Matching Items (14)

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Acquisition of Zero Anaphora by English Speaking Learners of L2 Chinese

Description

With an increasing global interest in Chinese economics and society, more and more native English speakers have started to learn Chinese as a second language (L2). While English and Chinese

With an increasing global interest in Chinese economics and society, more and more native English speakers have started to learn Chinese as a second language (L2). While English and Chinese share a similar word order at the syntactic level, they differ significantly in ways to keep track of reference at the discourse level. There are generally three ways to keep track of reference: repeating the full noun phrase (NP), replacing the full NP with a lexical pronoun, or omitting the NP using zero anaphora. Chinese, a topic-prominent language, allows a wide use of zero anaphora to maintain reference; whereas English, a subject-prominent language, allows only a limited use of zero anaphora. Due to this difference, Chinese as a second language learners whose native language is English (CSL learners), must learn to implement the use of zero anaphora more frequently in their Chinese discourse. The purpose of this study is to investigate how CSL learners keep track of reference using zero anaphora. It is hypothesized that CSL learners at intermediate proficiency level would display a transfer effect from English to Chinese in their Chinese discourse. Specifically, they would produce fewer zero anaphora than native Chinese speakers, and they would also tend to consider discourse with many uses of zero anaphora for reference tracking as less appropriate. To test the hypothesis, a story-retelling task and multiple-choice questions task were adopted. The results of both tasks supported the hypothesis. Meanwhile, it is also evident that the CSL learners have acquired some usage of zero anaphora in their Chinese discourse as the usage of zero anaphora was more frequent when speaking Chinese than English.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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New Phoenix Museum of Chinese Heritage and Cultural Center

Description

Major cities in the US such as Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago have a rich cultural hub within the realm of central business district known as the Chinatown where

Major cities in the US such as Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago have a rich cultural hub within the realm of central business district known as the Chinatown where large Chinese communities reside. These districts are usually located in or around the neighborhoods where the first Chinese immigrants settled. Though Phoenix has had a Chinese community since the mid-nineteenth century, the historic and contemporary community is represented by a commercial retail center which is distant from the sites where the initial immigrants resided. Using a both textual and mapping research I explored the history of the development of Phoenix and contributions which Chinese culture made to the process. In the course of my research I learned that city of Phoenix not only had one Chinatown but two Chinatowns. My project examines the influence of Chinese culture on the urban development of Phoenix throughout history and contemporary era and reintroduces the presence of this community within the urban context of Phoenix through the creation of a cultural center. Political unrest in the Guangdong region in Southern China during the 1870s combined with both the California Gold Rush (1848 - 1850 and the construction of transcontinental railroad (1864 - 1869) led to the migration of Chinese citizens to the United States. Many of these immigrants migrated to the Valley after working at the transcontinental railroad construction near the Salt River Valley area. The first Chinese immigrants, three men and two women arrived in Phoenix I n 1872. The community remained rather small until 1879 when the transcontinental railroad construction along Salt River valley stopped due to extreme summer weather which led to the establishment of the First Chinatown in 1889. According to the old insurance Sanborn map, the first Chinatown in Phoenix was established along first and Adam street with diversified businesses such as laundries groceries, and restaurants. The Chinese community in the city was pretty small compared to other ethnic group settlements. Racial segregation was one of the major issues that caused the shift of First Chinatown from its original location to first and Madison Street and the Second Chinatown emerged in 1901. Post WWII, suburban sprawl and development of model single family detached homes were some of the reasons that led to disappearance of Chinatown in downtown Phoenix. In order to deliver this information and educate the public about the existence of Chinatown and the culture, I developed the concept of merging history and the 21st Century ideals by creating a place where Chinese culture is being reintroduced to Phoenix community. My design proposal for this issue is to construct a museum that is mainly focused upon historical Chinese Immigration to Phoenix and a cultural center that promotes Chinese culture, art, literature, merchandise, and cuisine in a way to reconnect mainland China and the city of Phoenix in 21st Century.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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A Study in L4ngu4g3: Exploring Communication in China's Deep Web

Description

This thesis examines the use of language and social capital in Internet communities, specifically those communities on the Deep and Dark Web that use both Chinese and English to interact.

This thesis examines the use of language and social capital in Internet communities, specifically those communities on the Deep and Dark Web that use both Chinese and English to interact. Using both individual messages and group interactions, I have compared Chinese language patterns with those of English, as well as situations in which the two languages form a compromise, in this paper dubber "hacker creole". Examples were taken from two marketplaces, one English and one Chinese, two blogs, both Chinese, and eight forums, all of which included both Chinese and English language users. One screenshot came from an English-only forum on the Tor network, for the purpose of comparison. The analysis of language included an exploration of the development of reputations on the anonymous Internet, and how building a reputation, necessary to extended interaction in the Deep Web, leaves true anonymity out of the question for users. In addition, the system by which users build or destroy their own reputations is defined under the term social credit, instead of social capital, according to Professor David Garson's definition of social capital and foundational differences in the structure of the rules of reputation online. In addition, a comparison with modern Internet language and that of classical Chinese fiction author Shi Nai'an set a foundation for the historical precedent for underdog criminals as a society, instead of an offshoot or counterculture to society. The conclusion is one that many dystopian fantasies of the modern world deem almost inevitable. Modern economies are easily on the road to systems based on social credit, currencies that no longer take physical form. This is not necessarily a communist or capitalist situation, by necessity it does not fit into the polarized definitions now used to describe political and economic situations. People leverage their way into privileges and liberties with their reputation, and the compromise of language provides the lever.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Have Government Subsidies Improved Corportate Performance in New Energy Industry? An Analysis Based On Empirical Analysis and Case Study of GCL-Poly

Description

This paper investigates the effect of government subsidies on the performance of new energy companies. An empirical analysis using data from Chinese A-share listed new energy firms and companies of

This paper investigates the effect of government subsidies on the performance of new energy companies. An empirical analysis using data from Chinese A-share listed new energy firms and companies of other industries under standard classification of industries by China Securities and Regulatory Commission and a case study of GCL-Poly are combined. The result shows that government subsidies have negative effects on new energy companies' performance and their R&D intensity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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A Foreigner's Guide to China

Description

A Foreigner's Guide to China, a creative project, is a short novel that blends cultural analysis and linguistic study in a collective investigation of modern China. As China grows at

A Foreigner's Guide to China, a creative project, is a short novel that blends cultural analysis and linguistic study in a collective investigation of modern China. As China grows at an unprecedented pace, many Americans still remain ignorant of life and development in a foreign place on the other side of the world. The project is an attempt to help mesh cultural lines and aid students, travelers, and businesspeople travelling to China for the first time. Therefore, the main goal of the entire project is to provide an actual guidebook that can be read prior to going to China or while in the country. The project is divided into two main types of chapters: cultural analysis and advice giving on day to day life in China, and linguistic study that adopts a more academic approach. Both types of chapters use my personal anecdotes to give both context and a sense of reality to the advice I include in the project. While very different in their styles, the two types of chapters ultimately work towards the same end: explaining differences and similarities between Chinese and American cultures, and giving a cultural opening from which to expand understanding. The novel is written in a lighthearted and humorous tone that attempts to soften the often seemingly offensive overtone that appears when analyzing cultures side by side. Topics include landing advice, transportation, cuisine, working life, and school life, as well as Mandarin Chinese tones, politeness, and dialects. Overall, the project has a more cultural outlook with a heavier focus on those sections.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Teaching Chinese at ASPC-EYMAN

Description

What is the value of postsecondary education in prison? For the past two years, my involvement with the Prison English Program in the Department of English at Arizona State University

What is the value of postsecondary education in prison? For the past two years, my involvement with the Prison English Program in the Department of English at Arizona State University has pushed me to explore answers to this question. I began by teaching creative writing for one semester through the Pen Project, an online internship in which undergraduate students provide critical responses to writing produced by inmates at the Penitentiary of New Mexico. The next two semesters, I co-­‐taught Shakespeare on a minimum-­‐security yard at the Arizona State Prison Complex in Florence. This semester, eager to expand my teaching repertoire and the breadth of ASU programming in Arizona prisons, I teach an introductory Chinese language course at the Cook Unit in Eyman.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Influence of Ancient Chinese and Arab-Islamic Alchemy on Medicine

Description

Modern medicine is a wonderfully complex field of study, with several advances in both its theoretical and practical aspects being made everyday. In light of the pride modern physicians and

Modern medicine is a wonderfully complex field of study, with several advances in both its theoretical and practical aspects being made everyday. In light of the pride modern physicians and scientists take in their vast knowledge, it is important to remember how far we have come throughout history. Many civilizations and cultures around the world have made essential contributions to medicine, both great and small, but no one can deny the impact both ancient Chinese and Islamic medical and alchemical practices have had on modern medicine. Qi was the central principle behind Chinese correlative thought, and it was believed to be the one thing that drove human life, as it occurred everywhere. Written texts took an increasingly more prominent role in the transmission of knowledge, and in no time at all, the educated yi ("physician") emerged. Other noteworthy contributions include an early conceptualization of the circulatory system, the development of pharmacies, the establishment of proper medical school systems, and the emergence of a set of standard hygienic practices that would allow people to take responsibility for their own health. The scholars of the Islamic Golden Age, for the most part, seemed to decry the mixing of the occult with science, and therefore sought to draw a clear distinction between alchemy (by limiting its application to the transmutation of metals) and what they deemed "real" science. Notable contributions of Arab-Islamic scientists include the pioneering of a hospital prototype, along with the development of the science of chemistry and the introduction of the experimental laboratory as the birthplace of new scientific knowledge. The important question that has yet to be answered is how extensive the connection was between the Chinese and Arab worlds. Trade was thriving during the medieval period, and so it is not wrong to assume that the exchange of goods would go hand-in-hand with the exchange of knowledge. We may never fully know exactly what happened, but further research on this topic may eventually bring an answer to light.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Xianyou (Transcendent Journeys): The Pursuit, Inquiry into and Experience of Dao in the Quanzhen School of Daoism

Description

The following paper is a translation of National Zhengzhi University Professor Li Fengmao’s original Chinese article. This translation was completed with the express approval of Professor Li, and under

The following paper is a translation of National Zhengzhi University Professor Li Fengmao’s original Chinese article. This translation was completed with the express approval of Professor Li, and under the direction of Professor Stephen R. Bokenkamp.
Quanzhen Daoism (“The Way of Complete Perfection”) is a sect of Daoism founded by master Wang Chongyang (王重陽 1113-1170) in the twelfth century AD. The tradition is, in essence, the systemization and formalization of traditional Daoist practices through the implementation of Confucian and Buddhist infrastructure. Synthesizing Confucian practices of study and copying of classics, proper human relationships, and master-student succession, and Buddhist chujia (出家 “to leave the household”) and large public monastic systems, Quanzhen Daoism established systematic mechanisms which facilitated the zealous advancement of practitioners.
The Quanzhen sect formalized the Daoist tradition of “famous mountains and enlightened teachers” and integrated the respective practices of residing in a monastery and participating in fangdao (訪道) as required components of personal cultivation, constituting “monastery residence” and “travel” experiences. These two components complemented each other and eventually came to form the integral experiences of Quanzhen cultivation. The establishment of a uniform “household system,” inter-monastery exchange system, “Pure Rules,” “Collection of Orthodox Chants,” “percept transmission system,” and “name assignment system” streamlined the acclimation process for both entering the household of religion and participating in required ceremonies during travel.
Ultimately, the systemized infrastructure established by Quanzhen Daoism allowed for the formation of a complete ordered society outside of the secular world. This Quanzhen world, in turn, provided the framework for large-scale, practical implementation of Daoist techniques, the most ideologically significant of which are participation in arduous travel and actualization of “an irregular accordance with the Dao.”

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Culture and Business: Exploring the Etiquette Behind a Chinese Business Meal

Description

The creative project titled “Culture and Business: Exploring the Etiquette Behind a Chinese Business Meal” focused on defining what is proper dining etiquette targeted at doing business with China. Through

The creative project titled “Culture and Business: Exploring the Etiquette Behind a Chinese Business Meal” focused on defining what is proper dining etiquette targeted at doing business with China. Through the use of 10 informational interviews with seasoned professionals who have experience working overseas in China, this project explored the key aspects of building relationships over a meal. Furthermore, online research was taken into account in order to provide a more up-to-date and well-rounded view. Trends that were discovered across categories include seating arrangements, gift giving, conversation topics, drinking culture, gender roles, and the actual act of eating. The goal of this project was to create an infographic and short video with the intention of educating American business students who are interested in working in China. It was found through the study that many Chinese professionals find the rules of business dining etiquette to be common sense. With globalization making developing relationships between American and Chinese businesses more accessible, providing established descriptions of how to properly conduct a business meal is essential to rising American professionals in order to ensure success in closing the business deal with their Chinese counterparts.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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To or Be or Not To Be: The Role of Syntactic Movement in Distinguishing Chinese Prepositions and Verbs

Description

For typological and historical reasons, the category of prepositions in Modern Chinese
has been long debated in terms of its distribution, its classification, and even its very existence. This paper

For typological and historical reasons, the category of prepositions in Modern Chinese
has been long debated in terms of its distribution, its classification, and even its very existence. This paper defends the existence of a prepositional category in Chinese as well as offers means to identify the category and distinguish prepositions from verbs by analyzing their distribution and syntactic capabilities. The research for this paper is based on existing literature on Chinese prepositions, Chinese syntax, and linguistic theories as well as on corpus analysis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05