Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

134282-Thumbnail Image.png

The Influence of Living Arrangements on Couple's Conflict Topics: A Daily Diary Study of Young Adult Couples

Description

My thesis examined differences in areas of relationship conflict among various living arrangements of couples. I analyzed 249 phone call interviews from 54 couples that resided in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, had been in a relationship for at least

My thesis examined differences in areas of relationship conflict among various living arrangements of couples. I analyzed 249 phone call interviews from 54 couples that resided in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, had been in a relationship for at least six months, and were at least 21 years of age. By using a qualitative analysis, I analyzed differences in frequently mentioned areas of conflict (i.e. power, social issues, personal flaws, distrust, intimacy, personal distance) between romantic couples in three common couple living arrangements (i.e. non-cohabiting, cohabiting, and married). Findings showed certain areas of conflict were prevalent among all living arrangements, namely power and personal flaws. There were some differences between each living arrangement group: The non-cohabiting group was the only one to report distrust as a top area of conflict, and the cohabiting group reported more frequent incidents of conflict involving personal flaws than the married group. The married group identified social issues as a more prevalent area of conflict than the other groups. Differences in prevalent areas of conflict were examined in relation to varying levels of personal, structural and moral commitment that occur throughout the identified living arrangements.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-05

135014-Thumbnail Image.png

Do Young-Adult Cannabis Users Show Amotivation? An Analysis of Reports from Third-Party Observers

Description

Cannabis use has been purported to cause an amotivation-like syndrome among users. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether third party observers noticed amotivation among cannabis users. Participants in this study were 72 undergraduate university students, with a

Cannabis use has been purported to cause an amotivation-like syndrome among users. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether third party observers noticed amotivation among cannabis users. Participants in this study were 72 undergraduate university students, with a mean age of M=19.20 years old (SD=2.00). Participants nominated Informants who knew them well and these informants completed a version of the 18-item Apathy Evaluation Scale. Results indicated that more frequent cannabis use was associated with higher informant-reported levels of amotivation, even when controlling for age, sex, psychotic-like experiences, SES, alcohol use, tobacco use, other drug use, and depression symptoms (β=0.34, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.64, p=.027). A lack of motivation severe enough to be visible by a third party has the potential to have negative social impacts on individuals who use cannabis regularly.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

166253-Thumbnail Image.png

Tide Pods and Teenagers: The Psychology of Risk-Taking in Young Adults

Description

The worldwide involvement and the detrimental impact of viral online challenges are distinct features that create a growing societal concern for young people. This study used an exploratory approach to investigate factors that predict young adult’s participation in viral online

The worldwide involvement and the detrimental impact of viral online challenges are distinct features that create a growing societal concern for young people. This study used an exploratory approach to investigate factors that predict young adult’s participation in viral online challenges. Specifically, the study analyzed the extent to which age, personality, social media use, and psychological motives (i.e., social connectedness and online self-concept) predicted participation in viral online challenges in a sample of 18- to 25-year-old college students. In a correlational, cross-sectional online survey, participants completed measures of the Big Five personality traits, degree of social media use, social media engagement, and motives, as well as attitudes and behaviors related to internet challenges. I tested two multiple regression models to investigate key predictors of attitudes and participation in viral online challenges. I found that age, degree of social media use, and social media engagement predicted differences in participants’ familiarity with and likelihood of having taken part in specific online challenges. In addition, social media use and engagement and social connectedness were significant positive predictors of participants’ scores on a measure of attitudes surrounding viral online challenges. Whereas the Big Five personality trait of conscientiousness was a significant negative predictor of attitudes about viral online challenges, there was little evidence overall of a link between the Big Five personality traits and participation in viral online challenges. Limitations of the present study and directions for future research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05