Matching Items (16)

Sustainable Track Stadiums of the 21st Century: Ecoregional Design

Description

This thesis will discuss how design strategies reduce the impact track venues
have on the environment and how to enhance the sense of place by investigating
ecoregional design for now

This thesis will discuss how design strategies reduce the impact track venues
have on the environment and how to enhance the sense of place by investigating
ecoregional design for now and for the future. The specific site where examples of
sustainable design will be implemented is at the proposed new Arizona State University
Track and field that will be relocated as part of the Novus Innovation Corridor Athletic
Village. First, we will discuss the impact sports have on our health and culture and why
athletics matters to society. Understanding the history of track and field and the
evolution of track stadiums and looking at current designs of stadiums will provide
insight for future track designs. Next, we will look at some existing track stadiums
around the United States and how each design is adjusted to the climate and weather of
the region to help the stadium last longer and be more sustainable. After that, we will
look at what is working for the existing Sun Angel Stadium and what should be improved
and implemented in the new design. Lastly, we will explore a proposed design for the
new Sun Angel Track Stadium and how it will benefit the student athletes, spectators,
and the environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Transitioning to a More Sustainable Common Space in an Arizona HOA

Description

The suburbs provoke a deeply polarized reaction, more so than most other components of the urban landscape. Those who live in the suburbs often love them for their quietude and

The suburbs provoke a deeply polarized reaction, more so than most other components of the urban landscape. Those who live in the suburbs often love them for their quietude and their spaciousness, even while urban designers lament suburban sprawl. Regardless, suburbs are deeply entrenched in patterns of American urban land use, so an evolution to more sustainable land use will require incremental changes to suburban landscapes. The purpose of this project is twofold: one, to design a transition to a more sustainable landscape for an HOA in Gilbert, Arizona; and two, to abstract the process of designing this transition so that it can be applied on a larger scale.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Salt River Diaries: Repair, Restore, Redevelop

Description

Now dry and broken, the Salt River once supplied a great legacy of Riparian vegetation through the Sonoran desert. This verdant landscape flourished from perennial flows of a river fed

Now dry and broken, the Salt River once supplied a great legacy of Riparian vegetation through the Sonoran desert. This verdant landscape flourished from perennial flows of a river fed by high mountain snowmelt. However, multiple dams within those mountain canyons and channelization for the purpose of flood protection have nearly dried up the Salt. Through the process of design I examined the potential to repair, restore, and redevelop the river, choosing a site within the reach of the Salt River that currently includes an artificial retention area called Tempe Town Lake. Since 1999 a two mile portion of the river channel has contained the reservoir for the purpose of recreation and development within the city of Tempe. As I investigated the viability of restoring an urban desert river to a more natural riparian condition, I developed a master plan that merges ecological river restoration with sustainable urban development. Research into the vegetative communities historically occurring along the river's edge guided me to create a project based in ecological principles. Expanding the concrete channel to a wider river presence followed examples set by case studies and the historic character of the Salt River. A new braided low flow channel, allowed to meander with the natural currents of the river, is terraced upwards in a gentle slope that maintains current 500-year flow plains. The vegetation communities I propose to establish along the new terraced elevations are adapted from Charles H. Lowe's profile of a foothill canyon and archival research specific to this portion of the Salt River. As a way to support the reintroduction of Arizona's lost riparian plant communities, the master plan incorporates the use of greywater and A/C condensate collection from proposed developments along the river's edge. These new water systems would be substantial enough to sustain riparian vegetation creation and in addition, provide for ground water recharge. Additional developments continue the City of Tempe's goal to expand development along the river and adjacent to the downtown core. Providing for increased recreational opportunity in a river setting improves the quality of life in Tempe and sets the community apart from surrounding desert cities. By applying ecological and sustainable design and planning principles, the Salt River Diaries master plan repairs the river's flow, restores the riparian vegetation, and redevelops the edge between the city and river.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Debunking Common Landscaping Misconceptions in Phoenix, Arizona

Description

This project was inspired by Dr. Kelli L. Larson’s research which disproved three common landscaping misconceptions in the Phoenix Valley. The first misconception states that newcomers, not long-time Phoenicians more

This project was inspired by Dr. Kelli L. Larson’s research which disproved three common landscaping misconceptions in the Phoenix Valley. The first misconception states that newcomers, not long-time Phoenicians more often have and prefer grassy lawns instead of xeric, desert-adapted landscapes when actually the opposite is true. Secondly, the rise in xeric landscapes is not due to personal choice but rather a variety of other factors such as developer decisions. Finally, Dr. Larson’s research also disproves the assumption that people who possess pro-environmental attitudes correspondingly demonstrate sustainable landscaping behavior, and finds that people with those attitudes actually tend to irrigate more frequently in the winter months. Debunking these misconceptions is important because the long-term impacts of global climate change could have effects on water use in the desert southwest, and promoting water conservation in urban residential landscaping is an important step in the creation of sustainable water use policy. <br/><br/>The goal of my project was to make this information more accessible to broader public audiences who may not have access to it outside of research circles. I decided to create a zine, a small batch, hand-made mini-magazine, centered around disproving these myths so that the information could be distributed to broader audiences. I conducted informal stakeholder interviews to inform my design in order to appeal to those audiences, and constructed a 16-page booklet which debunked the myths and encouraged critical thinking about individual water use and urban landscaping habits. The zine included hand-painted illustrations and was constructed as a physical copy with the intention of eventually copying and distributing both a physical and digital version. The purpose of this project is to create a way of accessing reliable information about urban landscaping for residents of the Phoenix Valley, where the climate and geography necessitate water conservation.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Community Gardening and Learning

Description

The goal of this creative thesis is to construct and implement an outdoor learning environment for the students who currently attend AIM's homework club. The project is underway and will be undergoing construction over the next few months.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Plant Selection for Harsh Urban Environments in the Phoenix/Tempe Area

Description

This project seeks to provide Landscape Architects practicing in the Phoenix/Tempe area of Arizona with a guide to assist with the process of selecting plants for harsh urban environments in

This project seeks to provide Landscape Architects practicing in the Phoenix/Tempe area of Arizona with a guide to assist with the process of selecting plants for harsh urban environments in the region. The first step was an online survey of professionals in the area, to determine which urban conditions were harsh, followed by interviews with consenting survey respondents to determine why each condition was harsh, which plants belong in it, and what sites in the study area are good examples of well-planted areas in harsh conditions. The final product is an essay (detailing the research methods and findings of the study), a set of case studies that visually document some of the sites suggested by survey respondents, and a set of plant lists for each harsh urban situation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Impact of Campus Outdoor Spaces on Student Happiness: A Case Study of the ASU Tempe Campus

Description

College and university campuses can play an important role in a student’s life, and campus outdoor spaces have the ability to positively impact various aspects of student health and well-being.

College and university campuses can play an important role in a student’s life, and campus outdoor spaces have the ability to positively impact various aspects of student health and well-being. It has long been understood that natural environments can promote health and well being, and in recent years research has begun to examine the impact of parks and landscapes in urban settings on subjective well-being (SWB). Subjective well-being (aka “happiness”) refers to
one’s self-reported measure of well-being and is thought of as having a high level of positive affect, low level of negative affect, and high degree of life satisfaction (Diener, 1984).

This study was conducted to assess the interrelationships between affective experiences, SWB, and usage of campus outdoor spaces in order to learn how outdoor spaces on the Arizona State University (ASU) Tempe campus can be enhanced to increase SWB and usage. In total, 832 students completed a survey questionnaire 1,140 times for six campus outdoor spaces. The results showed that students experience the greatest amount of happiness in the Secret Garden
and James Turrell ASU Skyspace, relaxation/restoration is the affective experience most strongly related to SWB, and SWB is negatively correlated with frequency of visits but positively link with duration of visits. To improve student happiness and usage of outdoor spaces on campuses, planners and designers should work on increasing the relaxing/restorative qualities of existing
locations, creating new spaces for relaxation/restoration around campus, reducing the perception of crowding and noise in large spaces, increasing fun/excitement by adding stimuli and/or opportunities for activity and entertainment, and adding equipment necessary for students to perform the activities they want. In addition to the ASU Tempe campus, the methodology and
findings of this research could be used to improve outdoor spaces on other college and university campuses and other types of outdoor environments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Re-imagining Rio Salado's Sensory Experience: Restorative Design Promoting Sensory and Healing Environments for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Description

This project focuses on providing a series of Sensory Design Guidelines (SDG) for the creation of restorative environments for people and nature promoting cognitive health, motor skill development, and outdoor

This project focuses on providing a series of Sensory Design Guidelines (SDG) for the creation of restorative environments for people and nature promoting cognitive health, motor skill development, and outdoor therapy for urban society’s most vulnerable. Although the project framework is structured around guidelines for the creation of spaces specifically designed for children with Sensory Processing Disorder, it is not restricted to that specific application. Guidelines are further developed structured around inclusive and universal design approaches.

The project is divided into four sections. The first section explores what Sensory Processing Disorder is, how Occupational Therapy with Sensory Integration positively impacts healing processes, and how designers can expand this processing into the natural healing environment of the great outdoors in a toxic and urbanized world. The second section discusses the vision, goals and objectives for implementation of Sensory Design Guidelines as discussed in the third section. And finally, the fourth section provides a conceptual example of what SDG would look like when applied to a physical site along a natural corridor in a densely urbanized landscape.

The final example of SDG implementation is applied to a site along the Salt River (Rio Salado) Corridor in Phoenix, Arizona. The Corridor is the subject of a coordinated inter-agency public/private restoration initiative spanning more than fifty-five miles along the Salt River that has been strongly supported by former U.S. Senator John McCain and greatly influenced by active involvement from Arizona State University students. The designated example site is designed as one site to be utilized in a larger network of easily accessible Sensory sites, each to be designed with a different approach to sensory development, as well as variation in challenges based on age and sensory abilities. Guidelines are intended to work in conjunction with future local projects promoting social and ecological growth and wellbeing, such as the Phoenix site is intended to work in conjunction with future Rio Re-imagined projects.

The findings, guidelines, and examples provided throughout the paper are focused on re-inventing the relationship between the built and natural environments in the urbanized landscape into one of daily nature-engagement and can be applied to any group living within an urban setting. By designing for society’s most vulnerable populations, design application benefits not only the individual, but creates a resilient, healthy environment for the entire urban population today, and for future generations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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A Study to Evaluate Urban Heat Mitigation Design Strategies to Improve Pedestrian’s Thermal Perception in Existing Canyons of Extreme Hot-Arid Cities. The Case of Phoenix, Arizona

Description

The rapid rate of urbanization coupled with continued population growth and anthropogenic activities has resulted in a myriad of urban climate related impacts across different cities around the world. Hot-arid

The rapid rate of urbanization coupled with continued population growth and anthropogenic activities has resulted in a myriad of urban climate related impacts across different cities around the world. Hot-arid cities are more vulnerable to induced urban heat effects due to the intense solar radiation during most of the year, leading to increased ambient air temperature and outdoor/indoor discomfort in Phoenix, Arizona. With the fast growth of the capital city of Arizona, the automobile-dependent planning of the city contributed negatively to the outdoor thermal comfort and to the people's daily social lives. One of the biggest challenges for hot-arid cities is to mitigate against the induced urban heat increase and improve the outdoor thermal. The objective of this study is to propose a pragmatic and useful framework that would improve the outdoor thermal comfort, by being able to evaluate and select minimally invasive urban heat mitigation strategies that could be applied to the existing urban settings in the hot-arid area of Phoenix. The study started with an evaluation of existing microclimate conditions by means of multiple field observations cross a North-South oriented urban block of buildings within Arizona State University’s Downtown campus in Phoenix. The collected data was evaluated and analyzed for a better understanding of the different local climates within the study area, then used to evaluate and partially validate a computational fluid dynamics model, ENVI-Met. Furthermore, three mitigation strategies were analyzed to the Urban Canopy Layer (UCL) level, an increase in the fraction of permeable materials in the ground surface, adding different configurations of high/low Leaf Area Density (LAD) trees, and replacing the trees configurations with fabric shading. All the strategies were compared and analyzed to determine the most impactful and effective mitigation strategies. The evaluated strategies have shown a substantial cooling effect from the High LAD trees scenarios. Also, the fabric shading strategies have shown a higher cooling effect than the Low LAD trees. Integrating the trees scenarios with the fabric shading had close cooling effect results in the High LAD trees scenarios. Finally, how to integrate these successful strategies into practical situations was addressed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020