Matching Items (3)

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Age distribution in caller descriptions of seizure-like symptoms in 9-1-1 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest calls

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Given the high prevalence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), the low survival rate, the high morbidity rate, and the significant cost to both the patient and the system, it is

Given the high prevalence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), the low survival rate, the high morbidity rate, and the significant cost to both the patient and the system, it is imperative that we address any and all factors that contribute to recognition of a OHCA case, any barriers that prevent chest compressions, and improve medical care to treat OHCA events in order to increase survival rate, decrease morbidity, and lessen the economical burden of cardiac arrest events. Additionally, understanding the relationship between seizures and OHCA can help medical professionals, including Neurologists and other doctors, to explain to the public when one should call into EMS regarding a seizure-like event in the event of a possible OHCA. This would help to address and alleviate the result of this major public health concern.

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  • 2020-05

An Evaluation of the American Heart Association's Official 2012 Hands-Only CPR Instructional Video Effectiveness in Teaching School-Aged Adolescents CPR

Description

Background: The American Heart Association has created an Official 2012 Hands-Only CPR Instructional Video that is approximately one minute in length and has been viewed over 600,000 times on YouTube.

Background: The American Heart Association has created an Official 2012 Hands-Only CPR Instructional Video that is approximately one minute in length and has been viewed over 600,000 times on YouTube. Objective: To evaluate the video's effectiveness in teaching adolescents aged 12-17 hands-only CPR. Methodology: The study took place in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Study participants were recruited from high schools, junior high schools and the Tempe Boys & Girls Club. The 100 study participants took a short, four question survey and watched video on either a laptop computer or video projector. Participants were then subjected to a cardiac arrest mock scenario in which they were tested on calling 911, compression rate, compression depth, and hand placement using a Lifeform CPArlene Recording Manikin. In analysis of the data, subjects were separated into four groups: 12-14 year olds (middle school aged) who had previous CPR training (MSG-T), 12-14 year olds with no previous training (MSG-U), 15-17 year olds (high school aged) who had previous training (HSG-T) and 15-17 year olds with no previous training (HSG-U). Results: Every study participant performed hands-only CPR during the mock scenario. Between the two middle school-aged groups, the MSG-U was more likely to call 911 during the mock scenario (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in compression rate and depth between the MSG-U and MSG-T. Between the two high school-aged groups, the HSG-T was more likely to call 911 during the mock scenario (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in compression rate between the HSG-T and HSG-U groups. The HSG-T compressed the chest significantly deeper than the HSG-U group (P<0.05). The HSG-T was the only group to statistically be on par with the AHA recommended 100 compressions/minute (P<0.05). All other groups were significantly below the 100 compressions/minute standard. No groups were statistically on par with the AHA recommended compression depth of two inches. Conclusion: The Official 2012 Hands-Only Instructional Video should not be used as a definitive training tool to teach school-aged adolescents hands-only CPR. This video, as well as other similar training videos, would be useful as introductory tools for children 12-14 years of age or as a refresher for older children who have received previous training.

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  • 2013-05

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The evaluation of different foams and thermoplastics to develop a biofidelic CPR manikin

Description

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency course of action developed to sustain oxygenated blood flow in persons suffering from cardiac arrest by manually compressing the heart in the chest and

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency course of action developed to sustain oxygenated blood flow in persons suffering from cardiac arrest by manually compressing the heart in the chest and providing rescue ventilations. The best-selling CPR manikins, an integral part of training, lack biofidelic characteristics in appearance, feel, and response, and as a result, the rescuer's learning experience suffers. The objective of this thesis was to test the compressibility properties of different foams and thermoplastics in order to determine which material would most accurately imitate a human chest response. The results suggested that styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) was the best choice, because its increasing stiffness under increasing compression was characteristic of a human chest cavity. Further testing must be done to determine the best composition of SEBS, analyze its response under cyclic compressions, and improve its durability.

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  • 2014-05