Matching Items (13)

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Levels of Formality in French Translations of American TV Shows

Description

In a world where people can access a foreign language as easily as they can access Netflix, looking at and comparing translations can aid in considering the differences between cultures

In a world where people can access a foreign language as easily as they can access Netflix, looking at and comparing translations can aid in considering the differences between cultures as they are conveyed through language. The purpose of my thesis is to investigate the translation of levels of formality in American TV Shows into their French dubbed version. In particular, I survey the presence of specific lexical and morpho-syntactic French indicators of formality in the translations of five American TV Shows and how the inclusion of such features establishes the formality of a situation or relationship. Through my analysis, I explore the difficulties and concerns of translations, the effect of the translation on the audiences, and possible reasons behind the translators’ choices. When it comes to the incorporation of French lexical features, translations seem to be affected by the cultural differences between American and French society since these features deal with cultural material that is difficult to find a proper equivalence for. On the other hand, translations of morpho-syntactic features are concerned with transferring meaning from an American English structure into a French structure. When we consider these features one by one, we see how culture is filtered through language and the difficulty of translating language that is bound to a society, its institutions, and its culture.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Linguistics of a Wandering Mind in Colette's La Vagabonde: A New Translation

Description

Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette’s novel La Vagabonde about struggling 33-year-old divorcée Renée Néré has only had a handful of translations into English since its original publication in 1910. It was picked u

Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette’s novel La Vagabonde about struggling 33-year-old divorcée Renée Néré has only had a handful of translations into English since its original publication in 1910. It was picked up for its first translation in the late 1950s as a result of its sensitive nature concerning female sexuality and patriarchal oppression of the physical and mental female sphere. Due to the bowdlerized and outdated language of previous English interpretations of the novel, I set forth to create a new translation that would convey the complex simplicity of Colette’s words and the ever-relevant themes of the novel that may have been overlooked in the past. Although Colette’s diction is simple, her poetic use of grammar, focused rhetoric, and poignant insights into the female experience are deceptively intricate.

In this introduction, I discuss the methodology used while translating the novel and a few of the linguistic, semantic, and cultural problems I encountered while working on this new annotated translation. I also explain the cultural and literary context of popular novels during the fin-de-siècle that helped create motifs and themes that Colette later inverses in the novel. Colette reverses the narrative of the male spectator sitting in the dark theatre, eyes fixed on the desirable form of the female performer. Instead, Renée observes those in her life reversing the male gaze in onto itself.

Despite the meticulousness of the translator, each translation remains only an interpretation of the original text. From hunting motifs to the socio-economic role of diction in class structure during La Belle Époque, I discuss the specific diction Colette uses to show Renée’s dissociation of self and internalized misogyny in her stream-of-consciousness narration.

Following the introduction is seventy-nine pages of the new translation with annotations on certain cultural and linguistic peculiarities unique to French culture and language.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

The Society Behind the Screen: A Look at How French and American Films Represent Their Unique Cultures

Description

The purpose of this honors thesis project is to educate and excite French students on the subject of French films, as well as any person who might be interested in

The purpose of this honors thesis project is to educate and excite French students on the subject of French films, as well as any person who might be interested in immersing himself/herself in the world of French cinema. This project aims to provide an introduction to French culture through film, and thereby inspire a love of Francophone culture and movies. To accomplish this goal, this honors project will first introduce the differences between French and American films and explain how those differences are based on the underlying culture of the two regions. These differences, in addition to the language barrier, can cause cultural misunderstandings. As a result, these misunderstandings often prevent many Americans from ever experiencing French cinema. The varying history, pacing, writing styles, and gender roles of French and American films can be analyzed to discover each culture's norms and values. Though films often come from a place of imagination, they can also give clues about the life of the society that creates and watches them. After first exploring the history and evolution of cinema in France and America, the project will also analyze the major cinematic differences between the two. Finally, the project contains advice for the reader on film-watching strategies to maximize his/her understanding and enjoyment. Films can serve as a unique and educational lens where viewers can observe cultures in an entertaining environment. When watching foreign films, viewers can hope to gain more insight into the people and the norms of different cultures, and hopefully they will become excited to learn more.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

Le Prince Perdu

Description

This project explored the creation of a video game to be used as a tool to enhance the process of French language learning. The work on the project was divided

This project explored the creation of a video game to be used as a tool to enhance the process of French language learning. The work on the project was divided into three different phases that were tackled individually: a research phase, a development phase, and a content-creation phase.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

A Guide For Americans in the French Business World

Description

This guide is intended to give the reader a breakdown of the expectations and customs of the professional French environment. Whether one has French suppliers, partners, coworkers, or employees, it

This guide is intended to give the reader a breakdown of the expectations and customs of the professional French environment. Whether one has French suppliers, partners, coworkers, or employees, it is important to understand the culture that guides their expectations and actions. This guide requires no previous knowledge of French language or culture and is meant to be an introduction to the topic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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L’analyse du langage texto chez les jeunes français de Lyon

Description

As my year abroad in France was vastly approaching, it became apparent that the accessibility of certain resources would prove beneficial in the pursuit of my honors thesis in French.

As my year abroad in France was vastly approaching, it became apparent that the accessibility of certain resources would prove beneficial in the pursuit of my honors thesis in French. Thus, even before my departure it was decided that I would focus on the French texting language. While the specifics were not yet fully developed, it was certain that the subject was relevant as the use of communication technologies were becoming more prevalent amongst younger generations. Upon my arrival in Lyon, the objective of my thesis was realized as I began to slowly understand the descriptive nuances of both spoken French and the ever-changing texting language. As a language student, it felt necessary to understand and analyze both the prescriptive and descriptive facets of the French language, including those of the text shorthand. Therefore, it was my intention to learn the vocabulary and linguistic traits that were most frequented in this distinct jargon, not solely for myself, but also for my fellow students of French. This task was accomplished by reading and recording the text messages from ten native speakers. These texts were then compiled into a proper corpus, which was primarily used as the resource for the further applied projects I wished to create. Given this research, a type of dictionary was organized from the words that I found to be most exemplary of the French texting language. In addition, an analysis was also written concerning the common linguistics traits found in the corpus. It was my intent to provide the students of Arizona State University with relevant resources that could assist in the immersion process during or before their study abroad experience. In pursuit of any language, it seems that it is integral to maintain a sense of understanding of all common elements of a language, as they are constantly evolving. Thus, it was important for me in my attempt to master French that I understood all the nuances of the vernacular that were being used by the native speakers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Second Language Teacher's Guide to the Flipped Classroom

Description

In the past few years the pedagogical model of the "Flipped Classroom" has gained popularity among educators, initially at the secondary level and now at the university level. In the

In the past few years the pedagogical model of the "Flipped Classroom" has gained popularity among educators, initially at the secondary level and now at the university level. In the 2015-2016 school year, Arizona State University listed its first intensive language courses, which implemented the flipped model. During this time the author of this project was given the opportunity to work as the facilitator for the flipped French courses FRE 110 and 210. While helping to implement the flipped model, he reflected on his experiences, discussed its advantages and limitations with other second language instructors teaching in a flipped environment, and researched a large array of academic and educational resources. This creative project was completed to practically apply the techniques developed in the intensive French course and those developed by other educators in order to give advice and strategies to future instructors. It represents a web Guide to the Flipped Classroom in Second Language Teaching, which includes research on educational practices such as course design, syllabus creation, and lesson planning; infographics and other visual representations of the flipped model, sample home-made and professional course materials, embedded informational videos, and advice on implementing the flipped model. While other websites exist, there are few that reflect specifically on the use of the flipped classroom in second language teaching, and even fewer that discuss in great detail the challenges and limitations associated with the model. Furthermore, the guide contains an extensive list of online tools for the creation of multimedia materials, such as screen capturing and YouTube-clipping programs as well as a variety of different resource sites where educators can find and share materials. Overall, this web guide acts as a useful tool for second language instructors in secondary education, higher education, or any other educational setting who wish to implement this up-and-coming teaching model.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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A Capital Power: The French Influence on the American Understanding of the Upper Class

Description

A social phenomenon in the United States characterizes French language and culture by aristocracy and prestige, sometimes even going so far as to align francophones with pretentiousness or false sophistication.

A social phenomenon in the United States characterizes French language and culture by aristocracy and prestige, sometimes even going so far as to align francophones with pretentiousness or false sophistication. By means of etymological analysis of the registers of American politics, economics, higher education, fashion, and art, I present the remarkable consistency (if not disproportionality) of French-derived vocabulary within the lexicons of these upper class cultural territories. Final conclusion is reached using the analytic lenses of linguist Norman Fairclough and sociologist Thorstein Veblen in their respective works Language and Power and Theory of the Leisure Class, which together supply a sociolinguistic understanding of the French-elite nexus. Using such information, I seek to explain the phenomenon as an American ideological concept. As French expressions are substantially and conspicuously employed within the lexicons and customs of the aforementioned cultural territories of the American upper class, French lexicality and culture become entangled with high society (sociolexical entanglement) and popular aesthetics (vogue lexicality). This intermixture subsequently engenders a French-elite nexus that manifests through either lexical emulation or lexical disaffection. To illustrate this occurrence, I offer evidence of America's persuasion of its upper class's association with French by presenting relevant expressions in the class-pervasive medium of American cinema. I argue that, in entirety, these sociolexical components frame the development of a larger French-elite ideology.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Urban Culture in Lyon, France Today: Exploring its Creators and Consumers

Description

This work aims to give the general public a unique insight into French urban culture through my experience while living and filming a personal documentary in Lyon, France. The goal

This work aims to give the general public a unique insight into French urban culture through my experience while living and filming a personal documentary in Lyon, France. The goal of the project is to examine and consequently describe what this culture consists of while comparing and contrasting it to our own urban culture. The work depicts the creators and performers of the culture as well as its audience, which differs from our own here in the U.S in part thanks to France's efficient public transportation system, used by people from every social class. Immersing myself in this fascinating world truly helped me get through to the heart of the French people and artists that make up the urban culture in Lyon. Observing performances and daily practices while digging deep into each artist's story allowed me to unravel the identity of this culture one person at a time.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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George Sand’s Indiana, As Seen by Her Illustrators: Tony Johannot’s 1852 Hetzel Edition

Description

George Sand (née Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, 1804 – 1876) was one of the most celebrated French authors of her time and remains to this day a central figure in

George Sand (née Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, 1804 – 1876) was one of the most celebrated French authors of her time and remains to this day a central figure in French literary history. She produced throughout her lifetime an extraordinarily broad body of literary works, including short stories, novels, periodicals, newspaper articles, political commentaries, and even plays. One of her most well-known works, and her first novel published under her male pseudonym, was Indiana, which recounts the rise and fall of a young bourgeoise trapped in a loveless marriage, while also touching on the political climate of the age. Indiana was remarkably successful and popular when it was published and catapulted Sand to fame as she became a full-time writer who supported her family and lifestyle purely from sales of her works. The success of Indiana and many other of her works prompted a re-release of her body of works in nine volumes, titled Les Œuvres illustrées de George Sand. The volume studied in this thesis contains seventy-seven engraved illustrations of various scenes from each text. The engravings were produced by the very famous French artist and illustrator Tony Johannot with the help of Sand’s own son, Maurice Sand. Johannot was very well-known during his career and produced engravings for the biggest names in European literature such as Molière, Lord Byron, Cervantes, Goethe, Balzac, and others, including Sand.
In these books, illustrations were distributed throughout the text so the reader could visualize many of the storyline’s scenes. The authors themselves, however, did not oversee or produce these images, so it was at the discretion of the illustrator as to how each character, setting, facial expression, motif, etc. would be drawn. Sand was well-known for being avant-garde, progressive, independent, and, notably, female. Her opinions understandably clashed with many of the stereotypical views of the 19th century on many topics, particularly when it came to the treatment of women. By contrast, Johannot was a very well-respected and successful male artist with solid connections with influential publishers, who catered to a specific audience of well-off and well-educated buyers. The buyers of his works, particularly of his illustrated texts, were often parents of the upper middle class who wanted books to be used as gifts providing not only entertainment but also instruction and moral life lessons to their children. Johannot’s interpretations of Sand’s Indiana, which was considered scandalous and controversial upon its release, could therefore shift some of the most controversial aspects of the novel from what Sand originally intended. There are many reasons as to why Johannot might make certain interpretations of the text. He likely wanted to maintain his status as a successful author and please his audience, typically middle and upper middle-class, wealthy, and bourgeois literate patrons who educated themselves and their children by exposing themselves to books and works of art, as was traditional at the time. Additionally, his fundamental personal opinions as a successful business man might differ from Sand’s opinions as a female author, as traditional gendered roles and stereotypes often prevented the financial and societal independence of women.
This thesis will compare Johannot’s images created for Indiana with Sand’s original French text. In doing so, the reader can gain an understanding of how social status and personal interpretations can affect the way an artist represents a scene. Many of Johannot’s images agree with Sand, while others do not; some of the main similarities and differences will be analyzed to understand how and why such artistic differences occur.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05