Matching Items (11)

Grow: A Garden Sustainability Club for Students in Grades Fourth through Sixth

Description

As an aspiring educator pursuing a degree in education, hours have been spent observing, visiting, and working in classrooms of elementary schools. In this time, it has become apparent that social studies and science are not a priority within classrooms

As an aspiring educator pursuing a degree in education, hours have been spent observing, visiting, and working in classrooms of elementary schools. In this time, it has become apparent that social studies and science are not a priority within classrooms or even schools as a whole. This dilemma caused extreme disconnect, amongst students, throughout the common and crucial science and social studies standards that should be taught and implemented daily by law. These content experiences, especially in science, expose students to skill sets and themes that are highly desired throughout higher education, the career world, and for the well-being and longevity of planet Earth.
As a solution to this problem, I created an after school program to provide staff and myself additional time to implement such curriculum and expand the depth of knowledge that students are exposed to. This positive additional time to the educational day, was able to come to life through a grant that I wrote and received to transport students from their elementary school to a local greenhouse. At the greenhouse, I was able to create a series of lessons focused on the resources needed for gardens and plant production. Through these lessons, I utilized inquiry based lesson plans to provide me with a template that was unique from typical lessons taught at school. Through these hands on experiences in our club, students were able to work at their own pace and learn about resources, soil, water, pollinators, and parts of a flower.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Implementing Kinetic Activities into a Children's Summer Program to Encourage STEM Engagement in Children Ages 5-11

Description

This creative project created and implemented a seven-day STEM curriculum that ultimately encouraged engagement in STEM subjects in students ages 5 through 11. The activities were incorporated into Arizona State University's Kids' Camp over the summer of 2017, every Tuesday

This creative project created and implemented a seven-day STEM curriculum that ultimately encouraged engagement in STEM subjects in students ages 5 through 11. The activities were incorporated into Arizona State University's Kids' Camp over the summer of 2017, every Tuesday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. with each activity running for roughly 40 minutes. The lesson plans were created to cover a myriad of scientific topics to account for varied student interest. The topics covered were plant biology, aerodynamics, zoology, geology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy. Each lesson was scaffolded to match the learning needs of the three age groups (5-6 year olds, 7-8 year olds, 9-11 year olds) and to encourage engagement. "Engagement" was measured by pre- and post-activity surveys approved by IRB. The surveys were in the form of statements where the children would totally agree, agree, be undecided, disagree, or totally disagree with it. To more accurately test engagement, the smiley face Likert scale was incorporated with the answer choices. After implementation of the intervention, two-tailed paired t-tests showed that student engagement significantly increased for the two lesson plans of Aerodynamics and Chemistry.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Introducing Children to Communication and Language Differences through American Sign Language

Description

For this project the main goal was to create a curriculum aimed at fourth grade students. This curriculum was intended to introduce them to different forms of communication, and teach them the skills, attitudes, behavior, and knowledge that would enable

For this project the main goal was to create a curriculum aimed at fourth grade students. This curriculum was intended to introduce them to different forms of communication, and teach them the skills, attitudes, behavior, and knowledge that would enable them to be able to communicate and interact better with a wide range of people with different types of communication styles. American Sign Language was used for this curriculum as an example of an alternative communication method. The project included developing teaching materials and lessons which made up the curriculum, after that this curriculum was implemented with 11 fourth grade students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Goal-Setting in the Elementary Education Classroom: A Component of Self-Regulated Learning

Description

The present study was conducted in order to investigate the implementation of the self-regulated learning component of goal-setting in the elementary education classroom. Essential questions posed addressed the reasoning behind why classrooms may not implement goal-setting despite the proven benefits.

The present study was conducted in order to investigate the implementation of the self-regulated learning component of goal-setting in the elementary education classroom. Essential questions posed addressed the reasoning behind why classrooms may not implement goal-setting despite the proven benefits. Also studied was the application of goal-setting within the classroom and what that may look like for educators. Finally, student preferences were observed and taken into consideration during implementation in order to help the study benefit them as much as possible. Participants included 29 fourth grade students at Rover Elementary School. The study was conducted over a six-week period by a student teacher that was completing their Senior Residency in this particular classroom. During study implementation, students were introduced to the concept of goal-setting. Using a series of goal-setting documents, students practiced goal-setting in, first, a Reader's Workshop period then, secondly, in a Writing Block. It was concluded that goal-setting may not be implemented in the classroom due to the amount of time necessary to complete the practice as well as the possibility that educators may not have the knowledge needed to properly make use of the practice. The application of the practice brings to light the need for students to include the setting of process goals in addition to product goals. Through the use of an exit survey, student preferences revealed that initially, they would rather have pre-written process goals to aim towards achieving rather than having to develop their own. In the future, it is suggested to conduct this study over a longer period of time in order to evaluate if students can develop their own goal-setting strategies.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2014-05

Integrating Systems Thinking Concepts into an Elementary School Gardening Program: Analyzing Sustainability Education

Description

This research paper assesses the effectiveness of a remote garden-based learning curriculum in teaching elementary students’ basic systems thinking concepts. Five remote lessons were designed, covering different garden topics, and in order to integrate systems thinking concepts, the Systems Thinking

This research paper assesses the effectiveness of a remote garden-based learning curriculum in teaching elementary students’ basic systems thinking concepts. Five remote lessons were designed, covering different garden topics, and in order to integrate systems thinking concepts, the Systems Thinking Hierarchical Model was used. This model includes eight emergent characteristics of systems thinking necessary for developing systems thinking competency. Five students were given the remote garden-based learning lessons. Student work was evaluated for systems thinking understanding and student outcomes were compared to anticipated learning outcomes. Results suggest that elementary students are able to understand basic systems thinking concepts because student work met anticipated outcomes for four systems thinking characteristics and exceeded anticipated outcomes for one characteristic. These results are significant because they further confirm that elementary-aged students do have the ability to understand systems thinking and they contribute to a growing movement to integrate sustainability education into elementary curriculum.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-05

Pier Pressure

Description

Peer pressure is a very broad topic. Researching peer pressure and friendships allows me to back up my creative project, a children’s picture book, with reliable information. This topic is important because it affects everyone, no matter the age or

Peer pressure is a very broad topic. Researching peer pressure and friendships allows me to back up my creative project, a children’s picture book, with reliable information. This topic is important because it affects everyone, no matter the age or situation. The book can be used as a tool for teachers and parents to start a conversation about peer pressure. It presents the topic in a light-hearted manner, where different characters have unique experiences that affects how they treat others. Pier Pressure is a social emotional literacy picture book meant for young children. I researched the importance of social emotional learning and how it can de depicted through children’s books. I explain the methods I used to create this book and share the research about friendships that guided my writing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Experiential Learning in the K-8 Classroom

Description

Experiential learning is the process of gaining new information by participating in some sort of experience. One way this can occur inside the classroom, as in the inquiry model or problem-based learning. It can also occur outside of the classroom,

Experiential learning is the process of gaining new information by participating in some sort of experience. One way this can occur inside the classroom, as in the inquiry model or problem-based learning. It can also occur outside of the classroom, as in outdoor education or field trips. Recently, virtual experiential learning opportunities have surfaced, including virtual field trips, experiments, and manipulatives. This project aims to define experiential learning, including examples in every context. Then, it describes current elementary school teachers' perceptions of experiential learning via survey results. The final product also includes an Appendix which is made up of experiential learning lesson plans for each context.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-12

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A Novel Approach to Teaching Spanish: A 5th Grade Technology-Based 5E Spanish Curriculum

Description

The 5E model of instruction is most commonly used in STEM; however, this thesis explores the idea of integrating the 5E model into second-language teaching of Spanish. Furthermore, this project incorporates technology into the 5E system to create engaging lessons.

The 5E model of instruction is most commonly used in STEM; however, this thesis explores the idea of integrating the 5E model into second-language teaching of Spanish. Furthermore, this project incorporates technology into the 5E system to create engaging lessons. The overarching question of this paper is “How can technology and the 5E model be combined to create effective 5th-grade Spanish lesson plans?” This thesis includes four complete Spanish 5E lesson plans designed for a 5th-grade class.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

Educating Students on Water Resources, the Importance of Drinking Water, and the Use of Biomimicry

Description

Clean and accessible drinking water is a crucial and limited resource. As the world's population grows and demand increases, water resources will become more limited. This project aims to educate students on water resources, drinking water, and how biomimicry can

Clean and accessible drinking water is a crucial and limited resource. As the world's population grows and demand increases, water resources will become more limited. This project aims to educate students on water resources, drinking water, and how biomimicry can allow society to improve its water usage. The project consists of a ten day unit plan which addresses several water topics such as: the various uses of water, water distribution, where drinking water comes from, the water treatment process, and more. After establishing background knowledge on water and surrounding issues, the students will be challenged to design a water bottle using biomimicry. Biomimicry is looking at nature to draw and inspire solutions to human problems. This unit has been optimized for use by elementary teachers. The ten day unit consists of a lesson summary, objectives, standards, and recommended activities for each day. Of the ten days, three lesson plans were fully developed using the 5E format. The research supporting this project is compiled in the following report.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

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Book it, 1st Grade! Keeping the “Physical” in Physical Education while Integrating Children's Literature

Description

Physical activity (PA) has been shown to increase cognitive function, with higher test scores being reported for students engaged in higher levels PA. Additionally, the integration of the Common Core content into physical education allows for more Common Core content

Physical activity (PA) has been shown to increase cognitive function, with higher test scores being reported for students engaged in higher levels PA. Additionally, the integration of the Common Core content into physical education allows for more Common Core content practice while students meet physical education objectives. Integration can be defined as the teaching of two or more subject areas simultaneously to enhance students’ learning and understanding. This novel shift to integration is underpinned by Fullan’s Change Theory where students may learn content in new and meaningful ways that meet the goals of multiple realms in education. The purpose of this crossover, replication design study was to investigate first-grade students’ enjoyment levels (enjoyment exit slips), attitudes (pre- & post-surveys), step counts (accelerometers), reading and listening comprehension (Accelerated Reader testing), as well as students’ and teachers’ perceptions (interviews & field notes) when integrating children’s literature into the fitness segment of physical education. Twenty-one first-grade students, two first-grade classroom teachers, and two physical education teachers from two different schools (Private and Public) in Southwestern, US participated in this study for six weeks each (12 weeks across the two schools). At each school, one first grade class participated as both the control and intervention groups. Overall, the results from integrating children’s literature into the physical education fitness segment were positive. Students’ enjoyment levels were high, their attitudes remained positive, they maintained similar step counts throughout the intervention periods, and the students scored similarly on the Accelerated Reader assessments from content taught in the classroom versus content presented in physical education. Additionally, students’ and teachers’ perceptions were positive, underpinned by Fullan’s Change Theory and resulted in the following three themes for students: (a) Motivation and engagement, (b) learning as perceived by students, and (c) home environment, as well as the following two themes for teachers: (a) Motivation and resources, and (b) stay the course. To my knowledge, this is the first experimental investigation of the integration of children’s literature into physical education which provides necessary evidence and an invaluable start to this important line of inquiry.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021