Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

135167-Thumbnail Image.png

A Guide to Large Binocular Telescope Data Reduction

Description

Abstract Located in southeastern Arizona, the Large Binocular Telescope is a great local resource for ASU astronomy/cosmology researchers. As a ground-based observatory, the Large Binocular Telescope can effectively provide deep, complementary observations of science fields in the wavelength range of

Abstract Located in southeastern Arizona, the Large Binocular Telescope is a great local resource for ASU astronomy/cosmology researchers. As a ground-based observatory, the Large Binocular Telescope can effectively provide deep, complementary observations of science fields in the wavelength range of 3,500 to 10,000 Angstroms. This gives scientists a lot of opportunity for various science projects, which can lead to massive amounts of observations being taken by research schools with ties to the LBT. Such is the case with ASU, which has obtained over 30 hours of data in just the SDT Uspec filter on board the Large Binocular Camera (Blue) and much more time in other filters observing longer wavelengths. Because of this, there is a huge need for establishing a system that will allow the reduction of raw astronomical images from the LBT to be quickly, but accurately. This manuscript serves as a presentation of the work done over the 2015-2016 school year to establish a pipeline for reducing LBT raw science images as well as a guide for future undergraduates and graduates to reduce data on their own.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

164759-Thumbnail Image.png

Properties of the Faint (uJy) Radio Source Population

Description

I present a multi-spectral analysis of the faint, uJy, radio source population in the James Webb Space Telescope North Ecliptic Pole Time Domain Field. Very Long Baseline Array pointings at the 127 brightest of ~2500 radio galaxies identified with the

I present a multi-spectral analysis of the faint, uJy, radio source population in the James Webb Space Telescope North Ecliptic Pole Time Domain Field. Very Long Baseline Array pointings at the 127 brightest of ~2500 radio galaxies identified with the Very Large Array indicate active galactic nucleus contamination of approximately 9.45%. My estimates of 4.8 GHz brightness of this radio source population indicate an upper bound on this contamination of 10.6%. This is well within acceptable limits, in population studies, for the use of the radio-FIR relation in the JWST NEP TDF. This improves the utility of the field to the community by reducing the need for expensive FIR observations. I have also developed an extensive catalog of magnitudes and other data in visible bands of this population. My analysis in these bands does not give any conclusive criteria for distinguishing between AGN and SFGs. The strongest trends I do identify appear to be due to reddening by interstellar dust. Future follow-up will focus on characterizing individual sources in further depth.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05