Matching Items (12)

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Trekster: A National Parks Business Plan

Description

Trekster is an online outdoor website that provides the tools and information necessary for any person to complete a given outdoor activity that matches his/her ability, age, location, and desires

Trekster is an online outdoor website that provides the tools and information necessary for any person to complete a given outdoor activity that matches his/her ability, age, location, and desires with a focus on United States National Parks and National Monument travel. Over time, Trekster will create a sizable repository of trails and activities that reflect a geographically diverse nation and the equally diverse interests the population of the world seek to enjoy in these awe-inspiring locales. Trekster will focus on content creation and the updating of existing content to continually offer the most precise and voluminous information on a given trail, activity, or news item. Trekster is a Limited Liability Company with roots in Arizona and Colorado. Trekster will be managed by Kurtis Zinger, an outdoorsman and businessman keen on finding solutions to problems he has experienced in his travel planning within the national parks. The idea for Trekster originated with a lack of helpful content available from the National Park Service websites for travel to the United States National Parks and National Monuments. Visitation at parks has continued to increase most years over the past three decades, yet the National Parks Service has not been able to successfully serve the demand of an eager outdoor demographic. Trekster is designed for ease-of-use and its target market ranges from senior citizens and foreign visitors to American citizens that are avid backpackers, hikers, and/or campers. Trekster will provide these markets with the tools needed to improve their outdoor or National Park experience, especially because of the lack of these resources at other websites for a reasonable price. As revenue will be Trekster's primary revenue stream, but by keeping expenses limited to marketing efforts after the first year of operation, Trekster will reach its break-even point by 2017 and will make positive profits that grow exponentially during the years that follow. After 2020, Trekster will have content for all 50 states and will begin exploring unique ways to deliver content and explore other potential revenue sources. Trekster will be the premier online destination for travelers to National Parks and adventurers hoping to find more than a superficial introduction to a complex maze of information. By providing quality content free of charge, Trekster will become a favorite resource of outdoor enthusiasts and a source of community for those who find solace and adventure in the outdoors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

Digging into National Park Funding: An Analysis of Selected Projects in Yellowstone and Isle Royale

Description

With 2016 marking the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service (NPS), important discussions regarding the future of America's beloved parks and respective government funding must take place. Imagine all

With 2016 marking the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service (NPS), important discussions regarding the future of America's beloved parks and respective government funding must take place. Imagine all the money, including tax revenue, flowing through America's national parks system, and where is that money destined for in the future? National park funding will factor greatly into determining the future of America's NPS and individual parks. Therefore, it is imperative to investigate where and how government funding, for the present and future, is distributed throughout the parks protected under the NPS. Through personal experiences as a child, national parks consistently provide a unique exposure to and an education of the natural world, which are rare finds when growing up in suburban or metropolitan regions. Narrowing down, this analysis will focus on government disbursements to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) and Isle Royale National Park (Isle Royale) with specifics on two budgeted projects crucial to park survival. Yellowstone and Isle Royale each request funding for a project crucial to the park's ecosystem and a project intended to improve guest services for visitors. Closing comments will provide recommendations for Yellowstone, Isle Royale and the NPS, including effects of President Trump's 2018 Government Proposed Budget, in an attempt to offer forward thinking about national parks. The projects and respective funding as detailed in this analysis have a forward-thinking focus as other projects included in the NPS requested funding budgets consider as well. Current actions and efforts are crucial to the long-term life and of this country's national parks for future generations to come.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Social Parks

Description

Social media is shaping a new generation of hikers and adventurers, as more and more millennials are finding themselves out on the trails. Are they doing it all for the

Social media is shaping a new generation of hikers and adventurers, as more and more millennials are finding themselves out on the trails. Are they doing it all for the 'gram? Are they seeking adventure? Or is it a combination of the two? "Social Parks" follows three millennials through national parks like Zion, The Grand Canyon, and Rocky Mountain in search of an answer.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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National Parks: Preserving the American Concept of Wilderness

Description

In “The Trouble of Wilderness,” William Cronon (1995) states the concept of wilderness, historically, is based on the romanticized ideal of the “untamed” frontier that influenced the American expansion ideals

In “The Trouble of Wilderness,” William Cronon (1995) states the concept of wilderness, historically, is based on the romanticized ideal of the “untamed” frontier that influenced the American expansion ideals in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including the initial conservation movement. This idea of wilderness is defined by “empty” lands that needed to be utilized by the civilized Anglo-Americans, or lands that needed to be preserved from human alterations. Wilderness was separate from humans and, therefore, was also thought to be land that had been unaltered by human touch. The disappearing frontier was being turned into farmlands and civilization, so the Anglo-Americans, the ones who culturally viewed undeveloped land as a place for recreation, wished to save the ‘wilderness’ that was not yet being used. But as will be discussed it was in fact being used just not by the Anglo-Americans. This wilderness that they were trying to preserve became the national parks, such as Yellowstone and Yosemite. Under this rationale, Indigenous peoples were forced off the land to create the illusion of these places fitting this romanticized idea of wilderness. This essay examines the national parks in context of this concept of wilderness being free from humans and how national parks rationalized the removal of Indigenous people from these “wild” lands by using this concept of wilderness. Specifically, it uses the history of Yellowstone and Yosemite parks, which are some of the first parks to enter the National Park System, as sites of understanding how the idea wilderness was conceptualized by the American government during the late 1800s as places that are separate from humans. This essay argues that these ideals are based on racist and xenophobic approaches that the early United States government used in regards to relationships with Indigenous people. To discuss these ideas, this paper will examine the language used in early government documents regarding the policies of the national parks along with art and writings from this time period to show how the public and government viewed these national parks and the Indigenous people in the surrounding areas. Particularly, this paper will consider the original documents that established the national parks and the language that was used in these documents. It will then compare these policies from the origins of the national parks to the policies in place now regarding Indigenous people, such as the reparations that are trying to be made in these areas.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Lack of diversity in national park visitation: history, theory, and change.

Description

People of color, and more especially Black Americans, make up a minuscule portion of annual National Park visitation. This podcast is a look into the prejudiced history surrounding the formation

People of color, and more especially Black Americans, make up a minuscule portion of annual National Park visitation. This podcast is a look into the prejudiced history surrounding the formation of the national parks, the modern theories surrounding continuing lack of park diversity, and personal accounts of where the movement for outdoor equality is going and where your support should go. This all culminates into a project that aims to understand why this statistic exists as it is and present it through podcast.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Lack of diversity in national park visitation: history, theory, and change.

Description

People of color, and more especially Black Americans, make up a minuscule portion of annual National Park visitation. This podcast is a look into the prejudiced history surrounding the formation

People of color, and more especially Black Americans, make up a minuscule portion of annual National Park visitation. This podcast is a look into the prejudiced history surrounding the formation of the national parks, the modern theories surrounding continuing lack of park diversity, and personal accounts of where the movement for outdoor equality is going and where your support should go. This all culminates into a project that aims to understand why this statistic exists as it is and present it through podcast.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Blank National Park

Description

Our thesis project, blanknationalpark.com, asked one question : how is climate change impacting National Parks in America? We decided to travel to three different areas: Joshua Tree, Glacier and Everglades

Our thesis project, blanknationalpark.com, asked one question : how is climate change impacting National Parks in America? We decided to travel to three different areas: Joshua Tree, Glacier and Everglades National Park. It didn’t take long to discover that there was never a definitive answer. The effects of climate change looked different in every park we visited. Joshua Tree was struggling with changes in temperature, climate regime and an increase in fires. The U.S Geological Survey predicted that all of the glaciers in Glacier National Park could be gone by 2030. Everglades National Park was facing the constant threat of sea-level rise, invasive species and stronger hurricanes. However, in every park, one thing was certain - they all would not have their iconic features in the future due to climate change. For our thesis, we created blanknationalpark.com to emphasize the fact that Joshua Tree National Park won’t have Joshua Trees in the coming centuries, glaciers would cease to exist in Glacier National Park and the entire Everglades ecosystem itself will be underwater in the next century and a half. Thus, our project name, “Blank National Park”, pays tribute to the uncertainty of what these famous landscapes could look like in the future. Our main goal was to provide the public with a visual experience that is not only informative but engaging so that we could provide an educational experience about a critical situation without appearing too dismal. We chose to include our last page, ‘Solutions’, to establish hope for the future, and encourage people to take action to help preserve National Parks and the world we live in.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Loving them to Death?: Crowding and the National Park Experience After Desert Solitaire

Description

The national parks are often considered to be one of America’s greatest achievements. Through a rich and sometimes tumultuous history, the national parks have been shaped from unwanted swaths of

The national parks are often considered to be one of America’s greatest achievements. Through a rich and sometimes tumultuous history, the national parks have been shaped from unwanted swaths of land into some of the most famous landscapes in the country. There are ultimately two conflicting goals of the national parks: provide enjoyment for the American people and protect the land. In recent years, increased popularity of the parks has made achieving these dual goals particularly difficult. Crowding in the parks leads to both ecological and social problems that threaten both goals of the national parks. Crowding is a multifaceted issue that must be explored from multiple perspectives.

Using Zion as a case study, the problems of crowding are explored and evaluated. First the history of the national parks is described to determine how the parks were created and popularized. After exploring the history of the parks, crowding in the national parks will be
discussed, including an overview of some of the significant social science literature exploring
crowding and its impact on visitor experience. This analysis will conclude with an examination
of visitor management strategies and an examination of the park-specific literature about the specific problems and decisions confronting managers at Zion National Park. A personal account of a visit to Zion during the peak season will provide a personal narrative about the meaning and purpose of the park experience.

The final section of this thesis will consider a range of opposing views on the philosophy of national parks and the park experience, centering around the ideas of Abbey, to address the deeper questions surrounding the goals of park management as we likely more toward an even more crowded park future. Ultimately the paper concludes that the parks has shifted irrevocably away from the ideals of Abbey, although his voice still provides inspiration to generations of park lovers. Additionally, while hard limits must eventually be set, in an era of increasing human influence, the park experience will need to be redefined to be more expansive and inclusive of all who wish to visit and enjoy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Human-Wildlife Conflict Management in a Rapidly Changing World

Description

As human populations continue to expand, interactions with wildlife are expected to increase due to destruction of land and global climate change threatening native habitats. Established areas of protection are

As human populations continue to expand, interactions with wildlife are expected to increase due to destruction of land and global climate change threatening native habitats. Established areas of protection are becoming essential to species survival and biodiversity protection. National Parks (NP) are a globally ubiquitous method employed to protect wildlife and habitats. Often NPs are mosaics of relatively small protected areas in a “sea” of human-dominated landscapes, and these remaining habitat “islands” are becoming essential to preventing species extinction. However, the establishment of a NP can lead to increased human-wildlife conflicts (HWC) and disenfranchisement of local communities, particularly along their borders. We conducted semi-structured interviews in six different countries to better understand the nature of HWCs at the borders of major NPs: (1) Khao Yai NP, Thailand; (2) Myall Lakes NP, Australia; (3) Chitwan NP, Nepal; (4) Kruger NP, South Africa; (5) Chingaza NP, Colombia, and (6) Yellowstone NP, United States. We evaluated affinity to wildlife, perception of conflicts, management success, and potential solutions at each park to better understand the global nature of HWCs.We also evaluated these data in relationship to the Human Development Index (HDI) to determine if there was a correlation between development and conflict issues. We found the intrinsic value of wildlife to not markedly differ between countries. Conflict was perceived as higher in the United States and Australia but was known to be of greater intensity in Nepal and South Africa. Management of NPs was well-regarded with a slight decrease from less-developed countries to more-developed countries, with solutions that were creative and unique to each region. Results appeared to be related to shifting baselines between countries and also to equivalency in a cross-cultural assessment. When these theories are taken into account, the complexity of HWCs globally is better understood. As our world continues to expand and NPs become some of the only contiguous native habitat and refuges for wildlife, it is important to understand the complex relationships occurring at the interface between natural and human communities and to explore effective solutions to these problems.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05