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Correlating Galactic Magnetic Fields with Regions of Dense Star Formation using LOFAR and CALIFA

Description

I test the hypothesis that galactic magnetic fields originate from regions of dense
star formation (Dahlem et al. 2006) by comparing maps of 120-240 MHz synchrotron emission and hydrogen alpha (Hα) emission of the tidally-interacting, edge-on, barred spiral galaxy UGC

I test the hypothesis that galactic magnetic fields originate from regions of dense
star formation (Dahlem et al. 2006) by comparing maps of 120-240 MHz synchrotron emission and hydrogen alpha (Hα) emission of the tidally-interacting, edge-on, barred spiral galaxy UGC 9665. Synchrotron emission traces magnetic field strength to a rough first order, while Hα emission traces recent massive star formation. UGC 9665 was selected because it was included in the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) TwoMetre Sky Survey (LoTSS; Shimwell et al. (2017)) as well as the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA; Sanchez et al. (2012)). I generated vertical intensity profiles at several distances along the disk from the galactic center for synchrotron emission and Hα in order to measure how the intensity of each falls off with distance from the midplane. In addition to correlating the vertical profiles to see if there is a relationship between star formation and magnetic field strength, I fit the LOFAR vertical profiles to characteristic Gaussian and exponential functions given by Dumke et al. (1995). Fitting these equations have been shown to be good indicators of the main mode of cosmic ray transport, whether it is advection (exponential fit) or diffusion (Gaussian fit) (Heesen et al. 2016). Cosmic rays originate from supernova,
and core collapse supernovae occur in star forming regions, which also produce
advective winds, so I test the correlation between star-forming regions and advective regions as predicted by the Heesen et al. (2016) method. Similar studies should be conducted on different galaxies in the future in order to further test these hypotheses and how well LOFAR and CALIFA complement each other, which will be made possible by the full release of the LOFAR Two-Metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) (Shimwell et al. 2017).

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Studying Spectral Index of Radio Galaxies with LOFAR

Description

Radio astronomy is a subfield in astronomy that deals with objects emitting frequencies around 10 MHz to 100 GHz. The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is a array of radio antennas in Europe that can reach very low frequencies, roughly between

Radio astronomy is a subfield in astronomy that deals with objects emitting frequencies around 10 MHz to 100 GHz. The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is a array of radio antennas in Europe that can reach very low frequencies, roughly between 10-240 MHz. Our project was to image and clean a field from LOFAR. The data was a 10 degree square in the sky centered at a right ascension of 10:19:34.608 and a declination +49.36.52.482. It was observed for 600 seconds at 141 MHz. To clean the field, we had to flag and remove any stations that were not responding. Using a program called FACTOR, we cleaned the image and reduced the residuals. Next we checked the validity of our sources. We checked positional offsets for our sources using the TGSS survey at 150 MHz, and corrected the declination of our LOFAR sources by a factor of 0.0002 degrees. We also fixed the LOFAR fluxes by a factor of 1.15. After this systematic check, we calculated the spectral index of our sources using the FIRST survey at 1435 MHz. We plotted this spectral index against LOFAR flux as well as redshift of the sources, and compared these to literature.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Probing the Radio Sky with the Low Frequency Array

Description

The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new and innovative radio telescope designed and constructed by the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON). LOFAR unique capable of operating in very low frequencies (10-240 MHz) and consists of an extensive interferometry

The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new and innovative radio telescope designed and constructed by the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON). LOFAR unique capable of operating in very low frequencies (10-240 MHz) and consists of an extensive interferometry array of dipole antenna stations distributed throughout the Netherlands and Europe which allows it to achieve superb angular resolution. I investigate a part of the northern sky to search for rare radio objects such as radio haloes and radio relics that may have not been able to have been resolved by other radio telescopes.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

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Photometric Color Correction of the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS)

Description

The Star Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) will be a 6U CubeSat devoted to photometric monitoring of M dwarfs in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) (160 and 280 nm respectively), measuring the time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and evolution of

The Star Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) will be a 6U CubeSat devoted to photometric monitoring of M dwarfs in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) (160 and 280 nm respectively), measuring the time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and evolution of M dwarf stellar UV radiation. The delta-doped detectors baselined for SPARCS have demonstrated more than five times the in-band quantum efficiency of the detectors of GALEX. Given that red:UV photon emission from cool, low-mass stars can be million:one, UV observation of thes stars are susceptible to red light contamination. In addition to the high efficiency delta-doped detectors, SPARCS will include red-rejection filters to help minimize red leak. Even so, careful red-rejection and photometric calibration is needed. As was done for GALEX, white dwarfs are used for photometric calibration in the UV. We find that the use of white dwarfs to calibrate the observations of red stars leads to significant errors in the reported flux, due to the differences in white dwarf and red dwarf spectra. Here we discuss the planned SPARCS calibration model and the color correction, and demonstrate the importance of this correction when recording UV measurements of M stars taken by SPARCS.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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The Effect of Varying Mass Loss Rate on the Initial-Final Mass Relation of Massive Stars

Description

Stellar mass loss has a high impact on the overall evolution of a star. The amount<br/>of mass lost during a star’s lifetime dictates which remnant will be left behind and how<br/>the circumstellar environment will be affected. Several rates of mass

Stellar mass loss has a high impact on the overall evolution of a star. The amount<br/>of mass lost during a star’s lifetime dictates which remnant will be left behind and how<br/>the circumstellar environment will be affected. Several rates of mass loss have been<br/>proposed for use in stellar evolution codes, yielding discrepant results from codes using<br/>different rates. In this paper, I compare the effect of varying the mass loss rate in the<br/>stellar evolution code TYCHO on the initial-final mass relation. I computed four sets of<br/>models with varying mass loss rates and metallicities. Due to a large number of models<br/>reaching the luminous blue variable stage, only the two lower metallicity groups were<br/>considered. Their mass loss was analyzed using Python. Luminosity, temperature, and<br/>radius were also compared. The initial-final mass relation plots showed that in the 1/10<br/>solar metallicity case, reducing the mass loss rate tended to increase the dependence of final mass on initial mass. The limited nature of these results implies a need for further study into the effects of using different mass loss rates in the code TYCHO.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Numerical Simulation of the Surface Brightness of Astrophysical Jets

Description

The goal of this thesis is to extend the astrophysical jet model created by Dr.
Gardner and Dr. Jones to model the surface brightness of astrophysical jets. We attempt to accomplish this goal by modeling the astrophysical jet HH30 in

The goal of this thesis is to extend the astrophysical jet model created by Dr.
Gardner and Dr. Jones to model the surface brightness of astrophysical jets. We attempt to accomplish this goal by modeling the astrophysical jet HH30 in the spectral emission lines [SII] 6716Å, [OI] 6300Å, and [NII] 6583Å. In order to do so, we used the jet model to simulate the temperature and density of the jet to match observational data by Hartigan and Morse (2007). From these results, we derived the emissivities in these emission lines using Cloudy by Ferland et al. (2013). Then we used the emissivities to determine the surface brightness of the jet in these lines. We found that the simulated surface brightness agreed with the observational surface brightness and we conclude that the model could successfully be extended to model the surface brightness of a jet.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-12

Population III Stars and Evolutionary Stellar Metallicity

Description

Study of the early Universe is filled with many unknowns, one of which is the nature of the very first generation of stars, otherwise designated as "Population III stars". The early Universe was composed almost entirely of cold hydrogen and

Study of the early Universe is filled with many unknowns, one of which is the nature of the very first generation of stars, otherwise designated as "Population III stars". The early Universe was composed almost entirely of cold hydrogen and helium, with only trace amounts of any heavier elements. As such, these stars would have compositions very different from the stars we are able to observe today, which would in turn change how these stars functioned, as well as their lifespans. Population III stars are so old that the light they emitted has not yet reached us here on Earth. Yet we know they have to have existed, so how do we go about studying objects that we have not yet observed? And more importantly, is there a metallicity threshold at which stars begin to behave like the stars we observe today? These areas are where stellar modelling programs such as TYCHO8 and the Spanish Virtual Observatory's Theoretical Spectra Web Server (TSWS) come in. These programs allow astronomers to model the physics of Pop III stars. We can get a pretty good understanding of how these stars behaved, how long they lived, and the visual spectra they would have emitted. Such information is crucial to astronomers being able to search for remnants of these stars, and one day, the stars themselves.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05