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What is Social Entrepreneurship? A review of literature 2010-2015

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Social entrepreneurship has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Scholars constantly debate of the meaning of the term and the direction of the field. This paper explores literature written between the years 2010 \u2014 2015 in an

Social entrepreneurship has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Scholars constantly debate of the meaning of the term and the direction of the field. This paper explores literature written between the years 2010 \u2014 2015 in an effort to understand the current state of social entrepreneurship and gain insight as to the direction it is headed. This paper looks at definitions, characteristics, geographical differences, legal designations, and major themes such as social enterprise, social innovation, & social value as well as the implications for performance measures in an attempt to understand the broad concept that is social entrepreneurship.

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2016-05

Human Connection and Edible Green Spaces

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This paper explores Grace Logan and Emma Zuber’s understanding of how edible green spaces are mediums for emotional and social well-being. Our research aims to answer these questions: How are different populations benefitting in terms of their emotional and social

This paper explores Grace Logan and Emma Zuber’s understanding of how edible green spaces are mediums for emotional and social well-being. Our research aims to answer these questions: How are different populations benefitting in terms of their emotional and social well-being in similar and different ways from edible green spaces in Phoenix, Arizona? How does accessibility to garden spaces as well as time, in both frequency and duration, impact personal and communal connection? To answer these questions, we surveyed volunteers from four different garden populations - Sage Garden at Arizona State University (ASU), Desert Marigold School (DMS), TigerMountain Foundation (TMF), and Growhouse Urban Agriculture Center (GUAC). Before the volunteer surveys, we interviewed a garden leader or founder to gain a better understanding of their intentions for the space and their perspective on how the garden impacts emotional and social well-being benefits in their community. The results of the survey included some variance in subpopulation answers but, overall, volunteers answered similarly. This led us to determine that gardens do bring emotional and social benefits to people, but the degree of these benefits prove difficult to truly determine due to the complexity of personal needs across different subpopulations. As well, our research on time and access proved too limited in this study to make a definitive conclusion on how it impacts personal and communal connections, but the research does suggest that time could be a determining factor for subpopulations. This study also made recommendations based on our findings, so that policies could be enacted to ensure people can access green spaces to improve their overall well-being.

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2020-05

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Understanding the Various Uses of Urban Green Space: How Public Parks Contribute to Hedonic Happiness in Downtown Phoenix

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Research has long supported the idea that parks contribute to physical and mental well-being. Evidence has shown that the presence of parks reduces stress, positively impacts health, and can lower the risk of crime in neighborhoods. There have been studies

Research has long supported the idea that parks contribute to physical and mental well-being. Evidence has shown that the presence of parks reduces stress, positively impacts health, and can lower the risk of crime in neighborhoods. There have been studies that discuss variables that impact the accessibility and quality of parks in neighborhoods such as ethnicity, income, and gender. More recently, research has delved into the impact of parks on individual's happiness. Findings imply that the desire for happiness may be satisfied by park visitation and provide evidence that suggests the diversity of park activities is a significant contributor to happiness. This study aims to identify how varying park designs contribute to individual happiness. Three hypotheses are presented: 1) frequency of park visits is positively correlated with life satisfaction, 2) park structure impacts efficacy of parks to promote happiness, and 3) adults travel to parks specifically to improve their mood. Hypothesis 1 is used to understand the relationship between park visitation and overall satisfaction, hypothesis 2 aims to identify how the physical structure of the park contributes to personal happiness, and hypothesis 3 provides an understanding for what motivates adults to visit parks. This study's results indicate that there is no significant correlation between frequency of park visits and life satisfaction, nor is there a significant correlation between physical park structure and increased happiness. While an insignificant amount of participants reported traveling to parks specifically to enhance their mood, the majority of participants indicated traveling to the park to participate in an activity that positively affects their happiness. This study can act as a tool for urban planners to get an idea of why people visit parks and which features they use while they're there. This information can provide guidance when deciding what to include in future parks, utilizing their budget in a way that maximizes community use and happiness.

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2016-12