acquisition and retention, and students’ lack of awareness relating to program timing and existence lead us to conclude that efforts in improving diversity and inclusion in Big Four Public Accounting are most effective when the Big Four act collectively

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  • 2020-05

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A recruit's dilemma: collective decision-making and information content in the ant Temnothorax rugatulus

Description

An insect society needs to share information about important resources in order to collectively exploit them. This task poses a dilemma if the colony must consider multiple resource types, such

An insect society needs to share information about important resources in order to collectively exploit them. This task poses a dilemma if the colony must consider multiple resource types, such as food and nest sites. How does it allocate workers appropriately to each resource, and how does it adapt its recruitment communication to the specific needs of each resource type? In this dissertation, I investigate these questions in the ant Temnothorax rugatulus.

In Chapter 1, I summarize relevant past work on food and nest recruitment. Then I describe T. rugatulus and its recruitment behavior, tandem running, and I explain its suitability for these questions. In Chapter 2, I investigate whether food and nest recruiters behave differently. I report two novel behaviors used by recruiters during their interaction with nestmates. Food recruiters perform these behaviors more often than nest recruiters, suggesting that they convey information about target type. In Chapter 3, I investigate whether colonies respond to a tradeoff between foraging and emigration by allocating their workforce adaptively. I describe how colonies responded when I posed a tradeoff by manipulating colony need for food and shelter and presenting both resources simultaneously. Recruitment and visitation to each target partially matched the predictions of the tradeoff hypothesis. In Chapter 4, I address the tuned error hypothesis, which states that the error rate in recruitment is adaptively tuned to the patch area of the target. Food tandem leaders lost followers at a higher rate than nest tandem leaders. This supports the tuned error hypothesis, because food targets generally have larger patch areas than nest targets with small entrances.

This work shows that animal groups face tradeoffs as individual animals do. It also suggests that colonies spatially allocate their workforce according to resource type. Investigating recruitment for multiple resource types gives a better understanding of exploitation of each resource type, how colonies make collective decisions under conflicting goals, as well as how colonies manage the exploitation of multiple types of resources differently. This has implications for managing the health of economically important social insects such as honeybees or invasive fire ants.

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Date Created
  • 2019

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Government, God and Family: A Multi-Modal Analysis of Stories and Storytelling in an Online Social Movement

Description

This study explores the online recruitment and mobilization of followers in a social movement. In this study, I identify and analyze how certain narratives were produced, distributed and recirculated online

This study explores the online recruitment and mobilization of followers in a social movement. In this study, I identify and analyze how certain narratives were produced, distributed and recirculated online by a social movement organization that depicted players in the movement in ways that engaged followers in actions of advocacy and support. Also, I examine how particular narratives were taken up, negotiated, amplified, and distributed by online supporters who eventually become co-tellers of the narrative and ultimately advocates on behalf of the social movement. By examining a selection of media statements, open letters, protest speeches, blogs, videos and pictures, I show how online practices might contribute to inspiring and mobilizing action or responses from a large number of followers. Data include selected excerpts from an online social movement that began in Norway in 2015 and later gathered momentum and strength outside of Norway and Europe. This multi-modal analysis of digital practices demonstrates how collaboratively produced narratives (e.g., of suffering, sorrow, persecution or resilience) emerge and gain traction in the digital space, the relationship between the temporal and spatial dimensions of narrative, and the role of collective memory in building a sense of community and shared identity. Demonstrating the dialogic and interactional dimensions of meaning-making processes, this case study informs how we might theorize and understand the role of identity and narrative in the emergence and amplification of social movements.

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Date Created
  • 2019